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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in Kiawah Island, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Kiawah Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – Kiawah Island’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Kiawah Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Kiawah Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in Kiawah Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Kiawah Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Kiawah Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Kiawah Island, SC.

Refinancing in
Kiawah Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Kiawah Island, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Kiawah Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Kiawah Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Kiawah Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Kiawah Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Kiawah Island

How South Carolina’s Kiawah Island strikes a balance between tourism and conservation

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

Potential travelers should take local and national public health directives regarding the pandemic into consideration before planning any trips. Travel health notice information can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's interactive map showing travel recommendations by destination and the CDC's travel health notice webpage.

This AAA five-diamond property has 255 guest rooms and suites, as well as multiple dining venues and direct beach access. Rooms from about $240.

Run by the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, this 1.5-hour boat excursion takes guests through creeks and marshes in search of the island’s native bottlenose dolphin population. $450 for up to six passengers.

Situated on the west end of the island, this ocean beach offers the only public access on Kiawah. Amenities include lifeguards, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, outdoor showers, a snack bar and a picnic area with grills. Parking $5 to $15 per vehicle.

Guests can ask resident wildlife biologists about the local ecology and visit with some of the native and nonnative species, such as diamondback terrapins and a 10-foot-long Burmese python. The center’s gift shop sells handcrafted items made by local artists. Free.

Walk or bike this one-mile scenic trail that extends over the marsh to a lookout tower. Part of the larger Kiawah Island bike trails system, which covers about 30 miles, this trail is suitable for all ages.

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Kiawah Island celebrates second annual 'Save Kiawah Bobcats Week'

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Once on the decline, the Kiawah bobcat population is making a comeback.It all started about four years ago when biologists noticed a change. The main reason- anticoagulants in rodenticides.“The primary cause for the decline was direct mortality from basically bobcats bio-accumulating these anticoagulants in their system, basically causing them to die," said Town of Kiawah Biologist Jim Jordan.However, this year there have been some positive trends in the population. One of th...

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Once on the decline, the Kiawah bobcat population is making a comeback.

It all started about four years ago when biologists noticed a change. The main reason- anticoagulants in rodenticides.

“The primary cause for the decline was direct mortality from basically bobcats bio-accumulating these anticoagulants in their system, basically causing them to die," said Town of Kiawah Biologist Jim Jordan.

However, this year there have been some positive trends in the population. One of those trends show two of the three female bobcats with collars have successfully had kittens- something they did not see last year.

“This year, our survival rate for the cats is 83%. So five out of six that we captured this past winter are still alive. Whereas in the prior two years, our survival rates were between 25 and 33%. So we've almost tripled or quadrupled the survival rate,” said Jordan.

People who live and work on the island have seen the bobcats and explain how beneficial the predators are to the environment around them.

“I was here about a week and a half ago coming into work about 9:30 and I encountered a bobcat mother and she was kind of walking along the edge of the parking lot and was looking for food. This is probably about first time I’ve ever personally seen one in my life," said resident Bill Kufner.

“These encounters are actually a good sign that the environment's not being changed because of the buildings and stuff going up. I think it has a big environmental impact to have a predatory animal on the island other than the American alligator that we have here," he said.

Kiawah town council created a campaign that allows residents to take a pledge to not use rodenticides.

“it is a voluntary program and when they pledge, they become what we call a Bobcat Guardian and Save Kiawah Bobcats Week is actually just a continuation of being able to put the information out there and make people aware of it every year," said Stephanie Braswell, Town of Kiawah Communications Manager.

This is the second annual Save Kiawah Bobcats Week, which has been deemed the second week of October. Be sure to follow Town of Kiawah on social media to see rare footage and to take the pledge.

Jim's Caddie Corner: A terrific season on the local links

It has been a great golf season and there is still some nice weather in the forecast. However, there are some cool days ahead and Mother Nature has plans for the near future. This is the perfect time to plan a golf getaway down south. So many golfers enjoy traveling to Florida for a golf vacation but there are some great destinations in South Carolina and Georgia that you may want to consider over the next three to four weeks if you can get away.The weather in the Southeast is still very nice with temperatures in the 70s. That is cert...

