With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in James Island, SC

Ask us Anything843-478-5612

Quick Quote

Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in James Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - James Island's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in James Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Mortgage Broker James Island, SC
 Refinance James Island, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in James Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage James Island, SC

Home Financing in James Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in James Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in James Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages James Island, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in James Island, SC.

Refinancing in
James Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in James Island, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages James Island, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker James Island, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in James Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in James Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company James Island, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in James Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why James Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in James Island, SC

U.S. Open 2022 tee times: Starting times and pairings for the first and second round at The Country Club

Come Thursday at the U.S. Open, the reality of golf’s new world order will play out at The Country Club. Eleven golfers who participated in the debut last week of the LIV Golf Invitational series—including former U.S. Open winner Dustin Johnson and six-time runner-up Phil Mickelson—will be competing at Brookline, the USGA deciding to let them play even as seven of them have been ...

Come Thursday at the U.S. Open, the reality of golf’s new world order will play out at The Country Club. Eleven golfers who participated in the debut last week of the LIV Golf Invitational series—including former U.S. Open winner Dustin Johnson and six-time runner-up Phil Mickelson—will be competing at Brookline, the USGA deciding to let them play even as seven of them have been suspended from competing on the PGA Tour. The potential for awkwardness is high.

In turn, the question many have is how will the USGA handle threesome pairings as the renegades return. Who will Mickelson play with as he makes his first appearance in a PGA Tour-sanctioned event since February? Will James Piot, the U.S. Amateur champion who has turned pro and played over in London last week, find himself in a traditional threesome with Jon Rahm and Collin Morikawa, the reigning U.S. Open and Open Championship winners? Or is something else in store?

Interestingly, the USGA often has made a habit of trying to get creative when it comes to early round tee times. Pairings of past winners of USGA events are frequent, but sometimes officials get even a little more esoteric. In 2013, before the ban on anchored putting, there was a pairing of three major winners who used long putters (Adam Scott, Keegan Bradley and Webb Simpson). Threesomes of long drivers seem to happen every year. College alums or international brethren find a way of being grouped together. And famously when the U.S. Open was previously held at Torrey Pines in 2008, the USGA went ahead and paired the No. 1, 2 and 3 players in the world—Tiger Woods, Mickelson and Adam Scott.

So what’s in store for this year at The Country Club? Tee times have yet to be announced, so we’re waiting to find out. Below is the field as of Sunday, the latest play in being David Lingmerth, who replaced Martin Kaymer when the 2014 U.S. Open winner withdrew on Saturday due to injury.

Players will be competing in threesomes off the first and 10th tees during the first and second rounds next Thursday and Friday. Check back here closer to the championship and we’ll have them posted as soon as they go live.

2: From the 2021 U.S. Open, the 10 lowest scorers and anyone tying for 10th place

5: Winners of the 2021 U.S. Junior Amateur & U.S. Mid-Amateur and the 2021 U.S. Amateur runner-up (must be an amateur)

8: Winners of The Open Championship the last five years (2017-21)

12: Multiple winners of PGA Tour events that award a full-point allocation (June 2021-June 2022)

13: Winner of the 2021 British Amateur (must be an amateur)

14: Winner of the 2021 Mark H. McCormack Medal (top-ranked in WAGR, must be an amateur)

16: From the four-event U.S. Open 2022 European Qualifying Series (Betfred British Masters, Soudal Open, Dutch Open and Porsche European Open), the top 10 aggregate point earners that are not otherwise exempt

17: From the 2020-21 Asian Tour Final Order of Merit, the top finisher who is not otherwise exempt as of May 23

18: From the 2021-22 ISPS HANDA PGA Tour of Australasia Final Order of Merit, the top finisher who is not otherwise exempt as of May 23

19: From the 2021-22 Sunshine Tour Order of Merit, the leading player who is not otherwise exempt as of May 23

20: Top-60 point leaders and ties from the current Official World Golf Ranking as of May 23, 2022

21: Top-60 point leaders and ties from the current Official World Golf Ranking as of June 6, 2022

Monte Lee’s firing at Clemson leaves Lowcountry baseball players in limbo

The firing of Monte Lee as Clemson’s head baseball coach last week sent shockwaves through the college baseball world. Among those directly affected are the current members of the program, but also future players that have already signed or verbally committed to the program.Two players from the Lowcountry are among those who pledged to play for Lee at Clemson. James Island catcher Hogan Garner, who just graduated from high school, already has signed his national letter-of-intent.Berkeley junior outfielder Jackson Proctor ...

