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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Charleston, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - Charleston's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Charleston, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

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Mortgage Broker Charleston, SC
 Refinance Charleston, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Charleston, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage Charleston, SC

Home Financing in Charleston, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Charleston, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Charleston, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages Charleston, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Charleston, SC.

Refinancing in
Charleston, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Charleston, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages Charleston, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker Charleston, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Charleston, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Charleston may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company Charleston, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Charleston, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Charleston loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Charleston, SC

Restoring vision by recharging cells' batteries

In May, an interdisciplinary MUSC research team won an inaugural Blue Sky Award, which provided $100,000 in funding for its project to restore vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by recharging the eye cells’ batteries. The Blue Sky Award was created to encourage high-risk, high-reward research that has the potential to make a profound impact on patient care but is unlikely to attract traditional funding due to the difficulties of the projects.The team is led by ...

In May, an interdisciplinary MUSC research team won an inaugural Blue Sky Award, which provided $100,000 in funding for its project to restore vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by recharging the eye cells’ batteries. The Blue Sky Award was created to encourage high-risk, high-reward research that has the potential to make a profound impact on patient care but is unlikely to attract traditional funding due to the difficulties of the projects.

The team is led by Baerbel Rohrer, Ph.D., of the College of Medicine, and Andrew Jakymiw, Ph.D., of the College of Dental Medicine, and included their graduate students Kyrie Wilson and Charles Holjencin. Rohrer is the Endowed Chair of Gene and Pharmaceutical Treatment of Retinal Degenerative Disease. Jakymiw is an expert in developing cell-penetrating peptides for drug delivery.

Together, they intend to tackle a disease that affects more than 10 million Americans: AMD. The disease causes vision to worsen slowly and eventually leads to blindness. Current therapies are inadequate, as they can only lessen the symptoms and aim, at best, to postpone the loss of vision. Existing therapies also require patients to return again and again for treatment.

“We knew that if we could treat the disease at the root cause, and not just the symptoms, that would be a huge step forward in regenerative medicine." -- Kyrie Wilson

Team members weren’t satisfied with just slowing down the disease. They wanted to develop a curative therapy that could protect and even restore vision.

“We knew that if we could treat the disease at the root cause, and not just the symptoms, that would be a huge step forward in regenerative medicine,” said Wilson.

At its root, AMD is caused by an insufficient supply of energy to eye cells.

“Every single activity of a cell requires energy,” said Rohrer. “Once you lose that energy, you will lose proper function of the cells. That will eventually lead to disease and vision loss.”

“This new approach is like a quantum leap. If this were to work, it would just significantly change not just the trajectory of my lab but the trajectory of treatment for AMD." -- Baerbel Rohrer, Ph.D.

Mitochondria are the batteries that supply energy to cells, and they have their own DNA – mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA – to help them to do that. When their DNA becomes damaged, mitochondria cease to function properly and cannot provide cells with the energy they need.

Over time or because of stress, errors can be introduced into mtDNA as it copies itself. Rohrer likens the process to the game of “telephone.” In the game, a person whispers a word into the ear of another person. That person then whispers the word into the ear of the next person and so on down the line.

“Whatever ends up after five people is probably not the word that you picked to start with,” said Rohrer. “And it’s pretty much the same thing with copying mtDNA.”

Instead of trying to target and fix many copy errors, Rohrer and Wilson wondered whether a better approach would be to prevent the mistakes in the first place. They could do so by providing the mitochondria a new blueprint, or template, for copying their DNA, essentially “resetting” the word in the telephone game.

“You need a new template,” said Wilson. “You need to go back and have the perfect words again and know what you’re trying to say.”

"Essentially, we have a delivery mechanism that carries its own instructions for cell delivery." -- Charles Holjencin

Rohrer and Wilson realized that they would need a vehicle to deliver the template to the mitochondria. It would have to be able to dodge the body’s immune system and be accepted by the mitochondria. They reached out to Jakymiw, who had expertise with small nucleic acid-based drug delivery.

“We had actually never delivered anything that large to that point,” said Jakymiw. “I mean we’re talking about like 16 kilobases, which is a pretty big molecule.”

Although the two laboratories had had initial discussions, it was the announcement of the Blue Sky Award that solidified the collaboration and jump started the project.

