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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in Cane Bay, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Cane Bay, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – Cane Bay’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Cane Bay, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Cane Bay, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in Cane Bay, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Cane Bay, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Cane Bay, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Cane Bay, SC.

Refinancing in
Cane Bay, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Cane Bay, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Cane Bay, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Cane Bay may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Cane Bay, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Cane Bay loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Cane Bay

Following the 2015 flood, area still works to tame rainwater

In mid-October of 2015 the Lowcountry was still assessing damage caused by a rare flooding event, better known as the 1,000-year flood. Over four days, as if on a conveyor belt, a swath of rain continuously passed over the area, flooding homes, collapsing roads and leaving billions in damage statewide.Much of the flooding locally happened from Charleston’s peninsula and up into Summerville and Berkeley County.The Lowcountry is weather savvy, but the flooding from 2015 was unlike anything the area has experienced before. R...

In mid-October of 2015 the Lowcountry was still assessing damage caused by a rare flooding event, better known as the 1,000-year flood. Over four days, as if on a conveyor belt, a swath of rain continuously passed over the area, flooding homes, collapsing roads and leaving billions in damage statewide.

Much of the flooding locally happened from Charleston’s peninsula and up into Summerville and Berkeley County.

The Lowcountry is weather savvy, but the flooding from 2015 was unlike anything the area has experienced before. Record shattering rainfall steadily soaked areas that were never before vulnerable to flooding.

“It was a relatively narrow band of rain and it just continuously funneled over the same area for days on end. I mean it was really pretty incredible,” said Blair Holloway, lead meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Charleston.

The National Weather Service reports the deluge broke records for the most rain in a single day, two-day and four-day period. Some areas received close to two feet of rain between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5 of 2015. Meteorologists determined that in a single year, the chances of all the weather conditions coming together at the same time to create such torrent is just 1 percent.

“You have this larger area of rising motion and then you have basically a front at the surface. That front kind of serves as a place where the rising level of the atmosphere can essentially get focused in one area,” said Holloway. “That event was really a narrow band of heavy rain and that band of heavy rain just kept feeding right into Charleston, Berkeley County and up into the Midlands.”

Following the event, it was determined some areas locally were not capable of handling even half the amount rain the storm provided. In areas like Cane Bay, the retaining ponds that dot the many subdivisions and which are designed to deal with storm runoff overflowed their banks. Already aging, roads and bridges in many rural communities were washed away, leaving some places totally cut off.

But while the damage and recovery was costly, the lessons learned are invaluable.

“It was everywhere, I mean we had flooding everywhere,” said Summerville Mayor Ricky Waring. “It was just unbelievable. I’ve been here all my life and I’m 73 years old and I have never seen anything like that before in my life.”

Since the flooding, the town of Summerville has doubled the size of its storm water department but, the mayor admits, there is still a lot to do to make sure the town’s low spots are taken of.

“That’s all we can do, is keep on trying,” he said. “We are applying for every grant there is, federal and state, and we’ve had a little help there, so just working on it day to day and doing our very best.”

Currently the town’s water department is working to immediately find flooded areas after heavy rains and clear up any problems that may slow the flow of storm water.

Summerville’s neighbor up Highway 17 is also rethinking how it deals with drainage following the soaking’s sobering reminder. The water needs a place to go, and for the town of Moncks Corner, that’s the focus.

“We’ve learned a lot. We’ve done a lot to make our storm water capabilities more robust here in town since that time,” said Douglas Polen, the community development director for Moncks Corner.

Three years ago the town received a federal grant for storm water mitigation efforts. The town purchased privately owned property in some of the most flood prone areas, so the storm water department can have full access to the land to better corral storm water.

Before the flood, Berkeley County handled all the storm water drainage. Since then, the town has set up its own department to handle drainage.

“What we did to fund that is we created the storm water utility fee, which mirrors what Berkeley County does,” said Polen. “Basically, every developed property in town pays a little money on their property tax every year, and that’s what funds those guys to go out there and make sure that water flows. We know that if we have a major rain event today, we know that water is going to flow so much better.”

