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Dan Crance: Your Mortgage Man | 134 E Richardson Ave Summerville SC 29483

With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in Park Circle, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker’s ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Park Circle, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance – Park Circle’s most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you’re looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Park Circle, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I’m here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I’d rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you’ve selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year
Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Year

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Park Circle, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender

Home Financing in Park Circle, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you’re a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Park Circle, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Park Circle, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

Home Financing

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan – This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won’t change.

FHA Loan – If you’re not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan – This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Park Circle, SC.

Refinancing in
Park Circle, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home’s equity into cash. If you’re interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Park Circle, SC – Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don’t mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you’re like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It’s crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Park Circle, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.

If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.

In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.

The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Park Circle may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Park Circle, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Park Circle loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Park Circle

Developers to transform 80-year-old ice processing facility into office park

By Jenny Peterson Contributing writerAn 80-year-old abandoned ice processing plant on Spruill Avenue in North Charleston is getting new life as developers have broken ground to redevelop it into a modern and flexible office park.Located just one mile away from Park Circle, the complete buildout of The Ice House at Park Circle development will add 46,000 square feet of adaptable use office space among three, two-story buildings — a renovation of the former ice processing building and two new buildings ...

By Jenny Peterson
Contributing writer

An 80-year-old abandoned ice processing plant on Spruill Avenue in North Charleston is getting new life as developers have broken ground to redevelop it into a modern and flexible office park.

Located just one mile away from Park Circle, the complete buildout of The Ice House at Park Circle development will add 46,000 square feet of adaptable use office space among three, two-story buildings — a renovation of the former ice processing building and two new buildings that will be added to the property.

Three buildings on the site will be demolished to make way for the contemporary office buildings. Developers are using state tax credits through the S.C. Abandoned Buildings Revitalization Act for the renovation of the ice house processing facility.

Pat Marr of Cobalt Property Group and Kevin Klemm of Paragon Commercial Development are partnering on this venture. The project is being designed by The Middleton Group architecture firm, which has designed projects including Blue Acorn, the Lumberyard, The Refinery and The Morris.

“It was a big move for a commercial real estate company to come off the peninsula,” said Jim Garret, market leader at Colliers, which will lease space in the new development. “We are committed to Marr’s vision, and what he’s doing with the property, and committed to Park Circle’s growth and all the dynamics going on down there. We just think it’s the right place, right time.”

All three buildings will be adaptive use, built-to-suit tenants. Developers anticipate phase one of the park — 23,000 square feet in the former ice processing facility — to open by Thanksgiving 2021. The second phase, another 20,000 square feet in new construction, is set to be open early 2022.
The development is already pre-leased to regional and national tenants, the developers said.

“The whole project is 75% committed in pre-leasing,” Marr said.

Tenants will be Samet Corp., The Middleton Group and Colliers, which will move into suites ranging from 3,000-8,000 square feet in the ice processing facility with open concept areas, glass and original brick.

“We are restoring the outside of the processing facility with the original ice house logo and preserving the interior. We are converting the loading dock on the front of the building, which will be Samet’s main entrance,” Marr said.

Moving forward on an office park development during the COVID-19 pandemic — where many employees were forced to work from home — was a risk, but developers are forecasting that the office space market will bounce back and embrace build-to-suit spaces with creative configurations.

“I think big office users who have gone completely remote are going to need to have ‘touchdown’ spaces for their people, like multiple conference rooms and areas for teams to work,” Garrett said. “With this development, you can get 8,000-10,000 square feet of office space with multiple conference rooms to get employees together on a Tuesday and then go back and work remote from home on Wednesday. It’s a great alternative.”

Developers said the time is ripe for establishing a foothold in the burgeoning Spruill Avenue corridor, which has been spurred by new developments including Firefly Distillery and Holy City Brewery.

“The city of North Charleston wants to redevelop the area after Firefly and Holy City Brewery came into that corridor, and I felt like an office park was the right play,” Marr said.

Marr is excited by plans for the future, including North Charleston taking possession of Spruill Avenue from the S.C. Department of Transportation.

“The city is going in and instituting a plan for Spruill Avenue, where it will be pedestrian-friendly, with a new median, new lighting and plenty of parking,” Marr said. “That’s in conjunction with the Hugh Leatherman terminal, which will have its own flyover off I-26, so trucks will be rerouted to not go up Spruill Avenue.”