“Some outcomes of the preliminary work that has evolved over the last few months suggest that we can potentially deliver this large amount of DNA and target it efficiently enough to restore vision for individuals affected by AMD,” continued Jakymiw.

"You can also design the small proteins so that they can recognize a particular ‘zip code’ and deliver the cargo to that particular site within the cell.” -- Andrew Jakymiw, Ph.D.

Jakymiw and Holjencin decorate the surface of the mtDNA with small proteins that carry instructions for the cells and mitochondria on how to take up this newly formed nanoparticle.

“Essentially, we have a delivery mechanism that carries its own instructions for cell delivery,” said Holjencin, who is creating the nanoparticles being used in the project.

“You can also design the small proteins so that they can recognize a particular ‘zip code’ and deliver the cargo to that particular site within the cell,” said Jakymiw.

These small proteins also provide a potential “invisibility cloak” to protect the nanoparticles from the body’s immune system.

To date, the team has shown that the small proteins can package the mtDNA within nanoparticles and deploy it to the struggling mitochondria. They have also shown that it persists there for at least four weeks. In previous studies, mtDNA disappeared after just 48 hours.

“We will eventually end up looking for the presence of mtDNA at probably eight weeks, maybe even out to 16 weeks,” said Wilson.

“And obviously what we would want for humans is that that this translates into many years as opposed to having to repeat these treatments on a regular basis,” said Rohrer.

The hope is that introducing the template would set off a series of events that could lead to restored vision. The mitochondria might share the template with its neighbors, which could, likewise, pass it on. As the quality of mtDNA improves in more and more mitochondria, they could again supply sufficient energy to eye cells, restoring vision.

“This new approach is like a quantum leap. If this were to work, it would just significantly change not just the trajectory of my lab but the trajectory of treatment for AMD,” said Rohrer.

The collaborative biorepository project between MUSC and SCSU is expanding with the hopes of reaching more medically underserved communities.

‘Flying blind’: Some COVID-19 monitoring not done in Charleston, other parts of SC

One way the state monitors community transmission of COVID-19 has not been done in Charleston and some other areas of South Carolina for more than two months.At least one scientist who tracks COVID-19 locally said they are ’flying blind” without widespread testing and wastewater surveillance to look for the virus and provide a key indicator of how much is circulating. The Charleston area may actually be in the midst of another surge based on modeling of what data is available, said Dr. Michael Sweat of Medical University o...

One way the state monitors community transmission of COVID-19 has not been done in Charleston and some other areas of South Carolina for more than two months.

At least one scientist who tracks COVID-19 locally said they are ’flying blind” without widespread testing and wastewater surveillance to look for the virus and provide a key indicator of how much is circulating. The Charleston area may actually be in the midst of another surge based on modeling of what data is available, said Dr. Michael Sweat of Medical University of South Carolina. A Clemson University scientist is urging caution as well.

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control said it is working to take over wastewater surveillance testing for the virus from a lab at the University of South Carolina, which has been reporting those results to the National Wastewater Surveillance System at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“It has been some time, I think, since USC submitted samples to the CDC for reporting out,” Dr. Linda Bell, the state epidemiologist, acknowledged.

A spokesman for USC did not return calls seeking comment.

Wastewater surveillance can pick up trends in virus levels shed in human waste from people who may not have symptoms yet four to six days before it is likely to be picked up by clinical testing, so it can provide an early warning of outbreaks, according to the CDC. It is meant as a complement to other surveillance, but CDC Director Rochelle Walensky praised the testing this year for providing an early signal of outbreaks beginning in the Northeast.

Wastewater treatment plants regularly pull samples for other testing, so it is a matter of taking part of that sample and shipping it off for testing. The labs carefully handle and filter the samples to get something that can be subjected to the same diagnostic testing as patients, said Dr. Delphine Dean, director of the Clemson Research and Education in Disease Diagnosis and Intervention (REDDI) Lab. Bell said it is a recent addition to surveillance but it has value.

“The concept, that wastewater surveillance can be a big benefit to early detection of transmission in a community that does not rely on somebody having to to go a healthcare facility to be tested, it does have really significant attributes in that way,” she said.