It has been a great golf season and there is still some nice weather in the forecast. However, there are some cool days ahead and Mother Nature has plans for the near future. This is the perfect time to plan a golf getaway down south. So many golfers enjoy traveling to Florida for a golf vacation but there are some great destinations in South Carolina and Georgia that you may want to consider over the next three to four weeks if you can get away.

The weather in the Southeast is still very nice with temperatures in the 70s. That is certainly pleasant weather to play golf and enjoy other outdoor activities. Even when the weather dips down into the 60s, you can play lots of golf and enjoy a stroll along the beach. There are lots of good deals on flights to Myrtle Beach, S.C.

They are still offering flights from Manchester for a few more weeks with some very good prices. Otherwise, Spirit Airlines also offers direct flights from Boston to Myrtle Beach. You can even travel to Logan International Airport by bus with Concord Coach Lines from the Eastern Slope Inn in North Conway. It is a comfortable and convenient way to get to the airport, without dealing with traffic and parking. The bus service brings you directly to the airport terminal.

There are a variety of golf courses and accommodations in Myrtle Beach, they have more ranked golf courses there than any other U.S. destination. The Dunes Golf and Beach Club, Caledonia Golf and Fish Club, True Blue Golf Club, King’s North at Myrtle Beach National, Moorland Course at Legends Resort, Grand Dunes Resort Course and three courses at Barefoot Resort are amongst the best and most challenging courses in the area.

Visit barefootresortvacations.com and visitmyrtlebeach.com for more information on some of the golf courses that Golfweek ranks as Top Resort Courses.

Another great option is Charleston, S.C., with lots of great golf courses and excellent restaurants. If you want to experience southern hospitality at its finest, consider Charleston and enjoy the historical architecture in the downtown area. While you are in Charleston, Kiawah Island is a great day trip to play golf, it is about 45 minutes away. Kiawah Island is also a great destination, relax in low country, South Carolina.

Kiawah Island Resort is world-class and they hosted the 2012 and 2021 PGA Championship. It is a high-end resort that offers world-class accommodations, golf and 10 miles of beaches. The resort is award-winning and recognized with AAA Five Diamond and Forbes Five Stars ratings.

There is also Hilton Head Island in South Carolina, less than one hour from Savannah, Ga. It is one of the premier golf destinations in the country. Visit hiltonheadisland.org and consider a stay and play package. This would probably save you money on greens fees. The golf courses there are very good, the prices vary by course. There are fewer crowds, the temperatures in October-November are in the 60s and low 70s during the day. That is great weather to play golf, especially since we are used to cooler temperatures in northern New Hampshire.

Continuing further south into Georgia, Jekyll Island offers four golf courses, three of which are municipal courses and affordable. If you are looking for a quiet getaway, with peace and serenity, this might be the perfect place for you to enjoy golfing and relaxing. Check out www.jekyllisland.com for more information.

If you can get away for a trip to the warmer weather, you should be able to find some deals since this is a quiet time for these areas before Thanksgiving week. Enjoy reading up on these areas and consider even a long weekend or better yet a midweek getaway over the next few weeks. Lodging rates drop, fewer crowds and the golf courses often have midweek specials. Otherwise, put it on your list of things to do in February/March 2022 when the weather warms up again in the South.

The golf season is winding down here in the Mount Washington Valley. Here are some recent results and news from a few of the local golf courses.

Hale’s Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: Here are the winners of the Three Tee Tournament — first place Mike Albarelli, Barbara Plonski, Scott Matthews and Cathy Steesy. Second place Ed Chappee, Suzanne McCarthy, Tom Proulx and Mary Jane Proulx.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (207) 925-2462: Recently, Friends of Conway Rec held its golf tournament. It was a good turnout, with prizes awarded to both men and mixed division.

LKCC held its annual Cross-Country Scramble on Oct. 3. It was a rainy start, but the weather soon cleared. The event had a very interesting format for playing 9 holes. Just an example you tee off on 18 and hole out on 1. The few groups that played had a good time.

The last club event for the season is the Turkey Shoot Scramble on Oct. 17. Call the clubhouse to sign up. Lot’s of turkey-related prizes are awarded.

