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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Ridgeville, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - Ridgeville's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Ridgeville, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Mortgage Broker Ridgeville, SC
 Refinance Ridgeville, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Ridgeville, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage Ridgeville, SC

Home Financing in Ridgeville, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Ridgeville, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Ridgeville, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages Ridgeville, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Ridgeville, SC.

Refinancing in
Ridgeville, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Ridgeville, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages Ridgeville, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker Ridgeville, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Ridgeville, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Ridgeville may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company Ridgeville, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Ridgeville, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Ridgeville loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Ridgeville, SC

Job market bursting with openings but thirsty for workers

Grads wantedMany of the 7,000 local high school graduates this spring will enter a robust tri-county job market with low unemployment and busy companies begging to hire them.Hotels, restaurants, retail shops and grocery stores are plastered with “help wanted” signs mostly for minimum-wage jobs paying around $7.25 an hour.Those positions might not be appealing for some young job seekers, not yet ready for the skilled, better-paying positions popping up in the area’s burgeoning manufacturing sector with...

Grads wanted

Many of the 7,000 local high school graduates this spring will enter a robust tri-county job market with low unemployment and busy companies begging to hire them.

Hotels, restaurants, retail shops and grocery stores are plastered with “help wanted” signs mostly for minimum-wage jobs paying around $7.25 an hour.

Those positions might not be appealing for some young job seekers, not yet ready for the skilled, better-paying positions popping up in the area’s burgeoning manufacturing sector with plane and car makers leading smaller firms that supply them with parts.

Therefore, according to College of Charleston economist Frank Hafner, the recommendation for young, untrained workers skipping a four-year college or the military, is to seek training that could take less than a year for jobs paying twice the minimum wage. There are a variety of fields, where higher paying work can be trained for in relatively short order, he said.

Hafner also said teenagers should not dismiss entry-level jobs like bagging groceries. Entry-level positions, he explained, teach good work ethics and help clarify future job interests and direction. In the wake of the pandemic, he said, the workforce has also changed as Baby Boomers have either retired or dropped out, leaving openings with a quicker path to advancement for younger employees.

In addition to manufacturing, construction, computer science, transportation and logistics, medical services and hospitality are among the hot local jobs. But high school grads are not yet prepared for all of them because of education requirements, said Dr. Cathy Almquist, Trident Technical College’s vice president for education. Many of these jobs require a certificate or a two-year associate degree.

Welders, truck drivers and mechanists are mainstay, well-salaried jobs that are now getting more attention as big manufacturers are moving to the tri-county area, she said. “There has never been a collective realization of that or an emphasis on it,” she said.

“More people are now aware of those types of careers and people are now aware that manufacturing is not the mills of the 1950s.” These are no longer professions where you come home dirty, she added, citing the clean plant floors at companies such as Boeing, Volvo, Mercedes and Bosch.

Hafner dispelled the idea that the pandemic alone is the reason employers are having a tough time filling jobs in a tight labor market. The April unemployment rate was 2.4% in Charleston and North Charleston combined, according to the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce.

“We still have Covid, but people aren’t avoiding crowds,” he said. “The reasons some jobs go unfilled could be that it is not what graduates want or it does not pay enough.” The trend has been that companies are reluctant to hire unskilled young people, he added. Thus, the more training the better. He does not expect that equation to change anytime soon.

Before 18-year-old Hayden Shiell graduated in late May from Ashley Ridge High School, he was on a career path to become a diesel engine mechanic. During the school week, in addition to his regular academic classes at Ashley Ridge, Shiell also attended a technology classroom at the Dorchester County Career and Technology Center in Ridgeville to study diesel engines. Initially, Shiell wanted to be an electrician, but his buddies were in the diesel class. He switched to the diesel class to hang out with them, he said, then discovered he simply liked diesel engines. Next spring, he plans to enroll in Lincoln College of Technology in Nashville,

Tenn., to enter a 16-month program to earn a diesel engine technician degree.

Some students wait until the last minute to make career decisions, losing valuable time to prepare for that first important job interview beyond a part-time summer gig, said Rania Thompson, career specialist at Woodland High School in Dorchester County School District Four.

