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Mortgage Broker in Seabrook Island, SC

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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Seabrook Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - Seabrook Island's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Seabrook Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Mortgage Broker Seabrook Island, SC
 Refinance Seabrook Island, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Seabrook Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage Seabrook Island, SC

Home Financing in Seabrook Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Seabrook Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Seabrook Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages Seabrook Island, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Seabrook Island, SC.

Refinancing in
Seabrook Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Seabrook Island, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages Seabrook Island, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker Seabrook Island, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Seabrook Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Seabrook Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company Seabrook Island, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Seabrook Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Seabrook Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Fox Chapel Sports Hall of Fame inducts Class of 2022

The Fox Chapel Area Schools Sports Hall of Fame has seven new members.The organization’s 25th induction banquet was held recently at the Harmar House where honorees ranged from a three-year starting football lineman at Penn State to a hometown District Justice.Miles Dieffenbach was a four-year starter for Fox Chapel’s football team and was named all-state in 2008 and ’09.He was rated the nation’s top center by ESPN and played in the Under Armour All-American game in Orlando, Fla.Dieffenbach...

The Fox Chapel Area Schools Sports Hall of Fame has seven new members.

The organization’s 25th induction banquet was held recently at the Harmar House where honorees ranged from a three-year starting football lineman at Penn State to a hometown District Justice.

Miles Dieffenbach was a four-year starter for Fox Chapel’s football team and was named all-state in 2008 and ’09.

He was rated the nation’s top center by ESPN and played in the Under Armour All-American game in Orlando, Fla.

Dieffenbach went on to Penn State where he lettered three times and started 27 games for the Nittany Lions.

He was named a Big Ten Conference Academic All-American from 2012-14.

Dieffenbach is now an investment manager for Carnegie Mellon.

Amanda Zambrano Daquelente excelled in soccer at Fox Chapel and at Franklin & Marshall College.

She scored 74 career goals while with the Foxes and was named all-WPIAL and all-state for the 2001 season.

At Franklin & Marshall, she tallied 40 career goals and was named four times to Centennial Conference academic honors. Zambrano Daquelente is now a partner in the Pittsburgh law firm of Meyer, Unkovic and Scott LLP.

Patrick Frank earned eight varsity letters in three sports — two in cross country, two in baseball and four in wrestling. He was a 1998 Valley News Dispatch all-star in wrestling and has officiated in the highest levels of the high school and collegiate wrestling ranks, including three NCAA Division I individual championships and three PIAA championships.

Frank also officiates high school football and baseball.

Jeff Armor lettered in soccer three times and earned all-WPIAL honors in 1981 and ’82. He went on to Lehigh University where he earned four soccer letters and captained the 1985 squad, scoring 12 goals and 14 assists while playing sweeper and defense.

Armor came back to Fox Chapel where he was an assistant to Erik Ingram from 2008-16. The Foxes made the WPIAL playoffs each of those seasons. He currently resides in Seabrook Island, S.C.

Reed Clarke came to Fox Chapel as an educator in 1966 and coached cross country for seven years, boys golf for nine years and girls golf for nine years.

He was, perhaps, most recognized as the scorekeeper at Fox Chapel basketball games from 1989-2017.

Clarke was a PIAA swimming official for 30 years and served on the board of directors for the Pittsburgh Youth Golf Foundation from 2006-12 and is a Tri-State PGA Golf Hall of Fame member.

Nadia Luttner is one of the most successful golfers in Fox Chapel history.

She was a four-year starter for the Foxes. As a freshman, Luttner helped the team to an undefeated season and was second in both the WPIAL and PIAA championships.

As a sophomore, she finished third in the state tourney, and the Foxes finished as WPIAL runner-up. In her junior season, both Luttner and the team were WPIAL runners-up.

She capped her high school career with a WPIAL team title and an individual silver medal.

She competed in college at Kansas and at Coastal Carolina.

Matthew Rudzki was an outstanding distance runner for the Foxes as a four-time letter winner in cross country, a three-time state qualifier and a two-time WPIAL medalist.

In track, he lettered three times, was a WPIAL medalist in the 3,200-meter run and was part of the team that set a school record in the distance medley relay.

At Washington & Jefferson College, he was a two-time Presidents’ Athletic Conference cross country individual champion, the first in school history.

Since then, he has traded his running shoes for a judicial robe, serving now as the magisterial district judge for the Fox Chapel area communities.

