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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in Isle of Palms, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Isle of Palms, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – Isle of Palms’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Isle of Palms, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Isle of Palms, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in Isle of Palms, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Isle of Palms, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Isle of Palms, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Isle of Palms, SC.

Refinancing in
Isle of Palms, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Isle of Palms, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Isle of Palms, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Isle of Palms may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Isle of Palms, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Isle of Palms loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Isle of Palms

Editorial: Charleston beach access isn’t getting any easier, so prepare for the chaos

One of the earliest signs of a budding conflict over driving to a Charleston area beach was actually a missing sign.In May 1962, the repeated theft of street signs on Sullivan’s Island made headlines; more than 30 had been stolen in recent months, costing the town about $500 and causing headaches for local officials, such as Assistant Fire Chief James J. Rowland, who also painted the town’s signs.“We don’t put those signs up just to decorate the area,” he told a News and Courier reporter. “Th...

One of the earliest signs of a budding conflict over driving to a Charleston area beach was actually a missing sign.

In May 1962, the repeated theft of street signs on Sullivan’s Island made headlines; more than 30 had been stolen in recent months, costing the town about $500 and causing headaches for local officials, such as Assistant Fire Chief James J. Rowland, who also painted the town’s signs.

“We don’t put those signs up just to decorate the area,” he told a News and Courier reporter. “They are there for a specific and important purpose.” One missing sign warned of parking that blocked a beach access road. “The road,” he said, “is used to get emergency equipment to the water in case of drowning or other emergencies. To block that road could easily cost someone’s life.”

Suffice it to say the challenges around local beach access have evolved since then, but as many will discover as this Memorial Day weekend rolls around and as the weather and water get warmer, they certainly haven’t gotten any easier.

In fact, the tension between island residents and the growing number of people who drive to these communities to spend a day at the beach reached a crescendo last year, after several barrier island leaders voted to restrict access significantly as COVID-19 arrived. Those restrictions were peppered with growing tensions over where day-trippers may and may not park their cars — and how much they may be charged to park.

The dust-up even led to a new state law, sponsored by state Sen. Larry Grooms, whose district includes Mount Pleasant and some residents most upset by the new limits on access. The law, which Gov. Henry McMaster signed last week, clarifies that the S.C. Department of Transportation has the right to do what it always thought it had the right to do: namely, veto any parking restrictions island communities want to place on state-owned roads.

That strikes us as a reasonable response: It doesn’t violate the concept of Home Rule, since it applies only to roads that are owned and maintained by the state. And it ensures public access to our public beaches won’t be excessively curtailed by local regulations — at least not on state roads. Beach communities unable to get the state’s blessing on plans to restrict parking have the option of working with the Transportation Department to transfer ownership of the roads at issue.

In fact, our beach access is getting curtailed by the simple forces of supply and demand, as our region grows in residents and its appeal to visitors, increasing numbers of whom must vie for space on beaches that aren’t getting any longer or wider or more numerous. And the problem is more acute on the roads, where parking and traffic lead to significant congestion, than on the sand itself.

We’re encouraged that CARTA launched a new summer weekend shuttle bus from Mount Pleasant to the Isle of Palms today, and we’re pleased that both Mount Pleasant and the Isle of Palms agreed to chip in so the shuttle can be free — a perk that we hope will persuade more people to leave their cars at Mount Pleasant’s Towne Centre shopping area and ride the shuttle. This obviously won’t solve the problem, but every little bit helps.

Getting to and from the beach is only part of the puzzle. The beaches also regulate things as varied as alcohol, pets, hole digging, fishing, shade devices, sand fencing, sea oats, metal detecting, fireworks and thongs. It behooves both vacationers and day-trippers to do a little homework ahead of time to make their trip to the shore as enjoyable and relaxing as possible.