“The ones that are accepted to college are ready for the next chapter in their lives,” she said. “Some are going to the military. But we also have some who don’t know what they want to do. They’ve let that senior year creep up on them. The pandemic made a lot of people lazy, unfortunately. We had to sit out for a year, secluded. Now that we can do [things again] we are stuck on not doing anything.”

Employers are calling with jobs that outpace the number of students willing to apply. For those who do apply, she added, they’re often hired at job fairs at the Woodland High School in the Town of Dorchester in Dorchester County.

For several generations society has emphasized a college degree as a means to success, said Chadwick Lindsey Vail, work-based learning partnerships coordinator for the Charleston County School District. Now, he said, a four-year degree can be associated with debt. “While college is right for some students, many could be better served with focused career training,” he said. “The paradigm has shifted to specialized training.”

Vail recommends Trident as a site for short-term training courses to prepare for high-demand skilled positions with companies waiting to fill them. Some of these opportunities also come with the possibility of advancement and even a company-paid undergraduate degree.

Ben Harmon, a technician with Charleston Air Company, saw that trend toward skilled positions shifting in 2017 as he was about to leave the U.S. Air Force in Charleston. While still in the military, Harmon enrolled in a HVAC certificate program at Trident. He wanted to ensure he had a transferable skill to a civilian job. Even before he completed the program last year, Charleston Air had made him a job offer.

When it comes to its degrees and focus each year, Trident uses a two-pronged approach to determine which degree and certificate programs to cut or create, Almquist said. The college uses the Charleston Area Chamber of Commerce’s talent demand study and it convenes academic advisory committees of industry leaders twice a year.

“Our No. 1 factor for developing a new program is what the employers in our area are telling us so we can respond quickly to industry demands,” she said. “Every one of our technical disciplines has an advisory committee composed of individuals from that industry.” At Trident, 500 people serve on 40 academic advisory committees.

Willis Cantey, president of Cantey Tech Consulting in North Charleston, serves on one of these. The college, he said, “has been very responsive and has done a spectacular job of trying to adapt to what we are looking for, but there are just not enough graduates to fill the local job market.”

The Charleston County School District has extended its job-training pipeline to the middle school years to expose even younger students to careers, Vail said. Eighth graders are given a career assessment to determine their interests and gifts: “so we can align them with a program of study at one of the district’s three career centers in East Cooper, West Ashley and North Charleston,” Vail said.

Each year students, their parents and their counselors meet to “help students connect with career opportunities and to confirm or eliminate their interests,” Vail said. The district also has an online career exploration toolkit for students and their parents to become prepared for college or a career after high school (charlestonempowered.com).

In Dorchester County, Thompson touts the Department of Employment and Workforce’s Be Pro and Be Proud SC (beprobeproudsc.org). The program features a mobile workshop that arrives at job fairs to show students a variety of skilled careers. Their 53-foot, double expandable 18-wheel custom built trailer has eight simulators for truck diving, forklifts, carpentry and welding to show students that trades are just as respectable as an undergraduate degree.

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Gov. Henry McMaster visits Ridgeville to recognize Dorchester Heritage Center

RIDGEVILLE — Gov. Henry McMaster made a quick trip to Dorchester County to recognize one of its growing historical centers.On the 81-acre piece of property in Ridgeville that will house their future location, the Dorchester Heritage Center team received its Preservation Service Award.The honor is awarded by Preservation South Carolina, a nonprofit dedicated to maintaining the historic architectural heritage in the state. The award is given to entities that make “make exemplary contributions to the advancement of his...

RIDGEVILLE — Gov. Henry McMaster made a quick trip to Dorchester County to recognize one of its growing historical centers.

On the 81-acre piece of property in Ridgeville that will house their future location, the Dorchester Heritage Center team received its Preservation Service Award.

The honor is awarded by Preservation South Carolina, a nonprofit dedicated to maintaining the historic architectural heritage in the state. The award is given to entities that make “make exemplary contributions to the advancement of historic preservation.”

The Dorchester Heritage Center is one of four entities that received the honor in January in recognition of its work preserving the history of Dorchester County, from prehistoric times to the last century.

