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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in Seabrook Island, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Seabrook Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – Seabrook Island’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Seabrook Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Seabrook Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in Seabrook Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Seabrook Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Seabrook Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Seabrook Island, SC.

Refinancing in
Seabrook Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Seabrook Island, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Seabrook Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Seabrook Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Seabrook Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Seabrook Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Seabrook Island

Earthquakes: A whole lot of shaking is going on in nearby Summerville

South Carolina experiences about 10 earthquakes each year. They usually register between less than 1 and up to 4.1 on the Richter Scale. With two dozen seismometers buried underground throughout the state, every tremor and quake are recorded. On Monday, September 27, at 12:49 p.m., USGS data reportedly detected a 2.9 magnitude earthquake located 5.6 miles north-northwest of Ridgeville in Dorchester County. In a video announcement, Dr. Steven Jaume, professor and geologist at the College of Charleston, reported that there was a second quake ...

South Carolina experiences about 10 earthquakes each year. They usually register between less than 1 and up to 4.1 on the Richter Scale. With two dozen seismometers buried underground throughout the state, every tremor and quake are recorded. On Monday, September 27, at 12:49 p.m., USGS data reportedly detected a 2.9 magnitude earthquake located 5.6 miles north-northwest of Ridgeville in Dorchester County. In a video announcement, Dr. Steven Jaume, professor and geologist at the College of Charleston, reported that there was a second quake minutes after the first one. He said that quake was a 2.0 magnitude aftershock. Nearly five hours later on that same day, at about 6:21 p.m., a third earthquake hit Dorchester County, this time in Summerville. This quake had a recorded magnitude 3.3 and occurred in the Wescott Golf Club off of Dorchester Road in Summerville. Residents throughout the Lowcountry, including portions of Berkeley County, reportedly felt the earthquake and hundreds of calls came in to local radio and television stations asking about it. No one has claimed any damage so far. No earthquakes were reported that day in Colleton County, but Colleton does sit on a fault line. Regardless, earthquakes are nothing new to this area. In 1886, Charleston experienced the worst earthquake in the entire eastern United States. Because of that incident, studies by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) found that South Carolina sits on a fault line, particularly near Charleston and specifically along the neighboring city of Summerville. That means that surrounding counties are susceptible to quakes. According to geologists, the crust of the earth is like a factory. Old crust is constantly melted and new crust is being made, and the continents are always floating on a river of melted rock. This movement causes problems…namely earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when rocks under the earth’s surface are being squeezed together until they pop up or collapse down, or are pulled apart causing a break. They may also be shifted and slide or grind from side to side. Then the rocks break. It can sound like an explosion or sonic boom. The shifting rock may not be very powerful under the surface, but as everything above it shifts too, it grows in velocity and noise. The break in the rock can then be felt and heard. Rocks break and when the rocks move past each near the earth’s surface, it is called a faulting: coastal South Carolina sits on a fault line. Another one runs across the northern most part of Colleton County. Unfortunately, much of the Lowcountry sits on sandy soil which acts like a liquid during a quake, pushing buried cables and pipes above ground.

It’s going to happen again While scientists still can’t predict earthquakes, they do know one thing…if an earthquake happened once in a certain area, it will happen again. And if a quake of magnitude 6 or higher destroyed Charleston and surrounding counties once, another one will definitely occur again. According to Jaume, 70 percent of South Carolina earthquakes are located around Ravenel-Adams Run-Hollywood; at Middleton Place-Summerville; and in Bowman. The August 31, 1886 earthquake of Charleston occurred at 9:51 p.m., registered 7.6 on the Richtor Scale, was felt from N.Y. to Cuba, lasted 35 seconds, killed 110 people, caused $23 million in damage (or $158.48 million present day), damaged 14,000 houses and destroyed 90 percent of all brick structures. The two epicenters were located 21 miles northwest of Charleston and in Ravenel, say historians and geologists from USGS. While more recent earthquakes in the Lowcountry have not been as devastating as the 1886 quake, they have been felt and some have caused minor damage. According to Dr. Joyce Bagwell, affectionately known as the “Earthquake Lady,” another major quake is imminent for this area. “We are past due for another major quake. As time goes by, the probability of the Lowcountry experiencing a major earthquake grows,” said Bagwell in a 1993 conference. Bagwell headed the Earthquake Preparedness Department at Charleston Southern University and monitored seismic activity in South Carolina for the United States Geological Survey for more than 20 years until her death in March 2021.