South Carolina’s beaches certainly enhance our quality of life. But only 10 states grew faster than we did during the past decade, and while there are 10.7% more of us today than in 2010, our shoreline hasn’t changed much at all. So we need more planning and forethought about as how best to share these special places.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Dozens of dead Jellyfish spotted on South Carolina beaches raising questions and safety concerns

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCBD) – Dead jellyfish are lining the sand along Lowcountry beaches and now many are wondering what’s causing the problem.Dozens of dead jellyfish have been spotted both in water and along the sand at the beach on the Isle of Palms raising the question for beach goers: why are so many washing up? Experts say it’s not completely unusual.“Yesterday we saw maybe four or five,” said a beach goer.Experts say the jellyfish showing up are ‘Cannonball Jellyfish’. The...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCBD) – Dead jellyfish are lining the sand along Lowcountry beaches and now many are wondering what’s causing the problem.

Dozens of dead jellyfish have been spotted both in water and along the sand at the beach on the Isle of Palms raising the question for beach goers: why are so many washing up? Experts say it’s not completely unusual.

“Yesterday we saw maybe four or five,” said a beach goer.

Experts say the jellyfish showing up are ‘Cannonball Jellyfish’. They’re a more mild type of the species than the ones that generally sting people.

The flowy creatures by nature begin showing up in waters off the coast of Charleston as the weather and water warms up.

“They really rely on wind and water currents to and tide to move them horizontally through the water,” says Erin Weeks, a Media Coordinator with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resource’s Marine Division.

Weeks says Cannonball Jellyfish stranding’s are common May through August, particularly after storms.

“So anytime we see periods of strong onshore winds or storms offshore that would cause currents pushing jellyfish onto the beaches we’ll see stranding’s,” says Weeks.

Weeks says while the purple and clear blobs are fun to look at, they should be left alone if encountered on the beach.

“They are typically considered harmless to humans, if you do get stung by them it’ll be mild it’s more like a skin irritation,” says Weeks.

And while this type of jellyfish showing up on the Isle of Palms are mainly harmless. Weeks says other types of jellyfish packing stronger stings have also been known to call the Carolina coast home.

“So if you’re not able to identify the jelly in the water or on the beach it’s best just to avoid them because actually dead jellyfish can still sting you after they’ve been beached,” says Weeks.

Weeks says the Department of Natural Resources does not require sightings of Cannonball Jellyfish to be reported. They say beach goers can expect to stranding’s from time to time over the next several months.

South Carolina Professional Firefighter Association raises concern about low IOP pay

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — The South Carolina Professional Firefighters Association said the wages for the Isle of Palm Fire Department are not high enough.The city of Isle of Palms said the lowest paid firefighter earns $12.55 an hour."They are not paying well. And they are not paying down the road, people are realizing it,&qu...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — The South Carolina Professional Firefighters Association said the wages for the Isle of Palm Fire Department are not high enough.

The city of Isle of Palms said the lowest paid firefighter earns $12.55 an hour.

"They are not paying well. And they are not paying down the road, people are realizing it," said William Pesature, Vice President of the SC Professional Firefighter Association.

Pesature said in the firefighting world you want to build a team that has experience, training and standing.

He said the Isle of Palms is not doing that for their firefighters and a change needs to be made when it comes to pay.

He said the department has two problems: no fire chief for the last eight months and the firefighter pay rate.

"You should be able to afford a decent wage for your firefighters so that they want to stay there. If you have one of the richest cities in the state, and you are not taking care of your first responders? What's going to happen to your in an emergency situation?" he said.

Pesature said the issue should concern taxpayers on the island because when someone leaves the department the city has to pay to train a new employee.

"Training is very expensive. Because they have to pay for a person to go to school and then when they are supposed to be in the fire house (and) they have to pay someone overtime to cover their spot to maintain the standards of staffing," he said.

Read More: New signs going up at Johns Island bus stop to remind drivers to stop for school buses

ABC News 4 reached out to the city for comment. Desiree Farago, the city administrator said in part, "The City is in the process of finalizing a wage and compensation analysis with the goal of identifying market based and competitive wages for all City positions. We expect the report and recommendations for adjustments will be in place before the end of the year."

"We have also collected feedback from every member of the fire department regarding how we reward high performance and increase wages throughout their tenure with the city that will be incorporated into new compensation policies," John Moye, an IOP councilman, said.

Moye said the consultant's leading the wage compensation plan should be presenting to council sometime in September.