Developers said North Charleston’s long-term vision includes a master plan for pedestrian trails and bicycle path from Riverfront Park by the Navy shipyard across Noisette Creek that will terminate on Spruill Avenue near the development.

“That whole area is being changed from industrial to a mixed-use area with residential, retail and now office space,” Marr said. “This is a long-term hold for us so that as we contribute and others contribute to this market, the area will only go up in value.”

Developers hope the office park will be able to compete with office markets in downtown Charleston and Daniel Island by offering a central Tri-county location with plenty of parking.

Garrett said future plans could set aside 2,000 square feet of space in the office park that could be retail or a food and beverage option.
“For us, it has to be the right retail that will be an amenity for the tenants,” Marr said. “There are three restaurants across the street, but we think a smaller dining option or some kind of amenity that can serve tenants of this project and the surrounding neighborhood would be perfect.”

Park Circle Gallery to exhibit works by Torreah “Cookie” Washington (SC) and Eunice Maku Ayiku-Nartey (Ghana)

The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to announce that a joint exhibition of art quilts by local artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington and Ghanaian artist Eunice Maku Aiyku-Nartey will be on display at Park Circle Gallery from September 1-30, 2021. A free reception will be held at the gallery on Friday, September 10, from 5:00-7:00pm. Cookie and Eunice will have a Zoom conversation about their works and artistic processes at 6pm. The public is invited to attend.Sisters Across the Sea...

The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to announce that a joint exhibition of art quilts by local artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington and Ghanaian artist Eunice Maku Aiyku-Nartey will be on display at Park Circle Gallery from September 1-30, 2021. A free reception will be held at the gallery on Friday, September 10, from 5:00-7:00pm. Cookie and Eunice will have a Zoom conversation about their works and artistic processes at 6pm. The public is invited to attend.

Sisters Across the Sea is an exhibition of fiber art celebrating the Motherline through dialogue between African American artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington and Ghanaian artist Eunice Maku Ayiku-Nartey. For the past 15 years Cookie has been curating the Annual African American Fiber Art Exhibition presented at North Charleston City Hall as a component of the North Charleston Arts Fest. This Park Circle Gallery exhibition was originally planned as a solo show of her work, but later became a collaborative effort when she extended an invitation to Eunice to debut her artworks in North Charleston. Introduced by a mutual friend, both artists create work that celebrates common themes of African history and heritage, celebrating community, and stories from their own lives.

Cookie and Eunice are creative kin sisters. Though they live on different continents, their artistic journeys are similar. Both women have been sewing since early childhood and are daughters of dress makers who encouraged them to obtain economic autonomy and joy through pursuit of their craft. Cookie launched her bridal design and soft accessories business, Phenomenal Women Designs, in 1991. Eunice established Eunimak Fashion in 1993. Each woman embeds their intricate textile works with spiritual, cultural, and historical transmissions.

Torreah “Cookie” Washington is an award-winning master art quilter and curator. A fourth-generation textile artist, she has been creating with textiles for more than a quarter of a century. Cookie was born in Rabat, Morocco, but has lived in the South Carolina Lowcountry for 30 years and has played an integral role in the local arts community. “I have a passionate urge to create art that is ‘way-showing,’” says Washington. “I seek to make art that challenges people, art that makes your spirit soar, makes you think and feel, or that agitates and annoys; art that challenges you to learn more about the subject and to find your own feelings about it.” Cookie’s wish is to keep the tradition of quilting brought to the Americas by enslaved Africans alive and, through her work, validate their culture by weaving stories of the African or African American experience into her quilts, just as her foremothers did almost four hundred years ago. Although she is working in a medium that is centuries old, she believes she and other art quilters are shifting the historical to accommodate their new application. “Art quilting, though an emerging fine art form, is a fairly small part of the art world. I am thrilled to be part of the sisterhood that is bringing this craft/art to the Lowcountry. I want the viewer to come away changed after having experienced my work. I am not at all interested in creating art that matches your furniture. I find that art quilting emits a spirit, a presence, an energy, a vitality unlike that of any other medium,” Cookie says. Learn more about Cookie and her work at cookiesewsquilts.com.