In all, there have been 18 recorded and large earthquakes in or near Charleston since 1903, all of which caused damage. Just in August of this year, there have been six recorded earthquakes Across South Carolina, with four additional earthquakes recorded in September. Three of those four were in Summerville last week.

Recorded earthquakes On January 23, 1903, houses were shaken violently in South Carolina/Georgia border near Savannah. On April 19, 1907, a quake affected Charleston and went across a 26,000 square kilometer area. On June 12, 1912, a stronger earthquake caused damage to chimneys in Summerville, impacting an area of about 90,000 square kilometers. On January 1, 1913, the Union County area was shaken with cracks in many brick buildings and chimneys damaged. On September 22, 1914, an earthquake hit the Summerville area, with reports of walls being displaced in local buildings. On October 20, 1924, Pickens County was the epicenter of an earthquake that shook most of South Carolina and western North Carolina, northeastern Georgia, and eastern Tennessee. On July 26, 1945, an earthquake centered in Lake Murray, west of Columbia, and was felt in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. No damage was noted. On November 19, 1952, moderately strong shocks occurred near Charleston. On October 20, 1958, moderate earthquakes awakened residents in Anderson and caused cracked and fallen plaster in walls. On August 3, 1959, a quake caused minor damage in Charleston, Summerville, and Wadmalaw Island. Chimneys were damaged and walls cracked in homes. On March 12, 1960, the earthquake epicenter was off the coast of South Carolina, impacting Augusta. On April 20, 1964, a strong quake was felt in Florence, Lexington, and Richland Counties. On May 19, 1971, several windows were broken in Bowman and Orangeburg from a magnitude 3.4 earthquake. On July 13, 1971, two small shocks, about 3 hours apart, were felt in western South Carolina. On November 11, 2002, areas near Seabrook Island, South Carolina experienced a magnitude 4.4 earthquake. There were no reports of damage or injuries. On December 16, 2008, a 3.6 magnitude earthquake occurred in Dorchester County. On Friday, February 14, 2014, an earthquake occurred in the midlands of SC. It was reported to have been a 4.1 earthquake.

Here’s your guide to what Kiawah and Seabrook islands have to offer

Just 25 miles from downtown Charleston, Kiawah and Seabrook islands are the destinations for anyone looking to escape the bustle of the city.The two barrier islands each offer world-class golf courses that have been featured in major sporting events. Anyone looking to live out their professional golf fantasy can find a home at The Kiawah Island Golf Resort’s Ocean Course. The resort has hosted the PGA Golf Championship tournament two times in 2012 and in 2021.The resort recently renovated all of its courses in preparation...

Just 25 miles from downtown Charleston, Kiawah and Seabrook islands are the destinations for anyone looking to escape the bustle of the city.

The two barrier islands each offer world-class golf courses that have been featured in major sporting events. Anyone looking to live out their professional golf fantasy can find a home at The Kiawah Island Golf Resort’s Ocean Course. The resort has hosted the PGA Golf Championship tournament two times in 2012 and in 2021.

The resort recently renovated all of its courses in preparation for the 2021 tournament, which brought thousands of fans to the island in late May. Now, they’re open to the public for $205 a player. This year, the resort also opened The Cottages at The Ocean Course, four two-story, four-bedroom lodgings for anyone looking to sleep overlooking the driving range.

Those looking for a golf membership should also consider the Seabrook Island Club. The club’s two courses, Ocean Winds and Crooked Oaks, are open to members, group outings and events.

The two islands aren’t just for golfers; they also feature world-class beaches. Kiawah alone has 10 miles of beaches. The Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission operates the Beachwalker County Park, the only beach on the island open to the public.

Seabrook’s Pelican and North beaches also offer views of the sunset and sunrise, although they are not open to the public. The rest of the Kiawah’s beaches are privately owned, so those looking for a longer stay should consider all-access options.

The Sanctuary at Kiawah Resort is one of the best options for a luxurious all-access stay.

The five-star hotel offers luxury amenities, including a spa, pools, a fitness center, shopping and more than a dozen restaurants, cafes and eateries. Travel + Leisure included the hotel on its 2020 list of top 15 resorts in the South.

Although much of the resort has returned to the pre-pandemic operations, the Sanctuary has maintained some COVID-19 precautions. The hotel is not offering a turndown service, although it has daily housekeeping. The hotel’s guest beach and pool services are reserved for guests at the hotel and have restricted seating.