SCDOT tells Isle of Palms to restore beach parking, rolls back prior approval

ISLE OF PALMS — The fight over South Carolina beach parking has taken another sharp turn after the state Department of Transportation revoked its approval of the island’s 2015 parking plan that barred nonresidents from using spaces on most streets.The barrier island across from Mount Pleasant has been the subject of intense blowback after announcing plans in 2020 to eliminate hundreds of parking spaces near the popular beach — a plan the DOT also blocked.The IOP town government already is facing a parking laws...

ISLE OF PALMS — The fight over South Carolina beach parking has taken another sharp turn after the state Department of Transportation revoked its approval of the island’s 2015 parking plan that barred nonresidents from using spaces on most streets.

The barrier island across from Mount Pleasant has been the subject of intense blowback after announcing plans in 2020 to eliminate hundreds of parking spaces near the popular beach — a plan the DOT also blocked.

The IOP town government already is facing a parking lawsuit, and statewide legislation over beach parking issues has been introduced with the IOP’s actions in mind. And now the DOT plans to take a broad look at parking plans it previously approved near public beaches.

That could include resident-only parking areas but also examining paid parking rates in places including Myrtle Beach, DOT Secretary Christy Hall told The Post and Courier.

Hall said previous state approvals of parking plans focused on traffic flow, without considering whether the plans were fair for all state residents. That was an error, she said.

Right now, Isle of Palms is the focus of the state’s attention, with Hall saying the parking rules there are potentially unconstitutional. That attention, and the plan to “revoke the full approval” of the parking plan that keeps nonresidents off neighborhood streets, prompted Isle of Palms City Council to vote unanimously Tuesday night to work with DOT on alternatives.

The decision came after a 100-minute executive session where council members discussed the issue privately with legal staff. The special meeting was held the day after the city received a letter from Hall.

“I am of the opinion that the 2015 plan has improperly designated a significant number of state-owned highway right of ways as ‘resident only parking’ potentially denying nonresidents their constitutional guaranty of equality and privilege,” Hall said in the letter to Isle of Palms officials Monday.

That’s a stark reversal of DOT’s opinion in 2015 when then-Secretary of Transportation Janet Oakley said the plan “appears to provide an excellent way for the city to address the issues of summer traffic.”

Most roads in South Carolina are state roads, and state approval is required for parking restrictions or paid parking.

A revocation of Isle of Palms’ 2015 parking plan could potentially allow nonresident parking across the island. Hall said DOT hopes to work with the city on a plan for angled parking on the land side of Palm Boulevard, which would restore some parking on the road closest to the beach.

Prior to Tuesday’s council meeting, Mayor Jimmy Carroll expressed frustration.

“They are basically cramming whatever they want down our throats,” he said. “They basically want us to come up with more parking or they will revoke our 2015 parking plan.”

Hall said she hoped to “trigger some dialogue” with Isle of Palms, and that’s what City Council agreed to Tuesday, faced with the states’ threat.

The Charleston Beach Foundation, a nonprofit group created in response to Isle of Palms’ parking restrictions in 2020, is “thrilled and appreciative” of DOT’s actions, the group said in a statement.

The group filed suit against Isle of Palms after the city in July 2020 temporarily prohibited nonresidents from using 763 parking spots, including all but 10 free parking spaces on the island. That case is pending.

Many of South Carolina’s barrier islands have struggled to manage traffic and parking during beach season as the populations of coastal areas have soared. Isle of Palms, for example, has about 4,300 residents. Mount Pleasant, which connects to the island by bridge, now has about 90,000.

“Our beaches are full in the summer and they want to cram more in there,” Carroll said. “I invite (state Sen. Larry) Grooms to come out in July and get a taste of what we are dealing with.”

Grooms, R-Bonneau, is the sponsor of legislation that would clarify the state’s existing right to regulate parking on state roads.

“We’re taking existing law, a Supreme Court decision and an Attorney General’s opinion, and wrapping it all up so that someone can point to that law,” Grooms said. “It’s making the law clear.”

He added, “No one is trying to open up all the streets on Isle of Palms for public parking.”

Hall said reviews of beach parking in other communities will follow, including a look at paid parking rates on state roadsides.

Isle of Palms raised parking meter rates by 25 percent in 2020. The city expects to collect about $1 million from parking kiosks and lots yearly, which is double the amount the city has said it spends on “beach visitor support” — parking management, beach service officers, beach cleanup, public restrooms and related capital costs.

