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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in James Island, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in James Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – James Island’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in James Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in James Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in James Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in James Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in James Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in James Island, SC.

Refinancing in
James Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in James Island, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in James Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in James Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in James Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why James Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in James Island

Lowcountry yacht club keeps rule in place banning women from being members

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The James Island Yacht Club was founded in 1898. But more than 100 years later, the by-laws regarding its male-only policy have yet to change.According to a statement from the James Island Yacht Club, the female spouses of the members have become more “involved and are an integral part of the Club,” but they are not considered members.“The James Island Yacht Club is a family-focused social organization run by its membership as outlined by the Club by-laws. Potential new members o...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The James Island Yacht Club was founded in 1898. But more than 100 years later, the by-laws regarding its male-only policy have yet to change.

According to a statement from the James Island Yacht Club, the female spouses of the members have become more “involved and are an integral part of the Club,” but they are not considered members.

“The James Island Yacht Club is a family-focused social organization run by its membership as outlined by the Club by-laws. Potential new members of our Club must be sponsored by a current resident member. Our Club was founded in 1898 as a male-only organization and over time females have become more and more involved and are an integral part of the Club. Females of the Club have full access and use of all JIYC facilities and participation in all social activities.”

Females are only offered access to the Club facilities and able to participate in social activities if their male significant other is a member.

In 2020, the members of the club voted to potentially change the club by-laws to make women full members. But when the men voted, it did not pass.

“While this motion was thoroughly debated it did not garner the necessary % of votes required to change the Club by-laws. The by-laws govern our Club and changing them is the only way to change our membership practices. Proposals to change the Club by-laws are brought up from time to time, often taking multiple attempts to garner sufficient membership support for implementation.”

The Chair for the City of Charleston Commission on Women Jennet Robinson Alterman calls this discrimination.

“It’s discrimination, plain and simply,” Robinson Alterman said. “And although it is legal discrimination because it’s a private club and they’re pretty much allowed to do what they want to, just because it’s legal doesn’t mean it’s right.”

The CEO of South Carolina Women and Leadership Barbara Rackes says she is surprised to learn there are still clubs in South Carolina with these types of laws.

“What do you think about your daughters,” Rackes asked. “Are you going to tell her that in order for her to be a member she has to be married? Do you really want you daughter to be precluded from joining the club you like so much?”

As the by-laws of the club currently stand, no women will be able to vote on this matter until the men-only members vote to include them.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Two feet washed up on South Carolina beaches months apart. Now coroner has an ID

A right foot still inside a green and black running shoe was found off the coast of South Carolina last year. Five months later, county officials said, the left one surfaced in a different location.Now officials believe they have positively identified the owner.The feet belonged to 57-year-old Janet Robinson, who was last seen in...

A right foot still inside a green and black running shoe was found off the coast of South Carolina last year. Five months later, county officials said, the left one surfaced in a different location.

Now officials believe they have positively identified the owner.

The feet belonged to 57-year-old Janet Robinson, who was last seen in August 2020, Charleston County Coroner Bobbi Jo O’Neal told reporters during a news conference broadcast by WCBD on Wednesday. O’Neal said it took months of “advanced level forensic science” using DNA testing to find an ID.

Robinson’s death remains under investigation. Law enforcement and family members are asking anyone who might have information to come forward.

“They’re very saddened to learn that their loved one — their sister and their daughter and their mom — is never coming home,” O’Neal said of the family. “But, at the same time, there’s comfort in at least knowing there’s an answer.”

Officials said Robinson had likely been dead for at least four weeks based on the condition of the first foot that was found. She was last seen in the Charleston area on Aug. 3, 2020.

Her right foot was found in a “green and black On Cloud sneaker-type shoe” near Fort Sumter on Oct. 25, O’Neal said. On Cloud is a popular brand of running shoes, and Fort Sumter is located on an island in the Charleston harbor.

The coroner’s office sent a DNA sample from the foot to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification in Fort Worth about a week after it was found. O’Neal said they hoped to receive a DNA profile that could be uploaded into CODIS, the FBI’s national DNA database.

Then, on March 17, Robinson’s left foot in the same style sneaker was found on James Island.