The islands are also a great place to explore Lowcountry wildlife. Those looking to get up close to dolphins should visit the northernmost tip of North Beach during low tide at Seabrook or Captain Sam’s Inlet on Kiawah. Bottlenose dolphins are known to wash up on shore to strand feed, a technique the dolphins use to trap fish onto sandbars and shorelines.

Kiawah’s brackish and freshwater ponds are also home to alligators throughout the island. They can be seen laying on pond edges in an attempt to warm themselves in the sun.

The islands also serve as nesting ground for sea turtles. From mid-May through early August, the turtles are active at nesting anywhere from 100 to 150 eggs. Island patrol and wildlife officials work to protect the nests from human interference throughout the season.

MUSC Health plans new medical office building, free-standing ER on Johns Island

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — MUSC Health is looking to better serve the sea islands near Charleston and their inhabitants.The health care provider has plans to construct a 22,740-square-foot medical office building along with a free-standing emergency room.With this space, MUSC Health hopes to be more accessible to patients living on Johns Island, Kiawah Island and Seabrook Island. Officials cited the distance of the islands from the nearest hospital and their rapid population growth as some of the factors considered when ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — MUSC Health is looking to better serve the sea islands near Charleston and their inhabitants.

The health care provider has plans to construct a 22,740-square-foot medical office building along with a free-standing emergency room.

With this space, MUSC Health hopes to be more accessible to patients living on Johns Island, Kiawah Island and Seabrook Island. Officials cited the distance of the islands from the nearest hospital and their rapid population growth as some of the factors considered when choosing the site.

The new facility will be built at 1884 Seabrook Island Road on Johns Island. Construction is anticipated to start in August 2022 and the building should open to patients by the fall of 2023.

Leaders said the project is being made possible through a land donation from Kiawah Partners, valued at $4.85 million.

“After seven years of working side by side with MUSC to bring this important project to fruition, we could not be prouder to donate the six acres of land needed for the development and to continue our partnership with the MUSC team,” said Chris Randolph, Kiawah Partners. “This new facility will bring vitally important world-class medical care to Kiawah, Seabrook and the Sea Islands residents, which will only add to the exceptional experience that comes with living here.”

“People living in this area have to travel 30 or 45 minutes to reach the nearest hospital, sometimes more depending on traffic. That’s a big problem for someone having a stroke or cardiac event,” added Patrick J. Cawley, M.D., MUSC Health CEO and vice president for Health Affairs, University. “This new facility brings that care directly into the community. We’re extremely grateful to Kiawah Partners for helping to make that possible.”

Some of the amenities include four exam rooms, two trauma rooms, full lab services, CT scan services, radiology services and a helipad on the emergency room side. The medical office will house primary care, specialty care, telehealth pods, an onsite lab and diagnostic treatment, as well as physical and occupational therapy treatment rooms.

"The new medical facility will provide residents and visitors alike with convenient and rapid access to MUSC Health’s emergency care services, select outpatient services, and some of the nation’s top providers in primary and specialty care," MUSC Health stated in an informational handout provided to ABC News 4.

In total, the work is expected to cost around $24 million. MUSC is hoping to raise $15 million of that through private support.

McMillan Pazdan Smith, who is currently working on designs for a new MUSC Health hospital in rural Williamsburg County, will also design this project.

Lowcountry fire departments net nearly $1M from FEMA for equipment, training

U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn says nearly $1 million worth of federal funding will go to Lowcountry fire departments in diverse locations from Elloree to Charleston.Seven fire departments received funding through the Department of Homeland Security’s Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, the lawmaker announced in August. The money will be used to give Lowcountry firefighters updated tools and new training programs to better battle flames.“I am pleased to see these funds going to the hardworking firefighters throughout m...

U.S. Rep. Jim Clyburn says nearly $1 million worth of federal funding will go to Lowcountry fire departments in diverse locations from Elloree to Charleston.

Seven fire departments received funding through the Department of Homeland Security’s Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, the lawmaker announced in August. The money will be used to give Lowcountry firefighters updated tools and new training programs to better battle flames.

“I am pleased to see these funds going to the hardworking firefighters throughout my district who help protect and keep us safe,” Clyburn, D-S.C., said in a statement.

The Assistance to Firefighters Grant program awards money directly to fire departments and EMS organizations that are unaffiliated with a hospital. It helps them “enhance their response capabilities and effectively protect the health and safety of the public and emergency response personnel,” a media release said.

The majority of the grant money, more than $560,000, went to Charleston County Operations and Safety, according to the FEMA release.

