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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Cottageville, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - Cottageville's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Cottageville, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Mortgage Broker Cottageville, SC
 Refinance Cottageville, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Cottageville, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage Cottageville, SC

Home Financing in Cottageville, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Cottageville, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Cottageville, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages Cottageville, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Cottageville, SC.

Refinancing in
Cottageville, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Cottageville, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages Cottageville, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker Cottageville, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Cottageville, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Cottageville may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company Cottageville, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Cottageville, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Cottageville loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Cottageville, SC

Cottageville store plays host to History Channel’s ‘American Pickers’

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and...

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.

The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.

Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.

“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and, at the time, Frank Fritz, who travel to junkyards and antique stores all over the country to find valuables and collectibles to buy and resale.

The Hunt brothers were always fans of the show and Brad said he and their mother Dorothy would watch it together over the years. Dorothy passed away last January and after Bruce and Brad acquired the old business, Brad decided to reach out to the show.

Hunt’s general store was operational in Cottageville from about the 1930s to 1989. Grandsons of the original owner and founder were on the “American Pickers” show which airs this weekend. The bottom photo is a house next door to the store. (Photo Provided)

“We have a lot of old stuff that I’ve seen them buy and I thought they’d like to look through (it). We watched the show a lot (and) it kind of felt like (we) knew them before they got there. They were very personable. They were there to work; they were cordial,” Brad Hunt said.

Cottageville was one of two stops in West Virginia, and Brad said the episode will delve into his family’s history and grandfather’s legacy.

“A lot of them are excited about telling the backstory; that’s a lot of the show on top of them buying and reselling stuff,” Brad Hunt said.

Lawrence “L.O.’s” store was a catch-all place that sold milk, groceries, hardware, guns, appliances and clothing. It was also a butcher shop.

“Those were common back then. There were not Walmarts, and every little community had its own little store that had everything,” Brad Hunt said.

L.O. ran the store until his passing in the ’90s, except when he was serving in World War II, during which time his brothers worked in his place. L.O. was a postmaster in the Navy and Cottageville, and his store was also the local post office at the time.

“He was the judge, jury and executioner; he kind of ran the town. He was a community servant,” Brad Hunt said.

Going forward, Brad says he and Bruce want to use the space as a man cave where they can store tools, work on projects and spend time together.

“We’re going to use a lot of the old stuff for decoration,” he said.

Mark Whitley, director of Jackson County Economic Development, said he’s looking forward to watching the episode since he’s a huge fan of the show.

“I never try to miss an episode and when they come into a community, it opens up our eyes to different parts of the country that we normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to see,” Whitley said. “Any kind of exposure we can get from this is going to be very beneficial.”

Whitley said Jackson County has a rich history and he’s grateful for the Hunt brothers’ work to be featured on the show.

“Jackson County residents have so many interesting treasures, I think they could spend quite a few days here and not even scratch the surface for the things that would be of interest to the national population,” he said.

When “American Pickers” features a piece of Jackson County history, Brad Hunt hopes people across the nation will learn something about the community’s culture.

“I wish my mother was still alive to be able to see it and participate. It was a fun experience and we hope everybody enjoys getting a little history lesson of the little town of Cottageville and our grandfather,” he said.

The show airs 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8, on the History Channel.

Candice Black can be reached at cblack@newsandsentinel.com.

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Kayaking the Edisto River — South Carolina’s natural hidden treasure in the Lowcountry

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry....

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.

The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Wintering in South America, the prothonotary warbler can be found in spring and summer in the Carolinas where breeding pairs can be spotted in trees along the riverbank or deep in the swamp. Its song is a bright twee-twee-twee-twee and as it darts among the low branches above the black water of a swamp, it seems to almost demand a photo.

This spring morning, as I paddle a quiet stretch of the Edisto River, a warbler darts among the branches of a low willow hunting snails and insects. With its yellow colors flashing like a lightning bug in daytime, I am compelled to stop once again and fill the memory card on my camera with photos of tree branches in an obsession that seems to amuse the little bird. Finally, both of us are relieved as I obtain a photo or two and both of us depart satisfied from the encounter.

The subject of my photo lives with others of his kind along one of the most beautiful stretches of the Edisto River that you can ever see. The Edisto River is the longest river system contained entirely in South Carolina. Rising from Saluda and Edgefield counties, the Edisto corkscrews 250 miles along the Lowcountry to the sea and forms the “E” of the critical ACE Basin water system.