According to the CDC’s data, Charleston has not had its wastewater checked for COVID-19 since at least April 7. The same goes for Darlington and Lexington counties, while Richland, Horry, Georgetown and some other areas of the state have not been monitored since around mid-May.

In almost every case, the virus levels were rising when last checked. The only current data is coming from monitoring done at Clemson for Anderson, Greenville, Greenwood and Pickens counties. There, “it is kind of steadily increasing week to week,” Dean said. It is not the explosion of cases seen in some previous surges, with the delta and early omicron variants, but it is rising, she said.

That may also be true for the Charleston area, said Sweat, director of the MUSC COVID-19 Epidemiology Intelligence Project. In its monitoring of Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties, cases per day per 100,000 population increased 10 percent this past week, from 31 to 34, Sweat said.

Recent modeling by Johns Hopkins University and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation suggest that only about 10 percent of actual COVID-19 cases are being picked up by testing due in part to a large amount of home tests. Even using a conservative sixfold multiplier would put the actual cases in the community at 204 per 100,000, or about where cases were during the onslaught of the delta variant last fall, Sweat said.

“We’re in a surge, it’s pretty obvious,” he said. “I think there is a lot of transmission, and it is continuing to go up. Because of vaccination and prior infection, we’re not seeing the same numbers hospitalized and dying” due to better protection against severe disease. That is validated by internal numbers: MUSC closely tracks its own staff who come down with COVID-19 and those numbers are approaching what they were during the delta surge, Sweat said.

Wastewater surveillance would provide a better window into how much virus is actually circulating in the community, he said.

“Having wastewater would be really valuable; there is consensus in the field about that,” Sweat said. When the state stopped widespread testing in favor of home tests, “the value of the case reporting diminished because we were getting vast undercounts. That kind of left us in that flying-blind mode,” he said. Wastewater surveillance for the virus was supposed to help alleviate that, but the area is without it, Sweat said.

“We need it,” he said. “I think it would be valuable to see that.”

It is one reason DHEC is trying to do the testing itself. After meetings over the past week, the DHEC Public Health Laboratory is now working to validate its testing as it prepares to take over the wastewater surveillance, the agency said in a statement to the Post and Courier. That process may continue all summer, DHEC Media Relations Director Ron Aiken said.

But even without it, the state is reporting many other good metrics, such as cases per 100,000 population and hospitalizations, that allow people to know what is happening with COVID-19 in their communities, Bell said.

“We do encourage people to continue to look at the traditional surveillance systems,” Bell said.

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, in a White House COVID-19 briefing on June 9, also encouraged people to maintain vigilance. “We are not done with the pandemic,” he said. “The virus is still here.”

Clemson was monitoring virus levels in its wastewater on campus and also closely tracking how many people tested positive on campus so it could validate how valuable the wastewater data was in predicting infections, Dean said.

“It allowed us to build pretty good estimates on how the wastewater relates to total case counts,” she said. Its data allows Dean to estimate that 1-1.5 percent of the population is infected in the areas they monitor. It translates into an elevated level of risk, Dean said.

“That means if you are going to be in an indoor setting with a larger group of people, you’re pretty likely to have someone in there who has COVID, so you should take precautions,” she said.

Charleston Co. School Board meeting heats up over testing data

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A Charleston County School Board meeting turned contentious Monday night pitting board members and district staff against each other.The testy exchange over a disappointing presentation on academic achievement prompted board member Lauren Herterich to call for a brief recess.“I guess I am just sick and tired of seeing this kind of report, reporting in the disparity between the black, Hispanic, white and others,” Board Chair Eric Mack said. “We are not moving students like we should.&r...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A Charleston County School Board meeting turned contentious Monday night pitting board members and district staff against each other.

The testy exchange over a disappointing presentation on academic achievement prompted board member Lauren Herterich to call for a brief recess.

“I guess I am just sick and tired of seeing this kind of report, reporting in the disparity between the black, Hispanic, white and others,” Board Chair Eric Mack said. “We are not moving students like we should.”

Chief Academic Officer Karolyn Belcher presented the latest testing data that showed the Charleston County School District is performing better than similar-sized districts across the nation, but largely on the backs of white and Asian-American students.