The firing of Monte Lee as Clemson’s head baseball coach last week sent shockwaves through the college baseball world. Among those directly affected are the current members of the program, but also future players that have already signed or verbally committed to the program.

Two players from the Lowcountry are among those who pledged to play for Lee at Clemson. James Island catcher Hogan Garner, who just graduated from high school, already has signed his national letter-of-intent.

Berkeley junior outfielder Jackson Proctor committed to Lee and to Clemson as a freshman and has been patiently waiting for his college opportunity. Proctor helped lead Berkeley to the Class AAAAA state championship last week, hitting seven home runs with 33 RBI in 2022.

“I wasn’t happy about it (the firing),” Proctor said. “One of the main reasons I chose Clemson was coach Lee. I loved the way he coached and he was a player’s coach. The way he reacted with his team, he would lift with them, take batting practice with them. He was a guy I wanted to play for.”

While disappointed with Lee’s firing, Proctor understands that college athletics is a business. He remains committed to Clemson, having grown up a fan of the school’s athletic teams. Things, however, are on pause.

“I have no idea what will happen, if the new coach will even want me,” said Proctor, a Class AAAAA all-state selection this season. “A lot really depends on who the new coach is. I’m keeping an open mind. I am not making a quick decision. I will just wait and see what happens. I know Clemson is the place I want to be. Just be patient and see how it all plays out.”

Garner, like Proctor, committed to Lee and Clemson as a freshman. This past spring, he led James Island in hitting with a .443 average, belting seven home runs with 41 RBI. He also went 6-0 on the mound with one save. Garner is a Class AAAA all-state selection and was chosen to play in the SC select all-star game on June 1-2. He also was named the region 7-AAAA player of the year.

Numerous attempts to reach Garner since Lee’s firing were unsuccessful. He is expected to report to Clemson on June 25.

“The whole world changed:” James Island woman hosts two Ukrainian refugees

Anna thought the name “Kitty” for her cat was pretty creative. It wasn’t a word you heard often where she lived. In Kramatorsk, everyone spoke Ukrainian or Russian.Now, the only memory she has of Kitty is a Polaroid photo.When Russian troops invaded Ukraine in February the Polaroid was one of the few things Anna put in her one, hastily packed suitcase. Since then, the Polaroid has traveled with her to Poland, Latvia, Mexico, Texas, New York and finally South Carolina.In the months since the invasion, An...

Anna thought the name “Kitty” for her cat was pretty creative. It wasn’t a word you heard often where she lived. In Kramatorsk, everyone spoke Ukrainian or Russian.

Now, the only memory she has of Kitty is a Polaroid photo.

When Russian troops invaded Ukraine in February the Polaroid was one of the few things Anna put in her one, hastily packed suitcase. Since then, the Polaroid has traveled with her to Poland, Latvia, Mexico, Texas, New York and finally South Carolina.

In the months since the invasion, Anna and her husband Eric, have traveled some 9,500 miles seeking a new home. They have asked not to share their last names to preserve their safety.

“We decided to move very far,” Anna said. “I want to have a family, grow children and just be safe.”

She packed some winter clothes for the bitter Ukrainian and Polish temperatures they first encountered, her laptop and a couple of the children’s books she had illustrated back when she had a seemingly normal life. She had a job as a graphic designer and an apartment with Eric.

“We moved to Kramatorsk because it had better conditions for us and we decided to stay there. But the whole world changed. All our plans we built, our apartment,” Eric said. “We miss our home.”

At one point the couple was separated at the U.S.-Mexico border while seeking asylum. They read from bloggers that it was the best route to take to receive a special visa specifically for Ukrainians. Eric was sent back to Reynosa, Mexico, while Anna was allowed to stay across the border in McAllen, Texas. The couple, married for two years, weren’t sure when, or if, they would see each other again.