Artesian wells and crystal clear springs bubble from the limestone bedrock along the upper river and near the coast it becomes a rich, blackwater river where deep swamps open to salt marsh horizons. To spend time kayaking or boating along the Edisto is to experience a special paradise on earth.

This section of warbler-haunted Edisto described above runs approximately seven miles from Good Hope Landing to Sullivan’s Ferry near Cottageville. Good Hope Landing is a beautiful, easily accessible boat landing that allows you easy access to the river. Its 10-foot sandy bluff is crowned by a majestic live oak and the river here is wide and relatively straight.

As the current carries you along you can spot an abundance of wildlife. Egrets and herons wade in the shallows, songbirds (including prothonotary warblers) inhabit the trees and in the water, terrapin, gar and even the elusive alligator can be spotted. The river is filled with redbreast bream, catfish and bass — making this a popular as a destination for anglers.

A few miles downstream there is a narrow portion, where willows grow close and fallen trees can snag unwary boaters or those floating along in innertubes, a favorite summer pastime for hundreds of visitors every year. At four miles, you will pass Long Creek Landing, another serviceable launching location, and shortly after will pass beneath the highway bridge of U.S.-17A at the privately owned Jellico’s Landing.

Up to this point, the Edisto has been wild and scenic with few houses or other reminders of human habitation. From the bridge at Jellico’s, well-sited river houses and cottages line the river and form the community of Sullivan’s Landing. Dating from at least as far back as 1820, Sullivan’s was one of many such river crossings in the Lowcountry before bridges and modern highways took hold. The 1820 record of the South Carolina state legislature reveals that the toll for Sullivan’s Ferry was “for every two-horse carriage, 50 cents … horse and rider, 10 cents, and 5 cents for every foot passenger and head of horses, mules, cattle, sheep, goats and hogs …”

Recently, I kayaked from Good Hope to Sullivan’s Ferry with a group of friends and we found the old ferry site to be far quieter that it might have been in 1820. We enjoyed a beautiful spring day with the smooth Edisto reflecting the deep blue of a sky filled with lazy clouds. Recent rains had raised river levels and we enjoyed exploring side channels into coves of swampy flooded forest and hidden oxbow lakes.

After many hours leisurely exploring and encountering wildlife, we arrived at Sullivan’s Ferry for the journey home. We were all of the opinion that this section of the Edisto River was the most beautiful we had ever encountered — and I am certain that you will feel the same way. Should you chance to encounter a little yellow bird in a willow tree, I am certain he will share his opinion of the river, too.

Good Hope Landing and Sullivan’s Ferry Landing are both located near Cottageville and are only a little over an hour’s drive from the Beaufort area. To get there, take Interstate 95 or U.S.-17-A to Walterboro and stay on 17-A to Cottageville. In Cottageville, turn left onto Pierce Road. At 4 miles, turn right onto State Road S-15-35 to the dead end at Good Hope Landing. Sullivan’s Ferry is located at the end of Sullivan’s Ferry Road approximately 3 miles from Cottageville just off 17-A. Both landings are managed by the South Carolina DNR and are well-maintained. There are no facilities, so pack accordingly.

The river in this section is swift when the water is up but very easy to manage, despite a few areas of overhang and snags. Careful preparation and good company will ensure you have a safe, enjoyable day on the water.

For more information, visit the Edisto River Canoe and Kayak Trail site at https://ercktrail.org or obtain a detailed map at https://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/river/edisto-guide.html

Septic tank drama may shutter Cottageville restaurant

COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – A problem with a septic tank may force a small business in Colleton County to close its doors for good.David Stanfield and his wife opened Red Brick Pizza in Cottageville a few years ago. But they may have to close their business after South Carolina’s lead health agency, the Department of Health and Environmental Control, said their septic system is not fit for the job.“Almost two years ago we started, and almost immediately DHEC jumped on my back,” said Stanfield. “In ...

COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – A problem with a septic tank may force a small business in Colleton County to close its doors for good.

David Stanfield and his wife opened Red Brick Pizza in Cottageville a few years ago. But they may have to close their business after South Carolina’s lead health agency, the Department of Health and Environmental Control, said their septic system is not fit for the job.