LKCC will be open until Oct. 31, weather permitting.

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: The final week of Don Ho finds the Par Tee team in first place at -25.

Team members sweeping the Spring and Fall competition were Chris Bates, Steve Piowtrow, Rick Storm and Andy Narducci. In second at -18 was the Chislas followed by the Jocular Jewelers in third at -17. The Switchback team and the Marteenies finished tied for fourth place at -14.

Ann Bennett and Chris Bates won the last long drive contest.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: The Cross-Country Tournament is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 24. Anyone interested in bringing a team please call the pro shop.

Indian Mound Golf Course, Center Ossipee, (603) 539-7733: The 13th annual Kennett Hockey Golf Tournament, held on Oct. 10. attracted a record of 30 teams. “It went really well,” reports Indian Mound’s Jonathan Rivers.

North Conway Country Club, Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-5244: Will be closing for the season on Oct. 31.

Omni Mount Washington, Bretton Woods, (603) 278-4653: The Mount Washington Resort Golf Club offers a variety of lessons and workshops to help golfers of all levels of ability improve their game. All clinic schedules are subject to change due to weather or other factors. Please contact the Pro Shop to book your lesson or for the latest details at (603) 278-GOLF (4653). Please check in at the Pro Shop at least 10 minutes before the start of the lesson.

Thank you to all the local area golf courses and their staff for working hard during this 2021 golf season. It is great that it was a busy season and we had some good weather. And thank you to all the golfers that supported the local golf courses all season.

“If you drink, don’t drive. Don’t even putt.” — Dean Martin

Let us know if you have any great local stories or photos that we can include in an upcoming column. Contact Jim at mcfadyengolf@outlook.com or Lloyd Jones at lloyd@conwaydailysun.com.

Jim McFadyen is a golf columnist and can be reached at mcfadyengolf@outlook.com.

Symphony Tour Of Homes To Make Grand Return

By The Charleston Symphony Orchestra for The Island ConnectionThe 2021 Symphony Tour of Homes on Kiawah Island, now in its 24th year, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 13. Susan Leggett, the 2021 Event Chair comments, “The Tour is a fun way to explore the beauty of Kiawah Island while supporting the Charleston Symphony Orchestra. The homes on the Tour feature dazzling architecture and gorgeous views of the Island.” The self-guided tour will showcase a variety of beautifully decorated homes, reflecting the varied interests and...

By The Charleston Symphony Orchestra for The Island Connection

The 2021 Symphony Tour of Homes on Kiawah Island, now in its 24th year, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 13. Susan Leggett, the 2021 Event Chair comments, “The Tour is a fun way to explore the beauty of Kiawah Island while supporting the Charleston Symphony Orchestra. The homes on the Tour feature dazzling architecture and gorgeous views of the Island.” The self-guided tour will showcase a variety of beautifully decorated homes, reflecting the varied interests and lifestyles of their owners. Music will be played by symphony musicians and talented music students in the homes. A variety of home architecture and designer styles will be included. And, while on the tour, guests will have an opportunity to shop for unique, design-inspired and one-of-a kind items from the Charleston Symphony Orchestra League’s (CSOL) exclusive SCORE collection.

The tour will be followed at 5 p.m. by a free concert presented by the Charleston Symphony Orchestra at the new West Beach Conference Center. Advance tickets for the Home Tour are $55 through Nov. 6 and will be available at csolinc.org. Tickets can also be purchased at Indigo Books in Freshfields Village or the Kiawah Island Municipal Center on Betsy Kerrison Parkway. Tickets will be sold the day of the event on Freshfields Village Green for $60 each. The Charleston Symphony Orchestra is one of the very few symphonies in America to continue offering live concerts to the public through the pandemic. They return this year with two exciting new concert schedules, classical and pop. All the proceeds from this event will support the Symphony and scholarships for talented student musicians in the Lowcountry. Guests will first pick up tickets and programs for the self-guided tour at Freshfields Village and then proceed to the homes and experience the beauty of various corners of Kiawah Island. The safety of tour guests, homeowners, volunteers and musicians is a priority. The CSOL will work within the set framework of requirements recommended by the CDC and local health organizations and will be consistent with the Town of Kiawah Island and the Community Association.