Eunice Maku Ayiku-Nartey, a Ghanaian dress designer and textile artist, has been passionate about sewing since childhood. Although she studied textile design and production at various institutions in the United Kingdom, her heart remained in Africa. After taking several entrepreneurship courses in Ghana, Eunice launched Eunimak Fashion at Adabraka, which has developed into an international brand through trade fairs and now makes custom made clothes for distinguished ladies and the American, Zimbabwean, and Canadian embassies. Eunice is also a member of the Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), which specializes in European and Afrocentric clothing, accessories, and soft furnishing in home décor. A commitment to sustainability is at the forefront of the fashion and fine art that Eunice creates. The natural world and Ghanaian culture are generative sources of inspiration for her textile art, which is often created using repurposed scrap fabrics. The vibrant colors in woven kente cloth from the Ashanti and Volta regions of Ghana, as well as the rhythmic traditional dances like Adowa and Agbadza, are recent muses appearing in her textile creations. In describing her artistic journey, Eunice shares “my art was created along my journey of life and my sincerest gratitude goes to my late mom and dad.” View Eunice’s work on Instagram at @eunimak_fashion.

Park Circle Gallery is located at 4820 Jenkins Avenue in North Charleston, in what was formerly known as the Olde Village Community Building. Admission is free and free street parking is available on Jenkins Avenue in front of the gallery, as well as on the adjacent streets and in parking lots close by. The gallery is open 10:00am-6:00pm Wednesday-Friday, and Noon-4:00pm on Saturday. Staff and all visitors must wear a face covering while they are in the gallery. Hand sanitizer will be provided upon entry. For more information about PCG, call 843-637-3565 or email culturalarts@northcharleston.org. For information on other Cultural Arts programs and artist opportunities, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website.

Liberty Hill celebrates 150 years, residents work to rebuild neighborhood

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — The founding families of Liberty Hill are working to revitalize their community.The North Charleston neighborhood spans 112 acres between North Charleston City Hall and Mixson Avenue.“When I saw the community in its heyday, after I came back, it broke my heart,” said Craig Mitchell, who grew up in Liberty Hill. “I know what it used to be and my goal is to get it back to that glory.”It’s a glory founded in 1871 by freed slaves. In May of 1871, Ismael Gran...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — The founding families of Liberty Hill are working to revitalize their community.

The North Charleston neighborhood spans 112 acres between North Charleston City Hall and Mixson Avenue.

“When I saw the community in its heyday, after I came back, it broke my heart,” said Craig Mitchell, who grew up in Liberty Hill. “I know what it used to be and my goal is to get it back to that glory.”

It’s a glory founded in 1871 by freed slaves. In May of 1871, Ismael Grant, Aaron Middleton and William and Plenty Lecque purchased Liberty Hill for $900.

Now, Mitchell says dilapidated homes and empty lots are far too common. Because of that, he’s taking matters into his own hands to improve the neighborhood.

“I mow lawns, I had to rescreen a porch, paint a house, anything I could do to breathe more life into the community again,” Mitchell said.

“My grandmother and grandfather owned a small business on Nisbett Avenue,” said Valerie Harper. Her family has lived in Liberty Hill since 1915.

She says far more expensive homes throughout Park Circle, which is adjacent to Liberty Hill, are a clear sign of gentrification. She fears that is spilling into Liberty Hill and pushing out long-term residents.

“You see investors coming and taking advantage of the situation and you know a lot of people feel hopeless,” Harper said. “Advancement is good. I think gentrification is when you take advantage of a group of people that’s disenfranchised and they’re at that poverty level.”

Harper says 400 Black families once called Liberty Hill home. She believes that has fallen to around 150.

One of the remaining Black residents is Benjamin Grant. His grandfather, Ishmael Grant, was one of Liberty Hill’s original founders.

I’ve always had a lot of pride about Liberty Hill,” Grant said. “Property in my family and extended family members, we still own from the original property.

"We need to try to preserve Liberty Hill," he added.

It’s a fight for revitalization ahead of the neighborhood’s 150th anniversary on September 15.

Until then, Mitchel will work to ensure Liberty Hill’s legacy ahead is as rich as its history.