“We were very upset and I had no way back,” Eric said. “I had no connections, no service, nothing. I don’t speak Spanish. I had stress because I didn’t know what happened with Anna and I didn’t know what I needed to do now.”

Anna went to stay with a family friend in New York and met with an immigration attorney who told her she could add Eric, who is originally from Latvia, to her asylum application. When they got back in touch with each other, Eric came to meet her on a tourist visa.

Eric and Anna are two of an estimated 6.6 million people who have fled Ukraine since February, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency. As of April, there were an estimated 15,000 Ukrainian refugees in the United States, the Associated Press reports.

But entry through Mexico is no longer accepted except in “extreme circumstances,” the AP reports. Instead, the U.S. began a new program that requires people or organizations in the U.S. to sponsor Ukrainian refugees before they may enter. The goal is to accept 100,000 refugees into the U.S.

“A lot of Ukrainian people still stay in Mexico and don’t have any opportunity to come here because now it is different rules to come to America,” Eric said. “We’re lucky.”

Choosing Charleston

Some 800 miles away from Brooklyn, Julie Uhler was reading headlines about the war in Ukraine from her home on James Island when she came across a website called www.UkraineTakeShelter.com. Divorced, with her two adult daughters living on their own, Uhler felt compelled to offer up a room.

“I had a couple of friends that were like, ‘what are you doing,’” Uhler said. ”’And I’m like, ‘you know, I don’t know. But how can I not? I’m a mom.’”

Two FaceTime calls with Eric and Anna later and the pair were boarding a plane to Charleston. They knew nothing about the Lowcountry but Anna said she found common ground with Uhler who is also an artist.

The first day was awkward, Uhler admitted with a laugh. She had two strangers in her home, worlds away from the life they knew, still practicing their English.

But it didn’t take long for the trio to settle in. Eric and Anna call Uhler their “American mom.”

With no specific plan in place, Uhler started chipping away slowly at tasks that might be helpful while also trying not to overwhelm the couple. She posted on the neighborhood social media app NextDoor asking for clothing donations that were better suited for a South Carolina summer than a Ukraine winter. One neighbor donated a pair of bikes.

“Day by day. That’s how we’re living,” Uhler said.

Most days over the last two weeks at Uhler’s house, Anna and Eric have worked on Anna’s asylum application and caught up on news of the war with friends and family now scattered throughout Europe. Anna can only communicate with her father and stepfather through text message because they are in the Ukrainian military.

But the couple is forging ahead in Charleston getting more comfortable. Uhler has cooked meals, taken the couple to downtown Charleston, helped find Eric a barber shop and learned to use Google Translate. They also made their first trip to Folly Beach.

“Now we are thinking about being surfers,” Eric said.

The couple can’t find work until their visas are approved, so in the meantime Uhler set up a fundraiser and plans to host them for as long as they need. If given the opportunity, she said she’d do it again.

James Island woman founds housing nonprofit to help single moms going back to school

JAMES ISLAND — Rebekah Lambooy knows the financial burdens single mothers face living in the Charleston region where housing costs have risen dramatically in recent years.Lambooy, a single mom of three — two boys and a girl — struggled after her divorce in 2012 to make ends meet. At the time, she had been paying just under $1,000 in rent. She didn’t qualify for government assistance because her income was just below the federal threshold.Lambooy decided in 2012 to return to college and complete her bache...

JAMES ISLAND — Rebekah Lambooy knows the financial burdens single mothers face living in the Charleston region where housing costs have risen dramatically in recent years.

Lambooy, a single mom of three — two boys and a girl — struggled after her divorce in 2012 to make ends meet. At the time, she had been paying just under $1,000 in rent. She didn’t qualify for government assistance because her income was just below the federal threshold.

Lambooy decided in 2012 to return to college and complete her bachelor’s degree to advance her career. In 2016, she obtained her business degree from the College of Charleston, earning her a raise at her job as a paralegal.

But Lambooy also used her business knowledge to establish a nonprofit that seeks to help other single mothers in similar situations. The James Island resident formed HerIndependence, which provides affordable housing for single mothers obtaining post-secondary education.