Buffalo Wild Wings Opens In Cane Bay

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. – Buffalo Wild Wings opened its brand new Summerville location Friday in Cane Bay. The new location brings over 100 full-time and part-time jobs to the community.The location, at 117 North Creek Drive, is the new center Stage Buffalo Wild Wings design with state of the art video display’s for customer’s to watch their favorite sports teams.Buffalo Wild Wings offers the brand’s award-winning chicken wings and 26 signature sauces and seasoning options, plus a other fan favorites inclu...

BERKELEY COUNTY, S.C. – Buffalo Wild Wings opened its brand new Summerville location Friday in Cane Bay. The new location brings over 100 full-time and part-time jobs to the community.

The location, at 117 North Creek Drive, is the new center Stage Buffalo Wild Wings design with state of the art video display’s for customer’s to watch their favorite sports teams.

Buffalo Wild Wings offers the brand’s award-winning chicken wings and 26 signature sauces and seasoning options, plus a other fan favorites including burgers, chicken sandwiches and an array of appetizers.

The new restaurant’s hours of operation are from 11 a.m. – 11 p.m, Sunday-Wednesday and 11 a.m. – midnight Thursday-Saturday.

For more information or to place a take out order with Buffalo Wild Wings, download the Buffalo Wild Wings App or visit www.buffalowildwings.com. Customers can also use DoorDash, GrubHub and Uber Eats to place an order. Buffalo Wild Wings is also available through EZ Cater, which can accommodate large orders for businesses and organizations with 24 hour advance notice.

Buffalo Wild Wings, founded in 1982, is the largest sports bar brand in the United States. Globally, there are more than 1,200 restaurants in 10 countries. Buffalo Wild Wings is part of the Inspire Brands family of restaurants. For more information, visit BuffaloWildWings.com and InspireBrands.com.

If you enjoy what you’re reading, please consider liking us on: Facebook, subscribing to our newsletter and following us on Twitter and Instagram. Feel free to also join our Facebook groups: Berkeley County, SC Residents: What’s On Your Mind?, Berkeley County Real Estate: Lots & Homes for Sale/Rent and Berkeley County, SC Jobs: Find a Job or Post a Job.

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Cobras carry 2 streaks to Stratford in next region clash

The Cane Bay Cobras carry a pair of streaks to Stratford High School on Oct. 8 when the two clash in the second Region 7-AAAAA matchup for both football teams.The Cobras, winners of four straight this season, have won six consecutive encounters against their fellow Berkeley County School District program, including a 32-10 victory last year. Cane Bay rushed for 333 yards and scored 20 straight points to pull away in that game.The Cobras (5-1, 1-0 region) are coming off a 27-7 victory in their Region 7-AAAAA opener against Wando...

The Cane Bay Cobras carry a pair of streaks to Stratford High School on Oct. 8 when the two clash in the second Region 7-AAAAA matchup for both football teams.

The Cobras, winners of four straight this season, have won six consecutive encounters against their fellow Berkeley County School District program, including a 32-10 victory last year. Cane Bay rushed for 333 yards and scored 20 straight points to pull away in that game.

The Cobras (5-1, 1-0 region) are coming off a 27-7 victory in their Region 7-AAAAA opener against Wando on Oct. 1. The Warriors, who finished with 159 total yards, scored on the final play to prevent the Cobras’ first shutout since 2016.

A week earlier, the Cobras’ defense allowed just a field goal in a 6-3 victory against Ashley Ridge. If they can limit Stratford to single digits, it would be the first time since September of 2011 Cane Bay held three straight opponents to single digits.

“We have been fortunate to play pretty well,” Cane Bay coach Russell Zehr said. “It’s one of those things where our defensive line has been able to control the front. We’ve got a really good group of linebackers. It makes it a whole lot easier in the secondary when the quarterback doesn’t have all day to throw it, but we haven’t played a true spread team yet. That’s always been our Achilles heel.”