“I believe in my soul once given an opportunity, Liberty Hill can thrive yet again,” he said.

A full list of events celebrating Liberty Hill's 150th anniversary can be found below.

Friday, September 17

Saturday, September 18

Sunday, September 19

Public Safety Program For Students + Tagging Recycling Bins

Happy Saturday, neighbors! Here's everything you need to know about what's happening today.First, today's weather:An a.m. t-storm, then showers. High: 77 Low: 67.Here are the top stories today in Charleston:Today's Charleston Daily is brought to you by Newrez, a leading nationwide mortgage lender. Newrez is committed to providing Patch readers and their loved ones with hassle-free mortgage services....

Happy Saturday, neighbors! Here's everything you need to know about what's happening today.

First, today's weather:

An a.m. t-storm, then showers. High: 77 Low: 67.

Here are the top stories today in Charleston:

Today's Charleston Daily is brought to you by Newrez, a leading nationwide mortgage lender. Newrez is committed to providing Patch readers and their loved ones with hassle-free mortgage services. Make a smart move for your future and refinance with Newrez today. Call 844-979-1707 to connect with a Newrez loan officer. Newrez, LLC (NMLS #3013)

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Nicole Fallon-Peek

About me: Nicole Fallon-Peek is a journalist and copywriter with a degree in Media, Culture and Communication from New York University. She has served as a freelance reporter, managing editor, copy editor, and editorial director for a variety of B2B news outlets. She currently co-owns and operates content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.

When it comes to dressing for the weather, we here at L.L.Bean know it’s always best to plan for the unexpected. As temperatures dip, it’s important to have clothing that will help you stay warm, dry and ready for anything. Fortunately for you, L.L.Bean is offering 10% off your purchase — online or in stores — from Oct. 8 to Oct. 11.

Choosing clothing for unpredictable weather is a breeze when you know the three key layers that will keep you warm from the inside out. First, start with moisture-wicking base layers for men, women or children. Then add midweight layers, such as sweatshirts or fleece ideal for the kids, him and her. And don’t forget the outer layers, which — depending on your location — may vary from lightweight jackets, such as the Men’s Mountain Classic Water-Resistant Jacket, to insulated gear, such as the Women’s Ultralight 850 Down Hooded Jacket. Keep the kids warm and toasty with jackets, such as the Kids Ultralight 650 Down Jacket.

At L.L.Bean, we’re all about making it easy to enjoy the outdoors, no matter the weather. So grab your layers and your friends, and feel great out there!

Save 10% On L.L.Bean Clothing And Gear To Keep You Comfortable In Any Weather!

Photo credit: L.L.Bean

CALENDAR: Musicians to be honored Sunday in Hanahan

By Chelsea Grinstead | The Lowcountry Hall of Fame will be back Oct. 17 for its sixth installment at Hanahan Amphitheater to honor those in the community who have taken part in shaping what the Charleston music scene is today.“We induct people anywhere from educators to DJs to professional musicians — we’ve even inducted a repair person,” said organizer and Ye Olde Music Shop owner Michael Davis. “It’s all over the place. It’s the whole of music.”This years inductees are:...

By Chelsea Grinstead | The Lowcountry Hall of Fame will be back Oct. 17 for its sixth installment at Hanahan Amphitheater to honor those in the community who have taken part in shaping what the Charleston music scene is today.

“We induct people anywhere from educators to DJs to professional musicians — we’ve even inducted a repair person,” said organizer and Ye Olde Music Shop owner Michael Davis. “It’s all over the place. It’s the whole of music.”

This years inductees are:

The event starts at 1 p.m. and will have three performances from The Malibus, East Coast Party Band and the Rev. Dr. Johnny Mac of ‘80s rock trio, The Jumper Cables. Guests are welcome to bring coolers. Barbecue will be served.

Also on the calendar:

October screams at the Terrace. Check out Horror weekends at the Terrace Theater on James Island: The theater will offer weekends featuring slasher, vampire, classic and comedy films. Coming double features: Coraline/Paranorman (Oct. 15-17); Blair Witch Project/Heredity (Oct. 22-24); and Texas Chainsaw Massacre/Halloween (Oct. 29-31).