Only 26 percent of Black and 36 percent of Hispanic students are meeting achievement goals in math, grades 2 through 8, compared to 77 percent of their white counterparts and 71 percent of Asian-American students, the data showed.

“I know that doesn’t feel good. I don’t think I have been trying to excuse our low achievement, but I am not sure what the strategy was prior to these two years to improve these schools. We have a strategy now,” Belcher said.

Belcher has been with the school district for two years and has been implementing the turnaround strategy in a district where the achievement gap between black and white students has always been a problem. However, the issue has not seen much improvement in that time.

It’s not just math. Data presented Monday night showed Black and Hispanic students are well below the national average this year at just 34 percent and 35 percent respectively. Those numbers are down from last year and the pre-pandemic levels. Meanwhile, white and Asian-American students are have improved or stayed steady from last year at 77 percent and 73 percent respectively.

“Your job and the staff’s is to find a way to improve the scores and put resources in places where they need to be,” Mack said.

“The achievement gaps have lasted for multiple decades but to assume that a turnaround effort which typically takes three to five years, in a pandemic year, is going to show achievement gains is simply unrealistic [in year two],” Belcher said. “Point to any other district across the country that has done that and I will happily follow their path.”

Board member Kristen French also took shots at Belcher’s presentation saying the data was confusing a difficult to understand.

“Even within this presentation, you used two different graphic systems. That’s completely confusing. It’s frustrating for me to say the least,” French said. “I also want to say, because you got pretty confrontational with Rev. Mack, that data slide does not show we are doing better for Black kids at all. Don’t tell us that we’re doing better. We are not.”

Visibly agitated, Belcher said she didn’t intend to be confrontational.

“I feel like I represent the teachers and the principals who are working very hard to improve student achievement in a very tough time,” Belcher said. “I am trying to represent people who I don’t want to lose heart out in the field, who are working very, very hard to move the needle in closing that gap.”

Belcher says there are promising signs in the data saying while Black and Hispanic students aren’t hitting the achievement mark, they are growing from their starting point. She says an increasing growth percentile means they expect the achievement numbers to finally show some progress next year.

Meanwhile, Board Member Helen Frazier commented on the district’s priorities by pointing out that the only picture in the test score presentation featured all white and Asian-American students.

“If you’re going to talk to me about the differences in test scores, then I need to see me represented on this paper,” Frazier said, holding up a copy of the presentation. “I don’t see the majority of the board represented here and I am insulted by it. I really, really am. Not only are we left behind in reading, we’re left behind when you present things to the board.”

The board broke into recess for about 10 minutes before finishing the meeting.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Spoleto Festival 2022 in Charleston, SC

We’re officially two days away from the kickoff of Spoleto Festival USA 2022. While this annual festival is often recognized as a staple of Charleston history + culture, Spoleto is also internationally acclaimed as America’s premier performing arts festival.Let’s dive into how Spoleto began and what the next 17 days will look like d...

We’re officially two days away from the kickoff of Spoleto Festival USA 2022. While this annual festival is often recognized as a staple of Charleston history + culture, Spoleto is also internationally acclaimed as America’s premier performing arts festival.

Let’s dive into how Spoleto began and what the next 17 days will look like during the event’s 46th season.

Founded in 1977 by Pulitzer Prize-winning Italian-American composer Gian Carlo Menotti + American conductor Christopher Keene, with the help of others, Spoleto Festival was established as an American sister festival, per se, to the Festival of Two Worlds founded by Menotti in 1958.

The Holy City’s charm + intimacy influenced Menotti’s choice — no surprise there.

With the help of Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr. + former CofC President Theodore Stern, the 17-day celebration held its first season in 1977. Since then, Spoleto has led the charge on renovations to local performance spaces, including Dock Street Theatre and the Charleston Gaillard Center.

The mission is to offer programs of high artistic caliber while remaining dedicated to young artists, performance opportunities, innovation, and performing arts — hence the all-encompassing nature of the events.

The poster for this year’s festival was revealed on Monday, showcasing the work of New York-based artist Christopher Myers. Featuring a work of stained glass, the poster is said to hold stories of the world, according to the artist. Check out the design.

So, what can we expect to see this year? Between this Friday and June 12, our city will be filled with opera, theater, dance, chamber, symphonic, choral, and jazz music productions, featuring both emerging and renowned artists.