Since no one from the center could make it to Columbia to receive the award in January, McMaster traveled to Ridgeville on Nov. 2 to hand deliver it to the team.

“We have to preserve and protect this state,” McMaster said. “This is a big deal.”

The center was nominated by Brockington and Associates, a cultural resource management group located in Mount Pleasant.

During his presentation, McMaster emphasized the importance of the work the Dorchester Heritage Center does and the value of teaching children their history.

Currently located in the old courthouse space in St. George, the Dorchester Heritage Center was developed in 2017 with the help of volunteers and board members. It was put together in 10 months after organizers learned that the center would host a Smithsonian exhibit.

Since then, it has grown to an expansive museum with exhibits that detail the history of the county. Museum items range from prehistoric fossils and historic items from the Edisto Natchez-Kusso Tribe to Middleton Place artifacts and items from the abandoned Clayton’s Grocery.

But recently the center has outgrown its current space and is working on building a new larger location in Ridgeville.

Off U.S. Highway 78, a couple miles from the planned Walmart Distribution Center, the heritage center is building a larger space. It will have more space for an exhibit hall and archival space and research center, as well as an indoor event space and outdoor event garden.

Organizers said they expect it to also be able to host weddings and even family reunions. The new property also includes a cemetery with headstones that date as far back as the 1800s.

Center organizers believe the property is the location of an old tavern. While inspecting the property, the center discovered Native American pottery from around 2,000 years ago.

The property also has wetlands organizers are envisioning installing a nature trail around. All of these things made it seem like the perfect space, organizers said.

They also said they have a lot of fundraising to do to see the space completed. So they’re looking at the community for support in raising more than $9 million to build the new center.

“We’ve got a lot of stuff to investigate here,” said Phyllis Hughes, the center’s president and board chair.

Those who want to support the center can visit the website at dhc-sc.com. They can also email LaClaire Mizell, the center’s director, at contact-us@dhc-sc.com if they have any questions.

“It’s just going to be a really good thing for the county,” Mizell said.

The Nov. 2 award ceremony took place under a tent at the new property. Ridgeville Mayor Clarence Hughes, who was also in attendance, said he was happy to hear the center was taking so much care in preserving the nearby cemetery.

Though the new center won’t fall inside the Ridgeville city limits, it will be located only a few miles from the downtown area.

“It’s educational,” Hughes said. “It’s great for the community.”

Over the next couple of years, the Ridgeville area is expected to see a lot of growth with new housing developments and the Walmart Distribution Center.

“Y’all are getting ready to have a lot of changes happen in the next 10 years,” said Michael Bedenbaugh, the president of Preservation South Carolina.

Phyllis Hughes and fellow board member David Dement said it was good to get McMaster and all of the other county and state representatives out to physically see the space.

Dorchester County Council members and local senators and representatives were also in attendance.

“I hope it’s been eye-opening,” Dement said. “We still have some work to do.”

Auto sector changed SC’s economic landscape 30 years ago

When Harry Lightsey took the stage at the S.C. Automotive Summit in early March, the South Carolina Secretary of Commerce understood the room.Before being named the top economic developer for South Carolina, Lightsey worked for years in the automotive sector, directing General Motors Corp.’s federal affairs operations in Washington...

When Harry Lightsey took the stage at the S.C. Automotive Summit in early March, the South Carolina Secretary of Commerce understood the room.

Before being named the top economic developer for South Carolina, Lightsey worked for years in the automotive sector, directing General Motors Corp.’s federal affairs operations in Washington. He also served as the leader for the company’s emerging technologies division, which included OnStar, a satellite-powered network that connects GM vehicles across the globe to services.

“We are truly an auto state,” Lightsey said.

The state’s auto sector represents $27 billion in investment since the first BMW rolled off the assembly line in Spartanburg County in 1994. Now, more than 72,000 South Carolinians are employed in connection with the automotive industry.

“Today in the South and Southeast, we are far and away probably the leading sector of this region of the United States in terms of automobile production,” Lightsey said.

The S.C. Department of Commerce’s 2021 International Trade Report (.pdf), released in February, reported that the state has 36.6% of the country’s market share of exported tires and 19.4% of its market share of exported passenger vehicles.