Compliance will be in place and enforced at all tour and celebration locations.

• Masks Required

• Social Distancing Enforced

• Flat Heeled Shoes Only

• No Handicap Access in Tour Houses

For more information, to purchase tickets, and to learn about sponsorship opportunities, visit csolinc.org.

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Some Kiawah Island businesses see boost from PGA Championship, others say ‘it’s a letdown’

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Many business owners and managers on Kiawah Island said Thursday they have seen more customers and more dollars coming into their shops and restaurants because of the PGA Championship.“A lot of foot traffic on and off the island and a lot of interest in terms of dining. It’s been great,” FortyEight Wine Bar And Kitchen’s Matthew Williams said.“More people out and about and less restrictions, so people are more willing to shop, spend some money and have a little fun,&rdq...

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Many business owners and managers on Kiawah Island said Thursday they have seen more customers and more dollars coming into their shops and restaurants because of the PGA Championship.

“A lot of foot traffic on and off the island and a lot of interest in terms of dining. It’s been great,” FortyEight Wine Bar And Kitchen’s Matthew Williams said.

“More people out and about and less restrictions, so people are more willing to shop, spend some money and have a little fun,” Margerite and Motte owner Laura Reed said.

Business owners welcomed golf fans with sales, extended hours, and more.

“We’re just trying to capitalize and just get the names out there of local, women-owned businesses, and it’s been a really great day already and it’s Thursday, so we expect the weekend to be super busy,” Noddy owner Helen Tucker said.

Some longtime business managers said this year’s event has exceeded their expectations compared to the PGA Championship’s last appearance on Kiawah Island in 2012.

“In 2012, they didn’t have a lot of infrastructure around here, not as much rather…so that allowed people to go off island in 2012. They would actually just drive by us after the tournament and go to West Ashley or downtown,” Hege’s Restaurant General Manager Scott Hudson said. “But with us this year, we’ve seen a very positive uptick. We were expecting 20 percent, but we are seeing actually a 25 to 30 percent increase.”

However, a bit further off Kiawah Island, other business owners said the event has been a bust after they increased staffing to prepare for what they expected to be a rush of customers this week.

“We’ve been excited about this since we opened in November 2019, and people have been asking us about it for that long,” The Hemingway owner Michael Norwood said. “It’s been a little bit of a letdown.”

Some think traffic from the PGA Championship may be to blame for driving their typical customers past their doors or away from the area altogether.

“People that are renting their houses, I’m sure, just stocked up on groceries, and they don’t want to leave the island because traffic is just a mess out here,” Kinfolk owner Kevin Nierstedt said. “It was just really hard to judge this week. It’s been good business but it’s hard to plan for.”

The true economic impact of the PGA Championship is still unknown with three full days of golf left.

A study from the College of Charleston had estimated a $200 million gain for the Charleston area before the coronavirus pandemic limited capacity on Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course.

Half of that was expected to come from direct spending, and it’s unclear just how those limited spectator numbers have changed the estimate.

Meanwhile, the other $100 million value from the projection was set to come from the media and marketing coverage for the event, and officials said that has not changed based on the spectator count.

Kiawah Island’s beauty is being broadcast all over the world with more than 175 hours of live coverage of the PGA Championship.

“It’s a public golf course. So, it’s something that you can watch the best players in golf come compete, and then you can come out and try it yourself,” Championship Director Ryan Ogle said. “To be able to be inclusive like that is a feather in our cap to host our championship at a public golf course.”

Bryan Hunter, the public relations manager for Kiawah Island Golf Resort, believes the exposure gained from the event will pay off for the Lowcountry’s tourism industry.

“The importance of tourism to the entire region economically and having the eyes of the world on, not only Kiawah Island, but on Charleston and the entire Lowcountry and seeing how beautiful it is…I think people will see it and say that looks like the kind of place I want to go visit,” Hunter said. “I think it will have a big impact for a lot of different reasons but certainly the tourism industry in Charleston.”

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