Citing a “huge backlog in forensic DNA,” O’Neal said the chief deputy coroner began researching ways they could do some genetic DNA testing. The coroner’s office subsequently sent a DNA sample to a company in Texas for a genealogical profile.

Within three months, O’Neal said, they had a match.

The lab compared the sample to databases where people voluntarily upload their DNA and found someone they believed to be a sibling. Officials in South Carolina then reached out to the person, who confirmed they submitted a consumer DNA test in January 2019 and had a biological sister living in Charleston who went missing.

That sister was identified as Robinson.

According to the coroner’s office, Robinson was from Mississippi but moved to the Charleston area to be close to family. Law enforcement believes she lived in the Goose Creek area for a time but had moved to Charleston when she disappeared.

O’Neal said Robinson had been discharged from a local hospital before she went missing.

The two feet did not appear to be injured, and O’Neal said they likely became separated from the body by “natural processes.”

Feet have been known to wash up in the Pacific Northwest on a somewhat regular basis — at least 15 have been found on the shore of Salish Sea, Vox reported. That’s because human bodies come apart at the joints in the water, and sneakers serve as a kind of flotation device that can be easily wash them to shore.

Law enforcement is hoping to find additional remains and relying on tips from the public to help solve what happened to Robinson.

“At this point we’re sort of stuck, ” O’Neal said.

Anyone with information is asked to call coroner’s officer at 843-746-4030 or Charleston County Sheriff’s Department.

This story was originally published October 6, 2021 6:45 PM.

Lights go out on Lowcountry highways, SCDOT explains

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — You may have noticed some highway lights are out across the Lowcountry.It's an issue ABC News 4 has been reporting on since August of 2020, but the issue has not been resolved.On Thursday morning we saw highway lights out on I-26, I-526, The Ravanel Bridge and the James Island Connector."One thing that was a cause for co...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — You may have noticed some highway lights are out across the Lowcountry.

It's an issue ABC News 4 has been reporting on since August of 2020, but the issue has not been resolved.

On Thursday morning we saw highway lights out on I-26, I-526, The Ravanel Bridge and the James Island Connector.

"One thing that was a cause for concern was the long stretch on 526 between I-26 and Daniel Island. There's over 70 lights out in that area," said ABC News Traffic Expert Trooper Bob.

Trooper Bob said he has seen the issue grow over the last year and it's a danger for drivers during their morning and late night commutes.

"What if your family member was broken down at night time, raining and someone is approaching them at interstate speeds in an area that shout be lit, but it's not lit up," said Trooper Bob.

SCDOT said electrical components fail over time, and the SCDOT signal shop engineering handles all of the outages.

"Maintaining our highway lighting is a continuous effort, so those lights may go out from time to time due to the fact that it's outdoors and it varies by weather," said Brittany Harrior, Public Information Coordinator SCDOT.

SCDOT said electrical components fail over time, and the SCDOT signal shop engineering handles all of the outages.

They take all maintenance issues seriously, but sometimes there isn't a fast fix, SCDOT said.

"Time frames for repairs vary on each location. Median barrier light or bridge lighting requires more complex traffic control then shoulder mounted lighting," said Harrior.

Money also plays a factor.

"Therefore repairs are strategically targeted to balance cost effectiveness, and time effectiveness of the repair," said Harrior.

SCDOT said repairs come from the general maintenance fund and typically projects are grouped together.

"Repair work is usually balanced with other work that needs to be done. Like pothole patching, drainage maintenance, sign replacements and traffic signal repair. If lighting needs to be repaired, it is typically packaged in with another bigger project to encompass it all at once," said Harrior.

ABC News 4 asked SCDOT when the lights we reported out could be repaired. We are still waiting for answers.

Man charged with throwing Molotov cocktail at deputies, first-degree domestic violence

JAMES ISLAND — Authorities have arrested a man who barricaded himself inside a Briarfield Avenue home, accusing him of attacking his wife and then detonating a Molotov cocktail near her and sheriff’s deputies.The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office arrested Jonathan Andrew Hill, 36, on Oct. 8 and charged him with four felonies.Hill was charged with two counts of possession of an explosive device and one count of intentionally causing an explosion in an attempt to injure people or a building. He was also charged...