“Almost two years ago we started, and almost immediately DHEC jumped on my back,” said Stanfield. “In March of last year, we started takeout only, but in March I contacted them about opening a 12-person dining room. They said yes, you can open it.”

A month later, Stanfield said he was told that could not have a dining room.

“I asked them about the tables out front – I had four picnic tables out front – they said you can have all the picnic tables you want, so we built a patio which has a bunch of outside tables. And then five months later, during another inspection, and we’ve gone through eight in one year, during another inspection they said you can’t have these outside tables. I said, well, you told us we could.”

DHEC told Stanfield that his septic tank was too small, and he was given a ‘shut door’ order.

“Two months ago, I went before the council- I begged them, I said my septic system has never overflowed, it’s never had a problem, and they said you have 60 days to put this monstrosity in back here.”

His customers were outside protesting on Tuesday while raising money to help keep them in business.

Stanfield began installing the large septic system. He says he has now spent $51,000 on the project. But his business only makes about $800-$1,000 on a good week. So, he believes he will now have to just shut down.

Stanfield eventually put a water meter on his property after a suggestion from a neighbor to see how much water was being used each day.

“Our water meter shows that we use 350 gallons per night, my existing system will do 450 gallons and they’ve got me putting in the system it will do 1,500 gallons per night which is just crazy. They’ve bankrupted me. They’ve taken every dime that we have, and we don’t even have money to open for food this week.”

DHEC sent News 2 a statement saying Stanfield was not in compliance with his DHEC permit when he moved from take-out only to restaurant seating.

“Mr. Stanfield did not dispute the grounds for suspension but requested the suspension be rescinded because he was diligently working on gaining compliance with DHEC regulations,” the statement said. “Failure to install the upgraded system would not lead to closure of the facility but would result in the return to the original food service operation as approved and permitted by DHEC.”

“I don’t understand this because, you know, America is known for if you put everything into – whatever your dream is – you can get it accomplished and they are burying us alive,” said Heike Stanfield, Co-Owner, Red Brick Pizza.

Stanfield said they were last open on Saturday. But unless a miracle happens, he believes they may not be able to re-open again.

The matter was discussed during a DHEC board meeting on May 5, 2022 with the restaurant’s owner in attendance – a motion was made about two hours and thirty-three minutes into the meeting, following an executive session. You can watch that hearing by clicking here.

Blue Collar grows in spite of Covid

It’s hard to believe that anything good could come from the pandemic, but for one couple, something good did come out of it - a thriving business.Florida natives April and Aaron Williamson moved to Summerville, SC after they married 16 years ago. Finding the town “drastically changing,” they moved to Cottageville near the Edisto River. The family visited it the same day they saw the ad and bought it just weeks later.Aaron is a SC Dual Licensed Optician, but has a background in financial services. He also worked in sales, se...

It’s hard to believe that anything good could come from the pandemic, but for one couple, something good did come out of it - a thriving business.Florida natives April and Aaron Williamson moved to Summerville, SC after they married 16 years ago. Finding the town “drastically changing,” they moved to Cottageville near the Edisto River. The family visited it the same day they saw the ad and bought it just weeks later.Aaron is a SC Dual Licensed Optician, but has a background in financial services. He also worked in sales, served as a regional sales trainer, recruiter and was eventually vice president of Branch Development. Now, he writes children’s books. April is vice president of marketing for Cornerstone Advisory Group in Summerville, but she has a background in web design, writing and business consultation. In their professional lives, they have worked for fortune 100 businesses with big problems to solve, as well as small, upstart family-owned businesses. Those experiences taught them the value of effective communication, solid branding and creativity.“After years of sharing our experience with our employers, we decided it was time to go directly to our customers with our talent, to make ourselves more accessible, more effective and to allow us to work together as a husband-and-wife team to grow our business,” said Aaron.Aaron and April decided to go into business for themselves and meet the needs of Colleton County businesses, as well as online business that need help to expand and have a better online presence.For new businesses, timing is everything.Ironically, the Williamsons found themselves opening the doors of Blue Collar Marketing, only to find the pandemic spreading out of control across the nation before they could even cut the ribbon. Worried that this might affect their business goals, the Williamsons pushed harder and focused on creating close relationships with customers and helping them develop new ways to generate revenue and become more competitive.Because so many employers and employees were working from home during the pandemic, the computer became a vital tool for everyone. Employers were eager to find other ways to do business rather than owning a storefront.This desire for finding alternative business plans drove many customers to Aaron and April who readily assisted them in finding new pathways to market themselves.Surprisingly, the Williamsons found themselves flooded with work, even during Covid.During the pandemic, Blue Collar Marketing has now added three remote designers and two writers who assist with larger projects.“Frankly, we aren’t interested in growing Blue Collar to the point where we can’t put eyes on everything that goes out the door,” Aaron said. “What we enjoy the most is meeting new business owners, learning their industry, and figuring out how to place them to be competitive. Helping owners either grow their businesses or bring them to life is the fun part,” he added.The Williamsons were eventually able to meet their next-door neighbors in Cottageville and found to their amazement that the property owners were needing assistance marketing their new project… an alpaca farm.Aaron and April worked with Herd it Here Farm on Sullivans Ferry Rd. in Cottageville to prepare for their grand opening. That project included creating a website, marketing materials and consultations. Then, they showed the owners how to take charge of the project and continue the marketing strategy themselves.“Once we learn your business and what makes you different, we plug you into our protocols and execute what we’ve designed. We also teach our customers as much as we can about what we do, so they can be more confident in marketing for themselves instead of being locked into a never-ending contract,” said Aaron.The Williamsons say they have a simple goal for Blue Collar Marketing. “We want to make the path to a solution as easy and affordable as possible and ensure that businesses move on with tools and confidence to keep going and growing. “We want to leave them more profitable and optimistic than when we met,” said Aaron.“I think a lot of people don’t know there is a specialty marketing company right here in their backyard. We want to help businesses grow while remaining a small, family owned, and local business right here in Colleton County.”

