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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in North Charleston, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in North Charleston, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – North Charleston’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in North Charleston, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in North Charleston, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in North Charleston, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in North Charleston, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in North Charleston, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in North Charleston, SC.

Refinancing in
North Charleston, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in North Charleston, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in North Charleston, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in North Charleston may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in North Charleston, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why North Charleston loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in North Charleston

SCDOT launches public info meetings for I-526 Lowcountry Corridor East study

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCIV) — The South Carolina Department of Transportation Monday launched a public information meeting online for the I-526 Lowcountry Corridor (I-526 LCC) EAST Planning and Environmental Linkages (PEL).The meeting will be available through December 1 and can be found on the 526 Lowcountry Corridor website.The corridor extends from Virginia Avenue in North Charleston to approximately U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant, which ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCIV) — The South Carolina Department of Transportation Monday launched a public information meeting online for the I-526 Lowcountry Corridor (I-526 LCC) EAST Planning and Environmental Linkages (PEL).

The meeting will be available through December 1 and can be found on the 526 Lowcountry Corridor website.

The corridor extends from Virginia Avenue in North Charleston to approximately U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant, which includes the Don Holt Bridge and James B. Edwards Bridge. It is one of South Carolina's most congested interstate corridors.

The study aims to improve travel time reliability and reduce congestion along the corridor.

“This public information meeting represents a valuable opportunity to receive public input on the potential solutions we are presenting” said SCDOT Project Manager Joy Riley. “With the amount of congestion along this corridor now, further compounded by the current trend of regional growth, it is now more important than ever to find effective solutions.”

Two in-person public information meetings are also planned, to give residents the chance to review study materials and discuss the project with staff. The in-person meetings will include the same materials in the online meeting, in both English and Spanish.

Project staff hope the meetings share how public input has been used to inform the concepts development and screening process, ask for input on the Reasonable Alternatives, outline the next steps in the project development process, and gather information on historic or cultural resources and any potential impacts.

Those open house meetings are scheduled for:

Temperature checks will be performed at all meetings and anyone with a temperature of over 100.4 will not be allowed to enter. The City of North Charleston currently requires masks inside their buildings. Masks are highly encouraged when not required, SCDOT said.

Comments may be submitted on the project website, by email to info@526LowcountryCorridor.com, by mail (Attn. Joy Riley, SC Department of Transportation, Post Office Box 191, 955 Park Street, Columbia, SC 29202-0191), or by calling the project hotline (843.258.1135). Comments must be postmarked or submitted electronically by December 1, 2021.

SCDOT said this study will be used as a vision for the corridor to guide future transportation improvement projects. Results of the PEL study will be carried forward into the next phase of the project development process, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process.

$100M+ North Charleston project includes Topgolf, hotels, apartments, offices and dining

NORTH CHARLESTON — A large mixed-use development valued at more than $100 million will bring a slew of new construction projects to the Centre Pointe area near Tanger Outlets.The area has been a magnet for retailers, hotels and dining establishments since it opened nearly 20 years ago, and plans presented to state environmental regulators show hundreds of thousands of square feet in new buildings along International and Tanger Outlet boulevards where land clearing is underway for a new Topgolf center that was announced earlier t...

NORTH CHARLESTON — A large mixed-use development valued at more than $100 million will bring a slew of new construction projects to the Centre Pointe area near Tanger Outlets.

The area has been a magnet for retailers, hotels and dining establishments since it opened nearly 20 years ago, and plans presented to state environmental regulators show hundreds of thousands of square feet in new buildings along International and Tanger Outlet boulevards where land clearing is underway for a new Topgolf center that was announced earlier this year.

The Uptown North Charleston development includes plans for a 175-room hotel, a 100-room hotel, 300-unit apartment building, three-level parking deck with 483 spaces next to Topgolf and five-story office building of 110,000 square feet.

Also planned are a 2,400-square-foot coffee emporium, three restaurants and four small retail sites.

A proposed 32,000-square-foot bowling venue has been scrapped and a second parking garage with more than 500 spaces that would be owned by the city is being considered for the site along International Boulevard, according to Lenn Jewel of the development firm RealtyLink.

Two smaller parcels west of Centre Pointe Drive at International Boulevard are set aside for other developments. They include apartments for corporate clients called Waterwalk and a retail facility.

Jewel valued the entire project at more than $100 million with different venues taking shape over the next few years.

Nearly 30 acres of the proposed project includes wetlands between Tanger Outlets and McCall Center, a retail site at International and Tanger Outlet boulevards that abuts the planned Uptown project.