JAMES ISLAND — Authorities have arrested a man who barricaded himself inside a Briarfield Avenue home, accusing him of attacking his wife and then detonating a Molotov cocktail near her and sheriff’s deputies.

The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office arrested Jonathan Andrew Hill, 36, on Oct. 8 and charged him with four felonies.

Hill was charged with two counts of possession of an explosive device and one count of intentionally causing an explosion in an attempt to injure people or a building. He was also charged with first-degree domestic violence.

Hill was acting manic and throwing items in his house at 4 a.m. Oct. 8 and subsequently got into a verbal dispute with his spouse, according to an arrest warrant affidavit.

Hill pushed his spouse and stomped on her face and chest. He then hit her several times with a belt, ultimately strangling her with it, the affidavit said. The victim was able to run outside the house and seek help, it said.

If convicted of first-degree domestic violence, Hill could face up to 10 years in prison, according to the S.C. Code of Laws.

Deputies went to the James Island home at about 7 a.m. in response to reports Hill was violent toward his spouse. Deputies met the spouse outside the home when they arrived.

Hill had barricaded himself in the house, according to another arrest warrant affidavit. Moments after their arrival, Hill opened the front door and threw a flaming incendiary device, often referred to as a Molotov cocktail, in the direction of the spouse and deputies, the affidavit said.

The device exploded on the driveway near the deputies, the affidavit said. No one was injured, said Capt. Roger Antonio, sheriff’s spokesman.

Hill then escaped through the house’s back door. Deputies later searched the home and found two additional cocktails manufactured inside the residence, the affidavit said.

If convicted of intentionally causing the explosion to cause injury, Hill could face up to 25 years in prison.

Hill appeared for a bond hearing Oct. 9. He was denied bail on all charges. He is currently being held at the Charleston County jail.

Charleston and North Charleston were among the top 10 cities in the state with the highest number of people contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline during 2020, according to the S.C. Attorney General’s Office.

Leaders seek public input for Mark Clark Extension plans

This story was originally printed in the Sept. 6, 2021 issue of the Charleston Regional Business Journal.The daily commute from Johns Island to North Charleston had become so overwhelming that Bradley Taggart quit his job in 2020 to become a stay-at-home dad.Taggart is co-founder of Charlestonians for I-526, a group of now 11,000 island residents who formed in 2012 out of mutual commuter struggles. Together they advocate for the proposed Mark Clark Extension by commenting at meetings, researching and d...

This story was originally printed in the Sept. 6, 2021 issue of the Charleston Regional Business Journal.

The daily commute from Johns Island to North Charleston had become so overwhelming that Bradley Taggart quit his job in 2020 to become a stay-at-home dad.

Taggart is co-founder of Charlestonians for I-526, a group of now 11,000 island residents who formed in 2012 out of mutual commuter struggles. Together they advocate for the proposed Mark Clark Extension by commenting at meetings, researching and disseminating information to residents, primarily via Facebook.

“What we were seeing in the media as far as people opposing new roads, and what we were hearing amongst our neighbors, it didn’t match,” Taggart said. “The people wanted the roads, but some of the people and special interest groups did not.”

In the next 30 years, traffic on the Mark Clark and surrounding roadways is expected to get worse.

By 2050, Johns Island’s population could grow by 206%, and a trip from the intersection of River and Main roads to Charleston International Airport could take 134 minutes, according to a 2019 Cultural Historical Activity Theory model.

Charleston County Deputy Director of Public Works Richard Turner and Jae Mattox, a S.C. Department of Transportation program manager for the project, addressed the traffic — and a solution — on Aug. 19. After decades in the making, plans for Alternative G, a proposed version of the Mark Clark Extension, are moving forward and the public feedback period is open through Oct. 15.

Mattox and Turner said they are eager to hear specifically from the people living in the region.

“This project’s been around for so long and my fear is that people are immune to it,” Mattox said. “When that happens, it’s hard for us to accomplish what we need to accomplish during this period.”

The proposed Alternative G is a 9.5 mile, four-lane parkway with speed limits between 35 and 45 miles per hour. Of the extension, 6.1 miles will be a bridge structure over the Stono River, reducing the project’s footprint and wetland impacts.