Tags: Fox Chapel

Letters: Make good memories at summer camp

Lowcountry children will soon be heading to summer camp.My three children attended Camp St. Christopher on Seabrook Island, happily dragging steamer trunks behind them.They slept in bunks, lulled to sleep by wind and waves.They went kayaking. They went sailing. They leaped into the pluff mud pit with wild abandon....

Lowcountry children will soon be heading to summer camp.

My three children attended Camp St. Christopher on Seabrook Island, happily dragging steamer trunks behind them.

They slept in bunks, lulled to sleep by wind and waves.

They went kayaking. They went sailing. They leaped into the pluff mud pit with wild abandon.

My camp experience was a bit different.

In 1967, I camped where my mother had been a counselor in 1949. She was excited. I was not.

We had canvas tents, a dining shelter, outdoor sinks with BYOS (bring your own soap) and a two-hole “personal care facility” dubbed the latrine.

The camp was overrun by mosquitoes and I was soon covered with itchy, red welts.

We slept under netting, but mosquitoes found their way in, buzzing in our ears all night.

My camp job was latrine duty. Armed with a steel bucket, a scrub brush and a bottle of liquid Lysol — I still cringe when I see that brown bottle — I scrubbed the bottom-smoothed wood around two dinner plate-size holes.

Camp wasn’t all mosquitoes and Lysol.

There were activities, too. Arts and crafts, swimming, woodsman skills and visiting the camp infirmary.

In two weeks’ time, I stepped on a nail, sliced my leg with a handsaw, had infected bug bites and suffered a fever.

The infirmary had clean floors, clean sheets, real mattresses and a window air conditioner. I loved the infirmary. And the nurse let me sleep in one of the deliciously clean beds.

For those heading to camp this summer, don’t be discouraged. It is a wonderful experience, or at the very least, memorable. Have fun, meet new friends and use lots of bug repellent.

And, introduce yourself to the nurse.

JOCELYN CHABOT

Charleston

It is with great pleasure that I am seeking another term for Charleston County register of deeds. I could not be more proud of my staff. Managing the historic document surge into statutory compliance has been nothing short of a phenomenal effort.

The retirement of several employees with decades of institutional knowledge, low interest rates and the uncertainty of the COVID-19 protocols impacted the staff’s ability to keep up with the barrage of documents.

My efforts as register of deeds have always been to adopt the industry’s best practices and enhance the preservation of the state’s oldest land records. E-recording documents modernizes the process and has been available for more than 20 years. Digitization was not a priority until I became register. There is no reason to continue to use an antiquated system.

Historically low interest rates and the pandemic made us shift the office from the conversion process to address the highest increase in real estate transactions Charleston County has ever witnessed. Due to enormous population growth, transactions rose 30% from 2019 to 2020. From 2020 to 2021, transactions rose 70%.

In spite of the odds, in 2022 and 2021, we set a record with the highest ever recordings at 99,698 and 120,519, respectively. We increased revenue by 62% and we produced the highest revenue generated by any county in the state, despite other counties using e-recording procedures.

We are on pace for another record year in 2022. The herculean effort on the part of the staff helped us maintain state compliance. There has not been a backlog in months. Our goal is to make this office the gold standard of the state.

Know that I appreciate and revere the opportunity to serve the people of Charleston County as register of deeds.

Suggesting that I would abandon my commitment is a mischaracterization of who I am.

MICHAEL MILLER

Charleston

I was disappointed, if not surprised, to see the editorial endorsement of Kathy Maness for South Carolina Superintendent of Education. If you want more of the same, she’s the status quo pick.

I have worked with business, legislative and education leaders here and across the state to improve education for more than three decades now.

Time and again, I have seen the deep resistance to change from Columbia-based associations that continue to push students and teachers to follow outdated ways of thinking.

In my work on major economic development projects, I know first-hand that education matters. States around us are making major moves to reform their education systems, with even Mississippi now lapping us in early reading, the foundation of learning.

The bottom line: If we don’t get in the game, we will lose jobs and economic opportunity for another generation of South Carolina students.

Change is never easy and rarely popular. South Carolina’s kids deserve a leader who has the courage and grace to take the heat.

That’s why I’m supporting Ellen Weaver. She is a hard-working, practical and action-oriented leader.

I’ve seen her energy, determination and ability to get things done first-hand during our time together on the Education Oversight Committee.