Other items that may interest you

Forested area near Good Hope Landing along Edisto River protected, transferred to SC DNR

COTTAGEVILLE — A tract of nearly 150 acres of hardwood trees along the Edisto River — home to guarded bird species like the wood stork — was recently transferred to the state for conservation and is now protected.The property, situated adjacent to the popular Good Hope Landing, provides a number of wetland benefits: floodwater storage, wildlife habitat and protection of drinking water quality.Several rare, threatened and endangered species — such as the red-cockaded woodpecker and southern bald eagle, th...

COTTAGEVILLE — A tract of nearly 150 acres of hardwood trees along the Edisto River — home to guarded bird species like the wood stork — was recently transferred to the state for conservation and is now protected.

The property, situated adjacent to the popular Good Hope Landing, provides a number of wetland benefits: floodwater storage, wildlife habitat and protection of drinking water quality.

Several rare, threatened and endangered species — such as the red-cockaded woodpecker and southern bald eagle, the Atlantic sturgeon fish and Carolina birds-in-a-nest flower — call the space home.

Additionally, about a third of all state priority fish species are found in the surrounding Edisto River system.

And since this tract is immediately downstream from the landing, it is either the first or last site users see when they’re getting on or off the river.

The big hardwood trees there, probably second growth after being logged decades ago, have a huge impact on the landing’s users and are aesthetically important to protect, said Patrick Moore, a senior project manager at Open Space Institute.

The institute this month announced the land transfer to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources. The property sits across from the 1,375-acre Edisto River Wildlife Management Area, which the state also oversees.

The addition of this land to the wildlife management area means creating a safeguard of public and recreational access and drinking water for downstream communities, said Nate Berry, OSI’s senior vice president in South Carolina.

A number of groups chipped in to make the move possible, including the Waste Management company, the S.C. Conservation Bank and the Coastal Conservation League.

When environmentalists heard the property was going to be sold and possibly logged, OSI stepped in and purchased it to keep that from happening, Moore said. Waste Management contributed funds for the effort, too, and DNR secured a grant from the conservation bank for the transfer.

“Acquisition of this property will protect another important parcel along the Edisto, one of the longest, free-flowing rivers in the United States that provides critical habitat for game and non-game species,” said DNR Director Robert Boyles.

The Edisto is the longest blackwater river in the country, meandering some 250 miles from Edgefield and Saluda counties to the Atlantic Ocean at Edisto Island, according to the state Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

Boyles said DNR is appreciative of partnering with the other organizations to provide more land where the public can enjoy outdoor activities. The river already has a 62-mile canoe and kayak trail that offers camping and picnic sites for single and multi-day trips, according to a news release.

With the addition of the property near Good Hope Landing, OSI has conserved more than 35,000 acres in South Carolina over the past five years.

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