While the goal is to have as little interruption as possible, Alternative G still would require seven business relocations and 13 residential relocations, Mattox said.

There is no projected cost yet for Alternative G as leaders await final plans, but the estimated total in 2019 was between $725 million and $772 million.

The 9.5-mile route will have two connection points extending Interstate 526. Connector A will be the western link between the Mark Clark Extension and River Road, while Connector B will link the eastern side.

Extension plans also include a 12-foot-wide multi-use path for pedestrians and bicyclists that will connect the West Ashley Greenway and James Island County Park.

On average, the extension could save more than 6,946 commuter hours a day or 98,000 driving miles, according to a 2010 environmental impact study. That’s roughly 36 million miles driven annually by commuters and more than $20 million in savings each year for gas and vehicle wear and tear, per IRS mileage calculations.

“The road would pay for itself in 16 years, just based on the time value that it would save,” Taggart said.

Many alternatives
Alternative G is one of 39 plans that were originally proposed 10 years ago. The 2021 version combines two previous ideas together using comments from residents, elected officials, planning agencies and more over the years, Mattox said.

“Public involvement is so important and has impacts on the project,” Mattox said.

Public feedback also played a part in relocating plans for the intersection of Connection B, shifting the multi-path to the county park entrance, and upgrading the original intersection of Maybank Highway and River Road.

If completed, the extension could cut the commute from River and Main roads to the airport by 94 minutes, or from the same location to Medical University of South Carolina from 114 minutes to 19, per CHAT calculations.

“It’s a lot of commuter traffic that’s going in and out of those areas each day,” Turner said. “When I look at traffic needs, that’s really the thing that sinks in to me.”

Getting to work
Between 2015 and 2050, employment growth in Charleston County is expected to increase 57% to 415,637 jobs, according to CHATS.

Taggart agreed the extension would be valuable for Johns Island, Kiawah Island, Seabrook Island and Wadmalaw commuters.

“All of our neighbors are in support of (the extension) because most of them work and have small children and mobility is high on their list, whereas some of the older residents of the island, mobility is not a priority,” Taggart said. “They lead a different lifestyle than most of the newer residents. And they’re kind of clinging to the past.”

Taggart understands the concerns. He too grew up in a rural area and saw it suburbanized, but the growth is a real issue, he said.

“Johns Island as the crow flies is five miles from downtown Charleston,” he said. “So to think any city five miles away from the fastest growing city is going to stay country is not realistic. It’s filling in on Johns Island, and we have to just accept that reality.”

Not all residents wanted to be on the record about their opinions about plans for the Mark Clark Expressway. One James Island resident, like Taggart is for the extension, but he doesn’t believe Alternative G is the finite solution. He suggests the project be broken up into two parts, focusing first on Johns Island. Leaders can then determine costs and see if the extension works.

“They’re trying to give us something that they’re not even sure is going to alleviate all these troubles,” he said.

Some are concerned Alternative G will create more of a chokehold at Maybank Highway and Main Road because enough hasn’t been done to keep up with growth and infrastructure needs.

“You’re going to cruise over the bridge and still sit in traffic when you get off,” one person said. “If you bring a bunch of cars over to a road that’s not properly built to handle it, it’s going to be another traffic jam.”

Speaking up
Following Alternative G’s public comment period, an environmental-impact statement will be drafted, hopefully by spring 2022, Mattox said.

If the project receives federal and state approval on schedule summer 2022 and winter 2023, the final design would come 2023 and construction could kick off in 2024.

For those interested, there is a virtual public hearing room on the website at www.scdotmarkclark.com to attend meetings. Public can also comment online, email or write to Turner and Mattox at P.O. Box 191, Columbia, S.C. 29202.

“Hopefully we’ll be able to get comments, we’ll be able to get concerns addressed. … If we don’t get the feedback, we don’t know what we don’t know,” Mattox said.

On Sept. 14, a public hearing was held at Essex Village Church in West Ashley with an informal session from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. A formal presentation and verbal comment session began at 6 p.m.

“This is totally not a done deal,” Mattox said. “That’s part of the reason we’re going to the public because we’ll take everything that we get from the public, all the comments, all the concerns, ns and we’ll address those as best we can.”

Reach Teri Errico Griffis at 843-849-3144.

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