Stratford (1-3, 0-1 region) fell to Summerville, 29-7. The Knights have dropped three straight since opening with a 15-14 victory against Hanahan, a common opponent with Cane Bay.

The Cobras lost to Hanahan, 28-21, but have won four straight since. Along the way, they more than doubled up West Ashley, 29-13, which knocked off Stratford, 27-14.

Stratford’s other region contest was Sept. 16 against Goose Creek, a 69-44 loss.

“They do a lot of the same stuff in a ton of formations,” Zehr said of Stratford’s offense. “You’re preparing for the same thing but out of 20 different sets. You’ve got to make sure your kids know all of the things they’re supposed to like who can go in motion and who can’t. They’ve got some speed, weapons and size.”

In more Oct. 8 games, Goose Creek hosts Fort Dorchester, Berkeley hosts Wando, Hanahan travels to Battery Creek, Philip Simmons hosts Lake Marion, Timberland travels to Burke, Cross goes to St. John’s and St. John’s Christian hosts Calhoun Academy.

On Oct. 1, Hanahan beat North Charleston and Philip Simmons defeated Burke. The score in both games was 63-0.

ROUNDUP: Hawks, Cobras, Wolves prevail

Hanahan rushed for more than 300 yards and handed Philip Simmons its first loss of the season, 27-17, on Sept. 17 at Hanahan in a non-region football game.The Hawks (2-1) bounced back from a 15-14 overtime loss to Stratford a week earlier. The Iron Horses dropped to 4-1.Hanahan senior running back Josh Shaw topped 150 yards rushing and scored his sixth (79 yards) and seventh touchdowns (23 yards) of the season. Sophomore Kevon Rivera and Cooper Smith added more than 100 yards combined. Smith scored on a 6-yard run.Hawks ...

Hanahan rushed for more than 300 yards and handed Philip Simmons its first loss of the season, 27-17, on Sept. 17 at Hanahan in a non-region football game.

The Hawks (2-1) bounced back from a 15-14 overtime loss to Stratford a week earlier. The Iron Horses dropped to 4-1.

Hanahan senior running back Josh Shaw topped 150 yards rushing and scored his sixth (79 yards) and seventh touchdowns (23 yards) of the season. Sophomore Kevon Rivera and Cooper Smith added more than 100 yards combined. Smith scored on a 6-yard run.

Hawks kicker Blake Morros was good on field goals of 29 and 38 yards.

Running back Isaac Schimpf scored on an 8-yard run in the first quarter for the Iron Horses and Sharod Williams found the end zone on a 16-yard run to tie the score 17-17 with 6:06 remaining in the third quarter. In between touchdowns, kicker Griffin Gore nailed a 34-yard field goal.

Hanahan travels to Porter-Gaud on Sept. 24 while Philip Simmons is off before hosting Burke on Oct. 1.

Cane Bay 29, West Ashley 13

Cane Bay scored on four long touchdown plays to more than double up West Ashley, 29-13, in a non-region football game on Sept. 17.

Cane Bay quarterback Jayvion Johnson raced 55 yards for a score and connected with Randolph Varner on a 67-yard touchdown pass. Cobras running back TJ Wright rushed for 106 yards and scored on a 57-yard run. Running back Jaylen Boudreaux also scored on a 55-yard run.

The Cobras (3-1) hit the road Sept. 24 to tangle with Ashley Ridge.

Cane Bay has won three straight matchups with the Foxes, including 13-10 last season. The Cobras lead the series, 8-7 going back to 2008 when both schools opened.

Excluding each team’s most decisive victory in the series – Ashley Ridge 24-7 in 2011 and Cane Bay 46-27 in 2014 – the other 13 matchups have been decided by an average of 6.53 points.

Timberland 18, Bishop England 10

Timberland High School improved to 3-0 on the football season with an 18-10 victory against Bishop England.

The Wolves host Chesnee High School on Sept. 24 with a chance to eclipse their win total from last season. Timberland has outscored its first three opponents 74-36 and finished with almost 380 yards against the Bishops.