While the state’s total exports dropped 2% from 2020 to 2021 to $30.3 billion, the state still led the nation in exports of tires and completed passenger motor vehicles, a statistic Lightsey said he was very proud of.

In the Upstate, BMW produces 1,500 vehicles a day and has invested more than $11.9 billion in its South Carolina operations. At Volvo Cars’ Ridgeville plant, Plant Manager David Stenström said the company is working toward a production goal of 150,000 cars a year. In Ladson, Mercedes-Benz Vans’ operations assembles Sprinter Vans for the U.S. and Canadian market and reassembles Mercedes-Benz Metris vans. The company has invested more than $500 million in the Ladson Sprinter plant and assembled more than 260,000 Sprinter and Metris vans since opening in 2018.

Individually in 2021, BMW Manufacturing topped the list of highest export value for all U.S. auto manufacturers for the eighth year in a row, according to data from the U.S. Commerce Department. Last year, the plant exported 257,876 vehicles with a total export value of $10.1 billion to 120 countries — primarily through the Port of Charleston and by rail to Canada.

“I don’t think any of us could really forecast where we would be 30 years later,” Lightsey said. “Because if you think about it at the time, the vision and the boldness of that move by the leaders of our state and the leaders of BMW to make that decision to put the BMW plant in Greer, S.C. That opened up, not just for South Carolina but for the entire Southeast, the entire movement of the global auto industry into the Southern states.”

In 2021, South Carolina announced more than $15 billion worth of capital investment. The auto sector was the lead contributor with the top three investments.

Oshkosh Defense announced a $155 million investment in June to produce the next-generation U.S. Postal delivery trucks. The company expects to add 1,000 jobs. Volvo said the company would invest $118 million into Ridgeville operations to create the electric Polestar 3. At the Automotive Summit, BMW revealed that another expansion was underway in Spartanburg County. The company is adding a $200 million automotive stamping operation that will add 200 jobs.

Lightsey said the amount of investment being made in South Carolina is unprecedented when considering how the conversion to electric vehicles closely relates to the automobile and energy sectors.

As the world pivots toward electric vehicles, Lightsey said South Carolina has an opportunity to become the future leader in this sector. He also hopes manufacturers and suppliers will look to the Department of Commerce as a partner.

“We want you to understand that whatever resources we have in the Department of Commerce, whatever we can develop in terms of providing you the type of resources you need to be successful in the future, we definitely want to do that,” Lightsey said.

After all, once a business decides to relocate or establish operations in South Carolina, to hire workers and invest capital, they tend to stay, thrive and grow, Lightsey said. He pointed to BMW’s selection of Spartanburg County in the early 1990s as an example.

“If you think about that vision of 1992, if you think about where we are today, we are at the very, very beginning, the very precipice of unprecedented change in the automobile industry,” Lightsey said. “The conversion that we are just now starting to see from the internal combustion engine to the battery electric vehicle is something that hasn’t happened in over 100 years.”

Reach Teri Errico Griffis at 843-849-3144.

Working Wednesdays: New Walmart Import Distribution Center hiring to fill 1300-1500 jobs

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The brand new Walmart Import Distribution Center will open soon in Ridgeville and you can learn more about employment opportunities at the massive facility on Working Wednesdays.The center is bringing more than 1000 local jobs to the area.“We’re probably gonna be more so looking into 1300-1500 jobs that we’ll be hiring to be able to support this facility and all the volume we’ll be pushing out of it, General Manager Jeff Holzbauer said.Imported goods will arrive through t...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The brand new Walmart Import Distribution Center will open soon in Ridgeville and you can learn more about employment opportunities at the massive facility on Working Wednesdays.

The center is bringing more than 1000 local jobs to the area.

“We’re probably gonna be more so looking into 1300-1500 jobs that we’ll be hiring to be able to support this facility and all the volume we’ll be pushing out of it, General Manager Jeff Holzbauer said.

Imported goods will arrive through the South Carolina port, and will be stored and sorted at the Walmart Import Distribution Center for delivery to approximately 850 Walmart and Sam’s Clubs throughout South Carolina and other states in the southeast.