Ms. Weaver brings the fresh perspective, integrity and unquestionable leadership and team-building skills that are required if we are going to overcome deeply entrenched mindsets to deliver on the promise of a great education for every student in our state. I encourage voters to join me in supporting her candidacy.

NEIL ROBINSON

Mount Pleasant

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Some Seabrook Island residents call for cap on short-term rentals

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - An ongoing battle over short-term rentals is brewing on Seabrook Island, where homeowners say uncontrolled growth of properties is affecting their quality of life.Homeowners Ted Flerlage and Paul McLaughlin said although they do not want to end short-term rentals on the island, the effects of recent growth have prompted them to call for a cap on short-term rentals.“If you come here in July, around July Fourth, as a resident walking out boardwalk one, let’s say, to north beach, there&rs...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - An ongoing battle over short-term rentals is brewing on Seabrook Island, where homeowners say uncontrolled growth of properties is affecting their quality of life.

Homeowners Ted Flerlage and Paul McLaughlin said although they do not want to end short-term rentals on the island, the effects of recent growth have prompted them to call for a cap on short-term rentals.

“If you come here in July, around July Fourth, as a resident walking out boardwalk one, let’s say, to north beach, there’s no space, and that is a rental issue,” Flerlage, who has lived on the island since March 2020, said. “That is a noise issue. It is a parking issue because every spot on the limited parking area is taken.”

The two homeowners have spearheaded the Preserve Seabrook effort. A letter sent to residents as part of the effort says concerns “center on the uncontrolled growth of short-term rentals, especially on streets where there are many full-time and private residential properties.”

“We aim to retain a reasonable offering of properties that can be rented by guests who love to visit and vacation on our beautiful island, while ensuring Seabrook does not gradually morph into a resort community,” the letter states. “We believe adding a cap on the number of resort properties on Seabrook would protect the unique qualities of our island while allowing revenue generated through rental properties to continue to flow back to the town through state and county accommodation taxes that the renters pay.”

Over 300 residents have signed a petition to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island, according to McLaughlin.

The petition seeks a single question on the Nov. 2, 2021 ballot that asks if voters support:

“Seabrook, when I bought here in 2002 and built our house here in 2009, it was more like ‘Cheers,’” McLaughlin said. “Everybody knew your name. Now, with the influx of 500 rental properties and growing, it’s changed a lot, and the quality of life on the island has changed a lot.”

Seabrook Island Mayor John Gregg said a petition from those calling for a cap has been sent to a committee, which will conduct a factual inquiry and then report to town council with recommendations.

“The object for the ad hoc committee was to identify inquiries of factual matters that could inform council as it considers whether or not it is warranted to do further regulation,” Gregg said.

The mayor added that to operate a short-term rental on the island, homeowners need to have a business license and a permit from the town.

McLaughlin and Flerlage said they welcome the data-driven effort but want more communication from the town and to work with them on a solution.

“Our question to them: What is the tipping point? If 500 isn’t the tipping point, is it 600? Is it 700? Is it 800? So, in the meantime, we need to figure it out,” McLaughlin said. “We need to halt what’s going on. Everybody keeps what they currently have, and we study the problem, and we figure out what the solution would be. We don’t make the problem worse while continuing to study it.”

“These are people who live in South Carolina and vote in South Carolina who live on the island and vote on the island,” Flerlage said. “These are the people who are their direct constituents – the people who vote for the mayor and the town council. It’s more than 300 of those people who signed up, which is nearly as many as who voted for them in the last election on Nov. 2, and in our opinion, there has been no communication and we’ve been getting fairly short-tripped on the issue.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston-area to gain new French and Mediterranean restaurants; new Greek eatery opens

A French-inspired restaurant is adding a fourth location in the Lowcountry while a new Mediterranean-themed diner is now open and another is on the way.Saveurs du Monde Café plans to open in mid-March in the former McCann’s Irish Pub at 1001 Landfall Way on Seabrook Island, according to restaurant CEO Thierry Chateau.“We will serve breakfast, lunch and diner in a casual atmosphere — French-inspired, of course,” he said.It will be open 7:30 ...

A French-inspired restaurant is adding a fourth location in the Lowcountry while a new Mediterranean-themed diner is now open and another is on the way.

Saveurs du Monde Café plans to open in mid-March in the former McCann’s Irish Pub at 1001 Landfall Way on Seabrook Island, according to restaurant CEO Thierry Chateau.