Developers received approval last year from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to fill the site and offset the loss by acquiring 780 acres in Berkeley and Dorchester counties for remediation. A land-preservation easement with the Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust was finalized in May.

The Coastal Conservation League endorsed Uptown a few years ago as the project focused on an urban infill site rather than new “greenfield” development.

As part of the project, the city is poised to approve a special district for the site by the end of September that would direct half of the increased tax revenue from the completed development to help pay for roadwork, infrastructure and the planned garage. The rest of the money would go to Charleston County School District.

The city is not committed to the parking deck yet, but it is exploring the idea, Mayor Keith Summey said.

North Charleston also is exploring the idea of adding a second garage with 2,000 spaces near its coliseum and convention center complex by using Uptown’s tax revenues.

“It’s just too valuable a property to have asphalt on it,” Summey said.

At the Uptown site, vertical construction on the new Topgolf facility will begin in January, Jewel said. It’s scheduled to be completed in December 2022.

Work on restaurants, a hotel and apartments, some of which could open as early as 2023, will be underway next year as well.

“All of that stuff will be under construction, but it all won’t open at the same time,” Jewel said.

RealtyLink has been working on the Centre Pointe site for the better part of two decades. It includes Walmart, Sam’s Club, Tanger Outlets and numerous restaurants and retailers.

“We have a lot of retail out here,” Jewel said. “What we don’t have here is a lot of rooftops. We are creating this entertainment district tied to the coliseum and convention center.”

The developer’s aim is to create gathering places for people to attend before and after events at the two venues across International Boulevard and to offer amenities for the apartment renters.

“It would serve clientele that are here for happy hour and dinner after work or a place where you could tailgate before a hockey game or get a drink or a bite to eat later,” Jewel said.

Both Jewel and Summey expect the Topgolf attraction to be a major draw for the development. Summey said he was impressed when he visited the company’s existing facility in Myrtle Beach.

“It’s a very busy place,” he said. “It’s something that caters to all people.”

Jewel said the Uptown project is more vertical and dense than existing nearby development and some of it will be upscale.

“It will look more urban and more downtown,” he said.

Summey called the new development “a huge plus” for the city.

“It’s tax money for the future, and we are developing what we can and keeping it centralized by adding new life to what is already there,” the mayor said.

One part of the project that had been on the drawing boards for several years is no longer there.

A proposal to put a pedestrian bridge across International Boulevard has been axed because the ramps would have cut into the parking lot.

“It didn’t fit in a practical manner,” Jewel said. “It raised more concerns than it solved.”

In its place, a planned new intersection with traffic lights will be built.

A new street called Veras Way will intersect with International west of McCall Center while a second new street called Topgolf Way will begin off Centre Pointe Drive and end at Tanger Outlet Boulevard between McCall Center and a new parking deck next to Topgolf.

North Charleston targets $25M for sidewalks, other infrastructure improvements

NORTH CHARLESTON — Councilwoman Virginia Jamison carefully walks the thin shoulder that runs beside ditches along Deerwood Drive.The residential road, used often by commuters as a cut-through, lacks sidewalks. Jamison thinks not only about her safety but also the safety of her constituents, such as the students who use the road to access school buses.“If they had sidewalks, they’d be on the sidewalks and not in the street,” Jamison said.The lack of sidewalks is prevalent throughout North Charlesto...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Councilwoman Virginia Jamison carefully walks the thin shoulder that runs beside ditches along Deerwood Drive.

The residential road, used often by commuters as a cut-through, lacks sidewalks. Jamison thinks not only about her safety but also the safety of her constituents, such as the students who use the road to access school buses.

“If they had sidewalks, they’d be on the sidewalks and not in the street,” Jamison said.

The lack of sidewalks is prevalent throughout North Charleston’s older communities. Many of the neighborhoods, like Deerwood, were built long before 2000, which is when the city began requiring new development to include sidewalks. The city is making an effort to address the issue. It plans to use $25 million worth of proceeds from a recent bond sale to finance infrastructure improvements. New sidewalks are top priority for many council members, though pedestrian crossings and drainage improvements have also been discussed.

Some community leaders are glad to see progress on the horizon, though they also urge the city do more to address neighborhoods’ infrastructure needs.

The money will be split into $2.5 million for each of North Charleston’s 10 City Council districts. Plans are still in the early stages. The city doesn’t know yet how many square footage of sidewalks the project will entail. Planning and public works staff are meeting with council members to discuss infrastructure improvement options. The city also hasn’t consulted yet with S.C. Department of Transportation, which owns many of the roads in the city. The city will need permits from DOT for sidewalk installation on state-owned roads.