Quarterback Kylen Brown was 11 of 19 for 137 yards and a 49-yard touchdown pass to Jacquez Prioleau. Prioleau grabbed eight passes for 115 yards. Running backs Demarri Middleton and Roman Wadford added 72 and 70 yards rushing, with each scoring once on the ground.

Residents along Highway 41 corridor wary of becoming next mega-development site

HUGER – When Edward Beaufort-Cutner was growing up, he could walk 3 miles in almost any direction from his modest one-story wooden home before reaching another house.Today, all Beaufort-Cutner, 77, needs to do is walk a few feet out his front door to realize that his family’s 50-acre homesite will soon be overwhelmed by new residential developments.Over the next five years, as many as 700 new homes in two developments — D.R. Horton’s French Quarter Creek and Toll Brothers’ Forrest Edge — will...

HUGER – When Edward Beaufort-Cutner was growing up, he could walk 3 miles in almost any direction from his modest one-story wooden home before reaching another house.

Today, all Beaufort-Cutner, 77, needs to do is walk a few feet out his front door to realize that his family’s 50-acre homesite will soon be overwhelmed by new residential developments.

Over the next five years, as many as 700 new homes in two developments — D.R. Horton’s French Quarter Creek and Toll Brothers’ Forrest Edge — will rise in this rural section of S.C. Highway 41 just steps from Beaufort-Cutner’s property.

The two developments served as prime hunting grounds in Beaufort-Cutner’s youth and were used as farmland by his extended family.

“The new developments are going to affect our quality of life in a major way,” he said. “The increase in traffic, the noise will change the complexion of this area that has been the same since, really, the end of the Civil War. I’m not against growth, it’s progress and I understand that progress can be good if it’s done in the right way. It’s just very concerning what’s happening to this area and I’m not sure what, if anything, can be done about it.”

The chances of the Highway 41 corridor around in this tiny Berkeley County community turning into another of the county’s mega-developments like Cane Bay or Carnes Crossroads are unlikely. The majority of land along the Highway 41 corridor north of Clements Ferry Road is zoned as an agricultural or preservation residential districts, which are designed to preserve and protect the rural residential character and sensitive natural and historical resources of the area.

The Francis Marion National Forrest and large-scale private conservation efforts have limited the amount of land available to developers to about 8,000 acres around Huger. With limited public sewer availability and the existing capacity of Highway 41, the area is not equipped to manage the demands generated by suburban development similar to Cainhoy Plantation off of Clements Ferry Road or in nearby Mount Pleasant across the Wando River.

“This is not a place to have suburban-sprawl style developments like we’ve seen in Mount Pleasant or in the northern part of Berkeley County,” said Coastal Conservation League senior development director Jason Crowley. “It just doesn’t make sense. The county would cripple themselves financially if they were to extend water and sewer lines out to that area. That’s also the heart of the Cooper River Historic District. Most of the families that live on the lands are in settlement communities and have lived there for generations. More development would only upset their way of life.”

Feeling the pressure

The Highway 41 corridor around Huger is feeling the pressure from suburban sprawl that is taking place in Mount Pleasant and in Cainhoy Plantation.

Cainhoy Plantation stretches across 9,000 acres along Clements Ferry and Cainhoy roads, between the Cooper and Wando rivers. When the last moving boxes are unloaded over the next decade about 9,000 homes will stand on the tract north of Daniel Island. It already features schools, apartments, a Publix supermarket, a few restaurants and retailers.

Huger residents don’t want to see a similar scene take place in their backyards.

The 259,000-acre Francis Marion National Forest takes up a huge swath of land along Highway 41 and serves as a quasi-buffer between developers and the established settlement communities already in place.

“The Francis Marion forest is true a blessing for us,” Beaufort-Cutner said.

Local conservation groups have done their share to gobble up land and keep it out of the hands of developers.

The Keystone Tract, a 4,300-acre parcel surrounded on three sides by the national forest, has been a sought-after property since International Paper put it up for sale in the early 2000s.