Isle of Palms’ paid parking areas are on town-owned roads, but some beach communities do have paid parking on the sides of state roads.

“We’ve never really lifted the hood on the rates and looked at the equity issue prior to this happening with Isle of Palms,” Hall said. “I feel like we have an obligation to look at the rates that are being charged for parking in the right of way on state highways.”

She said that’s likely to include a look at rates charged in Myrtle Beach “at some point in time.”

As the clash between the island and the Transportation Department continues, highway officials are also working on a plan to improve bicycle and pedestrian access to Isle of Palms across the IOP Connector.

Carroll said the city just learned of that a week ago and he’s concerned the plan would reduce the emergency lane down the center of the bridge.

“That emergency lane is so critical, especially during the summertime,” he said.

The island and surrounding communities have encouraged ways to get to the beach that don’t require parking, including a shuttle bus from Mount Pleasant and encouraging bicycling. Carroll said any plans to improve bike and pedestrian access should focus on the north side of the bridge because it connects to sidewalks on the island.

As public waits for beach parking plan, Isle of Palms keeps talks behind closed doors

To the public, a future plan for beach parking on Isle of Palms may as well be buried in the sand.Isle of Palms City Council members this month spent 246 minutes — or four hours and six minutes — behind closed doors receiving legal advice about how to proceed in negotiations with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, according to a review of Isle of Palms City Council meetings.In the process, Isle of Palms City Council also might have violated the state’s open meetings law, which is meant to ensure ...

To the public, a future plan for beach parking on Isle of Palms may as well be buried in the sand.

Isle of Palms City Council members this month spent 246 minutes — or four hours and six minutes — behind closed doors receiving legal advice about how to proceed in negotiations with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, according to a review of Isle of Palms City Council meetings.

In the process, Isle of Palms City Council also might have violated the state’s open meetings law, which is meant to ensure transparency in government.

Area residents, hopeful beach-goers and at least one council member say the lack of transparency is eroding public trust in how Isle of Palms is handling beach parking, as tourism season quickly approaches.

The hours council members spent in executive session this month come after the state Department of Transportation revoked its previous approval of the barrier island’s 2015 parking plan.

The plan had largely banned nonresidents from using parking spaces on most streets near coveted beach access points. A Feb. 1 letter from Transportation Secretary Christy Hall sent to the mayor and council said the barrier island’s parking rules are potentially unconstitutional.

Isle of Palms, which is located across the Intracoastal Waterway from Mount Pleasant, has become the nexus of South Carolina’s beach parking drama that has sparked debates over who deserves access to state’s public sands.

The city is facing a lawsuit over its 2020 decision to temporarily block nonresidents from using more than 750 parking spots near the beach, leaving just 10 free spaces for visitors. A state bill about beach parking was drafted by state Sen. Larry Grooms, R-Bonneau, with the barrier island’s actions in mind.

After four City Council meetings this month, local leaders have yet to openly discuss what parking options might look like, as temperatures in the Charleston area begin to tick back up and the busy summer season approaches.

Council had an opportunity to talk about the matter in detail on Tuesday, with beach parking scheduled as a public discussion item on its agenda.

Instead, council members deviated from their agenda, added previously-public items to their executive agenda and unanimously voted to go into executive session, which is held out of the public’s view.

One of those discussion items was the city’s managed beach parking plan.

South Carolina Press Association attorney Taylor Smith said it was inappropriate for Isle of Palms City Council to indicate an agenda item was going to be discussed in public and then not do so.

By law, the council should have taken a specific vote on changing the beach parking discussion item on its agenda, Smith said.

“That did not happen here,” Smith said. “The public was unable to learn what they could anticipate their public body going behind closed doors to discuss.”

Instead, the public was forced to wait.

Multiple attempts to reach Isle of Palms Mayor Jimmy Carroll for comment were unsuccessful.

More than one-third of Tuesday’s City Council meeting, which lasted just shy of four hours, was spent in executive session. One council member could not hide his frustration as he prepared to enter the closed-door portion at 8:25 p.m. The meeting, held virtually, had started at 6 p.m.