DOT said North Charleston efforts align with the agency’s Complete Streets policy. The policy requires DOT to work with regional transportation partners to include walking needs as part of regional plans.

“DOT looks forward to working with the North Charleston leaders to improve pedestrian accommodations within their city,” said spokesman Pete Poore.

What’s important is that the funds are in place, said Mayor Keith Summey.

“The money is there,” Summey said. “That’s always the key factor. We’re meeting with City Council members now and looking at projects they want and getting a cost analysis on those projects.”

Increasing connectivity

The money isn’t enough to to cover an entire community with new sidewalks. That’s why the city planners have been looking mainly at increasing connectivity throughout neighborhoods by filling in existing sidewalk gaps.

″(Council members) don’t have enough money to do a whole neighborhood,” said Deputy Planning Director Megan Clark. “During discussions, we were focusing on proximity to corridors, bus stops and schools. ... As we create options for (council members), that’s an opportunity for them to go back to neighborhood meetings and talk about options and what is the overall best interest of the neighborhoods.”

Having sidewalks that lead to schools should be a top priority for council members, Summey said.

The mayor said the city has maintained sidewalks and created new ones as best as it can as funds have been available. This has been a challenge. Summey pointed out that the city in the 1990s annexed a number of neighborhoods that had seen little investment, such as Union Heights, Accabee, Dorchester Terrace and Dorchester Waylyn.

The communities, which are predominately Black, lack sufficient number of pathways to properly accommodate pedestrians.

Some of these neighborhoods can’t accommodate sidewalks. In Union Heights, for example, there isn’t enough right of way around the neighborhood’s slim streets. Sidewalk installation would require use of private properties. In Union Heights, the city will likely focus on other improvements, such as fixing drainage issues, Summey said.

But wherever feasible, the city should address the need for walkable paths, said Omar Muhammad, executive director of the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities.

Not only do sidewalks provide people a safe path to move about in their neighborhoods, but the infrastructure also promotes healthy lifestyles, Muhammad said. Health disparities often exist in neighborhoods that lack pathways that safely accommodate walkers and cyclists, he said.

“You see (health disparities) existing in those communities because of the lack of that type of infrastructure,” he said.

For Councilman Michael Brown, safety is the top concern. He has hopes to add sidewalks in Accabee and Dorchester Terrace.

“When folks are walking in a lot of these areas, they’re walking in the streets,” Brown said. “That’s a safety issue.”

‘Tale of two cities’

Not all neighborhoods lack sidewalks, particularly the city’s newer communities. The Wescott community off Dorchester Road includes sidewalks that provide safe pathways to subdivisions and a shopping complex.

“We all know when it comes to sidewalks, we have a tale of two cities,” said Councilman Ron Brinson said.

The funds are a step in the right direction, but more can be done to improve quality of life in older neighborhoods, Jamison said.

Deer Park, created in the 1940s, today is populated with over a thousand homes. The neighborhood, like all others, could benefit from a North Charleston livability study, Jamison said.

Such a study would survey residents in all of the city’s neighborhoods to determine the communities’ needs, she said. It would also that no neighborhood is ignored, Jamison said.

“Deer Park has been left behind in so many ways,” Jamison said.

Brinson is concerned about how growth is impacting North Charleston neighborhoods in Dorchester County, an area that’s been one of the fastest-growing sections of the city. The Wescott community has seen increased cut-through traffic. Commuters use Wescott and Patriot Boulevards, originally built as neighborhood roads, to avoid gridlock along Dorchester Road.

Brinson fears the problem will worsen as a number of road projects loom on the horizon, including Charleston County’s Palmetto Commerce Interchange.

“We’ve got to do the best we can to protect the neighborhood ambiance,” he said.

As North Charleston moves forward with its infrastructure plans, Muhammad thinks the city should also engage with residents about why the infrastructure improvements are needed.

Particularly in low-wealth areas that haven’t seen significant investment, improvements could raise concern about gentrification, Muhammad said.

“I like that the city is allocating some funds towards infrastructure improvements,” he said. “But concurrent with that work, they need to reach out to the community to lessen concerns around gentrification.”

Meanwhile, the city will work to help ensure its neighborhoods have safe paths to walk and run.