Lambooy said she’s grateful to be able to help provide some financial relief for mothers making an effort to advance their education in order to provide for their families.

“I’ve been there, done that,” she said. “I want to help somebody with just a portion of assistance that I can do.”

Lambooy got interested in housing while in college, and the interest inspired her to get a real estate license after graduating. She had also been noticing the rising costs of rent that had taking shape over the years, and she saw affordable housing as a path that could help families in need.

HerIndependence now owns three houses. Two had been abandoned buildings before the nonprofit refurbished them. They house two families where single mothers are heading back to school.

A third home is currently being redone for a new family.

The organization said it has relied mostly on federal housing funds funneled through the city of North Charleston. But as construction costs rise, Lambooy fears it could impact her organization’s ability to provide housing. She eventually wants the group to expand and host multiple projects across the region.

Donations can be made online at herindependence.com.

“This isn’t a handout,” said board member Jennifer Abrusia. “This is a way to help people who want to help themselves.”

Abrusia and Lambooy are friends who initially bonded over shared experiences. Like Lambooy, Abrusia was a single mother who struggled at times financially. The two also share the fact that they each received strong support from relatives.

“We both have kind of walked this path a little bit,” Abrusia said.

Lambooy recalled the difficult journey of balancing classes, children and a full-time job.

She scheduled her college courses at 8 a.m. so she’d be home in time to take her children to school. She’d then go to work, and then pick them up from school in the afternoon. Her day wasn’t complete until she’d finished taking them to their sports and other extracurricular activities.

Lambooy, too, said she’s thankful for those who stepped in and gave her a helping hand.

“I have a lot of supportive friends and family,” she said.

SC closes on nuns’ James Island waterfront property for $23M with plans to make a park

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.The announcement was ...

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.

In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.

The announcement was a surprise at the time.

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, told The Post and Courier in an interview this week that lawmakers only noticed the property was for sale as the window to bid was rapidly closing, and that the state’s formal offer came after that period had ended.

The state’s offer was not the highest, but it was successful, Campsen said, in part because it came without conditions that a developer might attach — like not closing until building permits are awarded.

Property records indicate the sale closed at the end of July, and the final price was $23.25 million.

The opportunity to preserve the 23-acre waterfront parcel from development, complete with views of Fort Sumter and the rest of Charleston Harbor, was a rare one, Campsen said.

He said the sisters “felt like their legacy and their stewardship of that land would be best protected, best preserved for future generations if the state bought it.”

The property will be owned by the Department of Natural Resources, which runs the marine lab next door, and managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, which might one day rent out the convent building on the site.

Campsen said the 24 rooms would probably have to be expanded for future visitors.

Sam Queen, a spokeswoman for PRT, said that a public planning process for the site is expected to begin early next year.

“It definitely is a unique situation and one we’re excited about,” she said.

DNR, meanwhile, had already been doing some work near the site, cooperating with the sisters there to use oyster reefs to stabilize erosion on the waterfront, said Erin Weeks, an agency spokeswoman. Most of the parcel is forested, with a residence building and a chapel on site.

Campsen said he was excited for the planning process to incorporate the existing DNR land, and that the two parcels could be at least partially tied together into one park. It’s a historically significant area — the point at the end of Fort Johnson Road is where the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter.

In the meantime, nothing will change on the land any time soon. As a condition of the sale, the sisters are allowed to stay on the property through at least June 2022, with an option to extend to December 2022.

The nuns were looking to move as their members age and new women don’t join the ranks. Sister Mary Joseph Ritter confirmed that the congregation planned to relocate to the Bishop Gadsden retirement home, but the transition wouldn’t come until next year.

“We’re on the waiting list, just like everybody else,” she said.

The congregation didn’t have any further details on the move, she said, but would have more to say in the coming months about how they hope to preserve their legacy.

Twelve members remain among the Sisters of Charity, a congregation that has ministered in Charleston since 1829. Through its history, the group ran a school for free children of color in the 1840s, cared for both Union and Confederate wounded soldiers during the Civil War, and founded the hospital that would evolve into the Roper-St. Francis health care system.

The sisters moved to their current home on James Island in the 1950s.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.