“This is freakin’ ridiculous,” Councilman Ryan Buckhannon said moments before his video screen switched to black and an image of the city seal appeared on the meeting’s live-stream.

At 9:05 p.m., some 87 viewers were still watching the meeting on the city’s YouTube page. Andrea Schroder, 54, was one of them.

She has been following the issue of beach parking closely because the beach is more than a place to visit for her family.

“It grounds us. We have that to look forward to each week. People can run and scream as loud as they want to scream, throw sand, run up and down the beach and just let go,” she said.

Schroder and her husband are foster parents, and she said their family goes to the beach “weekly, if not several times a week.”

From her home in Mount Pleasant, Schroder kept the meeting’s live video playing on her cellphone as she put her kids to bed and did some laundry. She had hoped council would only be in executive session for 10 or 15 minutes.

It took 90 minutes.

“My husband and I, we were just watching and waiting — hoping they would give us something, and then we could at least know what the next steps need to be. But when they came back, it was so scripted,” Schroder said.

A motion made almost immediately after the council’s executive session — without any public discussion among council members — suggests city leaders are not throwing out their existing parking plan, despite state transportation officials’ criticism.

Councilman Randy Bell appeared to be reading the motion as he said it. “While affirming the current 2015 parking plan and subsequent amendments, we will continue to work with S.C. DOT to optimize available beach parking,” he said.

The motion received a quick second from Councilman Jimmy Ward and the mayor, who held up two fingers to signal he, too, had seconded the motion. Council then voted unanimously to adopt it without the agenda’s promised discussion.

When Schroder heard it, she had to go back and play it multiple times in the video, she said. She called it “a word salad.”

Reached by phone Wednesday to clarify what the motion meant, Bell said it was intended to uphold the city’s position that its 2015 parking plan remains “the valid ordinance” for the city.

“We affirmed the plan by a 9-0 vote that it is our plan of record. Now, that doesn’t mean we can’t add parking to it, and we are having constructive conversations with S.C. DOT about that,” Bell said.

Yet when Hall, the state transportation director, addressed City Council members Feb. 10 in a special meeting, she said the transportation department had made a mistake in approving the beach parking plan six years ago. She also said she did not believe the 2015 parking plan would be approved today.

When pressed about the confusion created by the city’s motion to keep supporting its 2015 parking plan and the rejection from transportation officials, Bell did not deny it.

“It can be very cryptic,” Bell said.

It has led to confusion and frustration this week among Charleston-area residents who watched Tuesday’s meeting thinking they would get a taste of what’s being discussed about beach parking.

“They say they’re going to work with S.C. DOT, but we haven’t heard any examples about how they want to work with them. They’re not giving us anything,” said Ellen Williams, a 47-year-old who lives in Mount Pleasant.

She watched the Isle of Palms City Council meetings this month and has grown tired of waiting for updates that never seem to come.

“It erodes the public trust in what they’re doing. I think the public deserves better communication, even if they can’t share legal counsel with the public,” Williams said.

Buckhannon, the councilman whose own frustrations were caught on a hot mic during Tuesday’s meeting, said he received multiple calls the day after the meeting. Many residents, he said, were upset.

“People want to be updated, to have a feeling of transparency and to know what’s going on. They want to know this is where the city stands, this is what we’ve done and this is what we’re doing,” Buckhannon said. “With any corporation or in any type of job, that’s the best way to operate, and I think that was taken away from the residents Tuesday night.”

He also said it wasn’t the first time a meeting took a turn from its stated agenda.

During the Feb. 10 special meeting, Buckhannon said he was under the impression that council would get to ask Hall some questions after her presentation.

“It was all the sudden moved into executive session to discuss that. I don’t get it,” Buckhannon said. “We have the secretary of transportation in front of us, which doesn’t happen very often. Why are we not afforded the opportunity to ask questions?”

In a statement provided to The State newspaper Thursday evening, Isle of Palms city administrator Desirée Fragoso said the city is working with Hall and the S.C. DOT team on “a unified strategy to optimize parking and traffic for beach visitors and residents.”

She added, “We expect to share a joint plan within the next month.”

This story was originally published February 26, 2021 8:54 AM.

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