A Walk to Remember: Daughter joins the fight to end Alzheimer’s in memory of father

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – A walk to remember those who lost their lives to a deadly disease. Nina Sossamon-Pogue joined the fight to end Alzheimer’s in memory of her father.“We got really close actually when he got Alzheimer’s because we spent so much time together,” said Sossamon-Pogue.She says her dad was a stern sailor in the Navy, but she met a different side of him when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.“He got sort of funny, he had a sense of humor, which he didn&rsqu...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – A walk to remember those who lost their lives to a deadly disease. Nina Sossamon-Pogue joined the fight to end Alzheimer’s in memory of her father.

“We got really close actually when he got Alzheimer’s because we spent so much time together,” said Sossamon-Pogue.

She says her dad was a stern sailor in the Navy, but she met a different side of him when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

“He got sort of funny, he had a sense of humor, which he didn’t have much that I remembered,” said Sossamon-Pogue.

Her father started having difficulty completing everyday tasks and that’s when Sossamon-Pogue knew something was wrong.

“He came about without saying anything and it knocked me off the boat cause I was standing there talking to him and he just did it right as we were talking and it was that moment when I realized, okay, we knew he was struggling to remember the normal seas of things,” said Sossamon-Pogue who was in denial after his Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

“You just kind of lean in and enjoy what it is, the new kind of relationship you have with this new person,” said Sossamon-Pogue.

She says there are some stories where you can capture the moment to create new memories.

“Some days I would go in and see my Dad and he would think he was on an aircraft carrier and I would be there for about five minutes after dinner or something on the way home from work and he’d be like you gotta go. I was like I just got here and he’d say well it’s my night to muster so you need to get going I’ve got work to do and I would go okay well good luck with that have a good one and I would leave. Muster’s when you count the heads to make sure nobody jumped, fell off the ship and I was like we wouldn’t like to lose one of these old people,” said Sossamon-Pogue.

Right now more than six million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s and to recognize those who are living with the disease or have passed away the Alzheimer’s Association is hosting a Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

“They give you a flower that has a certain color on it whether you’re a caregiver or whether you have Alzheimer’s,” said Sossamon-Pogue.

Flowers carried by someone committed to ending the disease.

“Whether you’re walking in memory of someone and they do this garden event at the beginning and everyone holds up their flowers and their pinwheels and they spin. It’s magical,” said Sossamon-Pogue.

The Charleston Walk to End Alzheimer’s will take place Saturday, October 16th at Riverfront Park.

For more information on the walk click here.

North Charleston woman recalls how boxing helped her ahead of match in Florida

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Taking up boxing as a 42-year-old woman takes guts. North Charleston’s Sterling Pickett needed boxing to show her that she has that mettle.“You don’t know what hitting a heavy bag, what therapy it is," says Pickett, who is now 43 years old. It will all culminate in a real live boxing match on October 23 in Tampa, Florida. And the journey started one year ago.Pickett took up boxing after meeting trainer Chris Wells at Gold’s Gym on Ashley Phosphate Road. The rest...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Taking up boxing as a 42-year-old woman takes guts. North Charleston’s Sterling Pickett needed boxing to show her that she has that mettle.

“You don’t know what hitting a heavy bag, what therapy it is," says Pickett, who is now 43 years old. It will all culminate in a real live boxing match on October 23 in Tampa, Florida. And the journey started one year ago.

Pickett took up boxing after meeting trainer Chris Wells at Gold’s Gym on Ashley Phosphate Road. The rest is history.

“We work out in his garage at 100 degrees," Pickett said. "It’s pretty grueling. Never trained for anything like this in my life.”

But, to get to the top of the mountain, you've got to start at the bottom. Wells recalls the woman who arrived last year. He saw the woman he trains now, even though they're two completely different people.

“In the case of Sterling, she literally was broken, I think she was trying to find herself. She dealt with some stuff in the past that affected her mentally and physically," Wells said. "She sat in front of me from the first day we did orientation, this is a person that was lost, was searching for something to help her, like she was in a dark room looking for the doorknob to get out.”

Pickett tells us she has anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. "It’s not something you normally would think of- boxing. But, when you hit that bag, it’s an all-over body experience. The release it does, the tension it releases," Pickett said. "I was a runner, when I would run, you could think about problems when you are running, what’s on your mind or whatever is bothering you, but when you are in here, you can’t think of anything else but boxing.”

This isn’t just a boxing road trip for Pickett. Wells will coach her, but will box as well. “We’ve been sparring since October," Pickett says. "He is the one that believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself, always encouraging and pushing you. Making the impossible possible.”

Wells emphasizes that Pickett is really good and the sky is the limit. Sometimes, all you need in life to start a new one, is someone to lean on -- and to beat up.

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