All that money will go directly to the St. Johns Fire District on Johns Island, which was created by the state Legislature in April 1959.

The district is comprised of four barrier islands — Johns, Kiawah, Seabrook and Wadmalaw — covering a land mass of approximately 185 square miles.

Ryan Kunitzer, the fire marshal for St. John’s, said the much-needed funds will be used to give his team additional medical training.

“We are going to use this money to train 20 of our personnel to become EMTs and paramedics,” Kunitzer said. “It enables us to provide a larger number of services to our constituents. We’ll be able to provide a higher level medical service more rapidly.”

The money is crucial as Johns Island and the surrounding areas experience record levels of housing development and population growth.

Smaller amounts went to more rural fire departments, such as Whitesville Rural Volunteer Fire Department in Berkeley County. With the $73,000 the department received, the crew will be able to purchase around 25 more full sets of fire protection gear.

“This is fantastic news,” said Colt Roy, a spokesman for the Whitesville Rural Volunteer Fire Department. “One of our biggest challenges has been being able to outfit our new fireman. Now we can do that.”

Lebanon Fire Department Of Berkeley County in Ridgeville received $75,000 in federal money. Department Chief Nicky Sweatman said his team was in dire need of new radios, and that the grant was a godsend.

“We were using hand-me-down radios from the Berkeley County Sheriff’s,” Sweatman said. “We were in need of some new ones.”

The grant requires some of the departments to put up a small amount in matching funds, around five to 10 percent, as a requirement.

Clyburn said he was happy to see the money go to so many South Carolina fire stations.

“These funds will ensure that each fire department has the necessary tools to effectively respond to fire emergencies and will enable them to ensure the safety of their firefighters as well as those in the community they serve,” Clyburn said in a statement.

Bouts of heavy rainfall to douse Lowcountry through Sept. 22, could lead to flash flooding

Torrents of heavy rain and tidal flooding are expected to hit the Lowcountry this week, potentially bringing nuisance flash flooding to low-lying areas.The National Weather Service’s Charleston office issued a coastal flood advisory for Charleston and Colleton counties through the evening of Sept. 21 as widespread showers crawled over much of the state’s southern tip on Sept. 20. The weather service also issued a flash flood watch through the morning of Sept. 21.Just over 2.5 inches of rain had fallen in West Ashley...

Torrents of heavy rain and tidal flooding are expected to hit the Lowcountry this week, potentially bringing nuisance flash flooding to low-lying areas.

The National Weather Service’s Charleston office issued a coastal flood advisory for Charleston and Colleton counties through the evening of Sept. 21 as widespread showers crawled over much of the state’s southern tip on Sept. 20. The weather service also issued a flash flood watch through the morning of Sept. 21.

Just over 2.5 inches of rain had fallen in West Ashley by 6 p.m., and about 2.8 inches had fallen in Mount Pleasant, according to the weather service. Summerville also received about 2.8 inches in rain. About 1.5 inches hit North Charleston and downtown Charleston received less than an inch.

The Lowcountry was expected to see 2 to 4 inches of rain on Sept. 21, with some areas seeing higher amounts, according to the weather service. The combination of elevated high tides and the ongoing showers would create minor flooding, mainly in urban and coastal areas.

Blair Holloway, a weather service meteorologist, said heavy rain had been forecast to hit the tri-county area through the afternoon of Sept. 22. After that, the Lowcountry is forecast to have a dry latter half of the week, he said.

“Given how wet Charleston’s been today, we will continue to see the potential for flooding until Wednesday,” he said. “Minor flooding looks very likely. We could have significant flash flooding depending on how the rain hits.”

In downtown Charleston, a potential overlap of heavy rain with some coastal flooding could result in an enhanced flooding risk. Coastal areas, such as Kiawah and Seabrook islands, were expected to experience flooding, according to the weather service.

The heavy rain is a result of a wet weather pattern, which developed early Sept. 20 off the coasts of Beaufort, Colleton and Charleston counties, according to the weather service.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Peter was forecast to bring heavy rain toward much of the Caribbean, including the Bahamas, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

As of 5 p.m., the storm was around 150 miles northeast of the northern Leeward Islands, moving west-northwest at 14 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm recorded wind speeds of 50 mph.

There were no coastal watches or warnings in effect Sept. 20, but the system was forecast to continue moving west-northwest throughout the next couple of days. None of the U.S. mainland was in Peter’s path, according to the hurricane center’s most recent update.

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