Event venues vary — including Festival Hall and Sottile Theatre. Take a peek at the schedule and the performances for a rundown on each show. We’ve got our eyes on the Ballet Encore feat. New York City Ballet.

Feeling inclined to support the effort? Learn how.

Did you know? You can apply for a short-term internship opportunity with Spoleto. While this year’s applications are now closed, mark your calendars for the 2023 Apprenticeship Programdetails will become available in September.

South Carolina Ports announces end of Carnival Cruise contract

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Carnival Cruises will no longer depart and return to Union Pier Terminal in Charleston starting in 2024.On Wednesday, the SC Ports announced it will not be renewing the homeport cruising contract, and will instead focus on redevelopment of Union Pier. The ports do still plan to host ships as a port of call in the future.Jim Newsome, president and CEO of South Carolina Ports Authority, says this has been a conversation for a while.“As time has gone along, and certainly the real estate value...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Carnival Cruises will no longer depart and return to Union Pier Terminal in Charleston starting in 2024.

On Wednesday, the SC Ports announced it will not be renewing the homeport cruising contract, and will instead focus on redevelopment of Union Pier. The ports do still plan to host ships as a port of call in the future.

Jim Newsome, president and CEO of South Carolina Ports Authority, says this has been a conversation for a while.

“As time has gone along, and certainly the real estate values have increased in Charleston and just the opportunity to do something really transformational. The City of Charleston has led us to the conclusion to do a complete non-maritime redevelopment. And the consequence of that is we really don’t have a place to do a home port operation after the end of this contract in 2024,” Newsome says.

Newsome says they have engaged Low Enterprises, the firm building the Cooper Hotel on Concord Street, for the redevelopment.

“So they are running point on the planning, and that planning really entails deciding what steps and taking the steps needed to get this property to what’s known as a planned unit development phase,” Newsome says.

He says the timeline goal is to move with the development as fast as possible once the 2024 contract with Carnival is up.

“Basically where there’s a master plan that can be approved, and then developers can then buy the property and do what’s in their best interest on that property,” Newsome says.

He says there will be an engagement phase to see what they want coming to the area while they make a master plan.

Newsome says he thinks the idea will have a lot of benefits.

“It’s attractive to everyone in the sense that the city will benefit by getting property back on its tax rolls. And really realigning the whole city of Charleston with its historic waterfront, there’s no access to the waterfront today if you think about it,” he says.

But the decision will impact how certain tourists engage with the city.

Erik Koenig is the Front of House at Queology Restaurant on Market Street, right across from the Carnival Sunshine Port. He is worried how this might change the business.

“When the ship is in, the crew gets off, they eat, they come by the shop,” Koenig said. “The people that are waiting to get on the cruise, they shop, they walk through town for hours and they settle in until it’s time to get on the ship.”

He says they will be grateful for port of call tourists, but have concerns with how construction and development will change the area in the coming years.

“We appreciate anything we can get,” Koenig says. “But the port of origin is very important to us because this is where all the folks come to this corner, this area, the market and everything else which is a huge impact on us. So we’re a little bit concerned right now about this.”

The Coastal Conservation League released the following statement in support of the decision:

While we are optimistic about what appears to be a new direction for the future of the cruise industry in Charleston, we look forward to learning more about the implications of this decision. We support limited port of call business—especially smaller ships that will have a greater economic impact—as long as the SPA continues to abide by a previous agreement to limit cruise ships in Charleston to 103 visits or fewer each year. We also need more information about whether ships will be docked overnight.

Newsome says the terminal is a great asset to the city and this opens up a lot of opportunities for how people will interact with the area in the future.

“This decision came clearer and clearer over time and ultimately, it’s the best business decision for the port,” Newsome says.

Carnival Cruise Line issued a statement on the decision Wednesday morning.

“It is amazing to see the continued growth of Charleston’s tourism economy, and Carnival is proud to have been a part it of since 2010. While exciting for the future of Charleston, the redevelopment of Union Pier Terminal will, unfortunately, mean Carnival will no longer homeport a ship in Charleston beyond 2024. We will work with the Ports Authority to explore future opportunities in Charleston. In the meantime, it is business as usual and we look forward to seeing our guests aboard Carnival Sunshine through 2024.”

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