Jazz at the College: 7:30 p.m., Oct. 11, Sottile Theatre, 44 George St., Charleston. The College of Charleston’s Faculty Jazz Ensemble will feature an evening concert of jazz standards, arrangements and originals performed by Robert Lewis (saxophones), David Heywood (flute), Tyler Ross (guitar), Gerald Gregory (piano), Ron Wiltrout (drums) and Frank Duvall (bass). Tickets are $20 for adults; $10 for CofC students and youth (18 and under); and free for CofC faculty/staff. Purchase tickets online or by calling (843) 953-4726.

The Future of Photojournalism: 6 p.m., Oct. 13, Sottile Theatre, College of Charleston, Charleston. Legendary S.C. photographer Cecil Williams will join scholars and his peers to discuss the evolution and challenges of his craft. More. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required via Eventbrite.

Maintenance of Way exhibit: Through Oct. 30, Redux Contemporary Art Center, 1056 King St., Charleston. Redux and Tiger Strikes Asteroid Greenwill are presenting this exhibition of work by Hannah Barnes and Gyun Hur. They = create work that considers place as a mental and physical construct built by layers of time, a collection of striations. Barnes and Gyun explore the idea of maintenance in their practices as a physical and emotional pursuit, connected both to one’s private self and a broader public society. Their work invites the viewer to share in the collective experience of being private selves in public spaces.

Reviving photos. Through Oct. 31, Charleston Museum, Meeting Street. The museum is exhibiting The Lowcountry in Living Color: Making Historical Photographs Come to Life as the latest offering in its Lowcountry Image Gallery. Colorizing black and white pictures allows viewers to see components that otherwise might be overlooked. Buy tickets.

Birds of Prey flight demonstrations: 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Thursdays and Saturdays, Center for Birds of Prey, 4719 Highway 17. Awendaw. The center has reopened its doors to visitors after closing due to the COvID-19 pandemic, inviting people to once again come and explore the world of raptors through an outdoor program and flight demonstration. Tickets: . $20/adult; $15/children age 3-17.

Bird-watching at Caw Caw. Every Wednesday and Saturday — particularly through the end of February — you can see a plethora of birds at Caw Caw Interpretive Center in Ravenel as they make their way through the Lowcountry. The two-hour regular walks, which start at 8:30 a.m., are through distinct habitats that allow participants to view and discuss a variety of birds, butterflies, and other organisms. Registration is not required. Participants are encouraged to bring their own binoculars. A paid chaperone is required for participants ages 15 and under. Max. 10 participants. Fee: $9; free for Gold Pass holders. Open to all ages. More: Caw Caw Interpretive Center.

Farmers markets

Closing in October

North Charleston Farmers Market: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., every Thursday, Felix Davis Community Circle in Park Circle. The market offers fresh, locally grown produce as well as arts-and-craft vendors, specialty foods and live music. More. Closes Oct. 28.

Moncks Corner Farmers Market: 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., every Thursday, Market Pavilion at the Regional Recreation Complex, 418 E. Main St., Moncks Corner. More. Closes Oct. 28.

Closing in November

Summerville Farmers Market: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday, First Citizens Bank parking lot near Town Hall, 200 S. Main Street, Summerville. More. Closes Nov. 20.

Charleston Farmers Market: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday, Marion Square, 329 Meeting St., Charleston. More. Tentative closing Nov. 27. Holiday market to open temporarily in December.

Closing in December

Holy City Farmers Market: 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., every Wednesday, Holy City Brewing, North Charleston. vendors rotate weekly to provide shoppers with a tiny but mighty shopping experience. vendors will be selling a range of products from specialty foods, home and body care to arts and crafts. More info. Closes Dec. 18 with holiday market.

Open year-round

West Ashley Farmers Market: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., every Wednesday, Ackerman Park, 55 Sycamore Avenue, Charleston. More.

Sunday Brunch Farmers Market: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., every Sunday, Charleston Pour House, 1977 Maybank Highway, James Island. While the market is discouraging people from spending too much time hanging out during the market, everyone is invited to shop their local vendors. More info.

Sea Island Farmers Market: 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., every Saturday. Charleston Collegiate Campus, 2024 Academy Rd., Johns Island. More.

Goose Creek Farmers Market: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday, 519 N. Goose Creek Blvd., Goose Creek. More.

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