The land was peppered with controversy amid developers’ plans to build thousands of homes along the Highway 41. That triggered challenges from conservation and environmental groups that said the tract was an opportunity to connect the Francis Marion to the Cooper River and preserve safe passage for wildlife between the watersheds of the Santee and lower Cooper rivers.

In 2014, a local conservation group purchased a large piece of the Keystone Tract around Huger in an effort to preserve the ecologically important property on the edge of the national forest.

The Lowcountry Open Land Trust, under the name Quemby Barony LLC, paid $6.7 million for 1,677 acres along Highway 41. The property was part of the wetlands mitigation deal that Boeing Co. agreed to for its expansion of 500 acres at Charleston International Airport.

“It’s still making its way through of U.S. Corps of Engineers, but once that’s done it will be transferred to the (S.C.) Department of Natural Resources as a public access, wildlife management area and heritage preserve,” said David Ray, chief conservation officer for the Lowcountry Open Land Trust.

Over the next three years, the Land Trust secured another 1,000 acres along Highway 41, including a $3.5 million purchase of 600 acres of the Hyde Park Planation in 2017. The group has helped preserve thousands of acres along the corridor, which includes property like old rice plantations and land near industries, such as Nucor Steel and BP.

In all, Ray estimates the land trust has acquired more than 5,900 acres around Highway 41 and another 6,300 acres is being protected by private conservation efforts.

“This is a way to connect protected properties from the national forest to the river,” Ray said.

The national forest is home to more than 400 species of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles and 1,600 species of plants, including 12 types of orchids and 12 species of carnivorous plants.

‘Who will remember us?’

Despite the best efforts of conservation groups, growth and development is coming to Highway 41.

“There’s still a threat to this area,” Ray said. “There are still large tracts of land that developers can buy. We still have not bridged that gap to maintain the wildlife habitat that spans across that area. We want to work with those local landowners to protect those properties.”

The growth on Highway 41 begins just over the Wando River from Mount Pleasant. Homebuilder PulteGroup has broken ground on Wando Village, which when finished will have 120 homesites. Three miles up the road, D.R. Horton’s Seven Bridges at Seven Lakes, a 353-acre development, is nearly sold out of its 150 homesites.

French Quarter Creek and Forest Edge take up a 922-acre pocket around Beaufort-Cutner’s property and will have almost 700 units when completed.

“The pressure coming up from Mount Pleasant and Cainhoy may make this seem like an ideal growth area, but it’s not because this is a culturally historic area,” Crowley said. “These one-off suburban style developments will upset the balance between humans and nature. Preserving this area should be a high priority for the federal and local governments.”

Berkeley County is putting the final touches on its 10-year comprehensive plan, which will address land use along Highway 41. The county’s plan is expected to be approved by the end of spring 2022.

One of the biggest issues facing development in the area is the lack of public water and sewer lines. The county currently has no plans to extend water and sewer lines along Highway 41.

“There are not a lot of people clamoring for sewer because they know what that means, and they don’t want it,” said Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb. “Most of the development in that area is zoned for about one unit per acre. Those types of developments don’t go up like a bunch of cookie-cutter neighborhoods that end up with real high density. They tend to fit the character of the community a little better.”

If more development does come to Highway 41 it will be as a result of current land owners selling off their property.

“The landowners will control growth around Huger,” Cribb said. “A lot of times growth happens because an individual sells 500-600 acres to a builder. If they don’t sell it to a builder, growth won’t happen. The great thing about our county is that we offer a diverse place to live. If you want to live out in the country in Huger or Jamestown, you can do that. If you want to be a part of a development with an HOA like Cane Bay or Nexton, you can do that, too. I wouldn’t want to see the county all rural or all urbanized.”

Like the ocean’s tides, Beaufort-Cutner understands that development and growth are going to be constant and inevitable.

The Air Force veteran would just like to see it done in the right way.

“The folks that have lived here have been here for generations,” he said. “We want to hold onto our language and our traditions. If we lose them for the sake of development and growth, who will we be? Who will remember us? We will be gone forever.”

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