“So we will actually start receiving product Feb. 1 of next year, and start shipping product out April 5,” Holzbauer said.

The main focus now is filling positions for freight handlers. The job pays $18 - $19.35 per hour, depending on the shift. Click here to apply.

“The week of Oct. 11 we will start going after a large number of associates to be able to help us with that receiving of the product.”

Other positions include hourly leads, maintenance technicians, order fillers, unloader/processors, and environmental health and safety associates.

The 3-million-square-foot facility is the equivalent of 52 football fields. Dorchester County Economic Development officials say construction should wrap up by the end of the year. The first shipment of goods should arrive at the center by early February, and distribution is expected to start by early April.

Working Wednesdays is a weekly segment that focuses on employment opportunities. You will learn about companies around the Lowcountry, and the current and future positions they have available. The interview will live stream at 1p.m. on Live 5 Facebook, Live5News.com and Apple, Amazon Fire and Roku tv.

Ann McGill will talk with representatives from the companies to get in depth information about the types of services and products they provide, as well as training, benefits and other information to help you decide if it’s a company you might want to work for.

Once the livestream is finished, it will be shared right here at Live5News.com and on Live 5 Facebook.

If your business would like to share job information through this format, send an email to amcgill@live5news.com and be sure to put ‘Working Wednesdays’ in the subject line.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Walmart Announces Grand Opening of South Carolina Import Distribution Center; Mike Gray, Andrew Dale, and Jeff Holzbauer Share

Sponsored Message Learn MoreRIDGEVILLE, SC - Bolstering its import network, Walmart recently held a grand opening event for its new import distribution center. Located in South Carolina, the 3 million-square-foot facility will leverage the deep-water Port of Charleston to provide convenient cargo access.“We know our customers count on us for a broad assortment, and this new import distribution cente...

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Learn More

RIDGEVILLE, SC - Bolstering its import network, Walmart recently held a grand opening event for its new import distribution center. Located in South Carolina, the 3 million-square-foot facility will leverage the deep-water Port of Charleston to provide convenient cargo access.

“We know our customers count on us for a broad assortment, and this new import distribution center will give us expanded access to seaports, in turn allowing us to deliver a wide selection of merchandise from around the globe,” said Mike Gray, Senior Vice President, Supply Chain Operations. “We also strive to be a store of the community and are proud of how we’ve been able to leverage our investments in the supply chain to create economic opportunity and jobs for the Dorchester County area.”

Walmart selected South Carolina for the facility due to its business-friendly environment and decided on Dorchester County for its proximity to the Port of Charleston, a press release explained.

This new import distribution center will store and sort imported products that arrive through the port for later delivery to 850 regional Walmart and Sam’ Club locations in the Southeast. As soon as the facility is fully operational, it is expected to increase local port volumes by almost 5 percent.

“Our team of more than 980 associates from Dorchester County and the surrounding communities are excited to officially open the doors to our new Import Distribution Center,” said Jeff Holzbauer, General Manager, Import Distribution Center #8980, at the grand opening event. “South Carolina is home to some of the country’s most convenient and efficient modes of transportation, including the Port of Charleston and Interstates 26 and 95. Being a member of this community means having the advantage of the region’s existing infrastructure as well as a pool of experienced associates familiar with it. Cutting this ribbon today signifies our commitment to that community.”

The retailer’s initial hiring goal for the distribution center was 1,000 associates, meaning that Walmart is well on its way to achieving those numbers. Working with the Department of Commerce, Walmart expects to employ over 1,300 local full-time associates at this new operation.

“We are actively staffing Ridgeville with a team that will play an important role in serving our customers,” said Andrew Dale, Senior Director of U.S. Supply Chain People. “Walmart is dedicated to the training and development of its associates. Each of the positions we’re currently hiring for in Ridgeville brings with it a pathway of lifelong career opportunity that, with Walmart’s scale, has industry-changing impact. Walmart is full of everyday people doing extraordinary things.”

To read more about Walmart’s latest facility, click here.

What other benefits will this new distribution center provide for the retailer? Only time and AndNowUKnow will tell, so keep reading.

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