“We will serve breakfast, lunch and diner in a casual atmosphere — French-inspired, of course,” he said.

It will be open 7:30 a.m.-11 p.m. with a band on Fridays. Alcoholic beverages, including local draft beers, will be offered.

Chateau’s three other café sites include two in Mount Pleasant in Belle Station and Seaside Farms and in Charleston in the WestEdge development on the peninsula.

Now serving

A new South Florida-based restaurant chain that plans to have four locations in the Lowcountry is now serving diners with its first South Carolina location on James Island.

The Great Greek Mediterranean Grill opened Feb. 14 at 1417 Folly Road in the Publix-anchored Riverland Market Shopping Center.

Another location is coming to northern Mount Pleasant in The Bend at Carolina Park, a retail center of five buildings across the street from Costco.

The new Charleston-area locations are owned and operated by franchisee Scott Willis and his family.

The menu includes homegrown recipes and traditional gyros along with lamb, steak and chicken souvlaki platters. The new location is open 11 a.m.-8 p.m. daily.

On the way

Also in the realm of Mediterranean fare, a restaurant chain based in the nation’s capital is in the works for the Charleston area.

Cava is set to open later this year in the former Zoë’s Kitchen space at 1242 Belk Drive in Mount Pleasant Towne Centre.

The Washington, D.C.-based company also plans to open its second South Carolina location in Greenville. Opening dates have not been announced for either location.

What’s cooking?

A fast-food chicken restaurant chain is adding a second location in Moncks Corner.

Bojangles plans to build a 2,858-square-foot dining venue at 2605 Highway 52 in Foxbank Town Center near Waffle House and Parker’s Kitchen convenience store. An opening timeframe has not been announced.

The chicken chain currently has 11 locations in the Charleston area.

The new restaurant will be close to a previously announced Dunkin’ donut shop.

Now open

Kickin’ Chicken recently opened on Charleston’s upper peninsula and will begin serving lunch at 11 a.m. on weekends starting Feb. 19.

The restaurant at 45 Romney St. offers evening service starting at 3 p.m. each day.

“We will expand our hours to include weekday lunches when staffing allows,” co-owner Chip Roberts said.

Plans are in the works to add a covered patio area as well. Construction should be completed by the spring, Roberts said.

Gassing up

A convenience store and gas station is in the works in the Johns Island area.

A 4,940-square-foot store with a canopied fueling station is being proposed on Main Road at McLernon Trace near Marsh View Trace Apartments. Gilligan’s Seafood Restaurant is to the south about one block.

The development is referred to as McLernon Trace Fuel Station. Site plans do not indicate the brand of fuel.

Now open

Two new dining concepts now serving in downtown Charleston will celebrate their grand openings with entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 17.

Uptown Hospitality Group, an offshoot of New York bar and restaurant group Eat Drink & Be Merry Hospitality, launched Bodega and Share House at 23 Ann St. on Feb. 15.

The two venues are set up in an 8,000-square-foot former train depot with large garage doors that open onto a block-long pedestrian walkway between Ann and John streets.

Bodega, which started as a pop-up in 2020 in the group’s Uptown Social venue on King Street, offers New York-style sandwiches and charcuterie while Share House brings a coastal cantina vibe with snacks and sliders on the menu. Alcoholic beverages also are available.

Uptown Hospitality Group is a product of New York transplants Keith Benjamin, Kara Graves, Bryn Kelly, Brian Dodd, Kat Moore and chef Alec Gropman.

“Although we are still under the Eat Drink & Be Merry umbrella, we felt it was important to develop a local brand with its own identity,” said Benjamin, group co-founder and senior operating partner.

Bodega will be open 7 a.m.-2 a.m. each day while operating hours for Share House will be 4 p.m.-2 a.m. Monday through Wednesday and noon-2 a.m. Thursday through Sunday.

Art walk

A Kiawah Island retail center is looking to welcome spring a bit early with an annual outdoor event.

The Art Walk is set for 4-7 p.m. Feb. 18 at the Harris Teeter-anchored Freshfields Village Shopping Center at the end of Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

Residents and visitors can watch live art demonstrations and view works from local and visiting artists in participating retail shops while enjoying live jazz music during the free event.

For more details, go to freshfieldsvillage.com/event/art-walk-2022.

South Carolina Supreme Court returns 14 congregations to Episcopal diocese

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-lo...

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.

The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-long legal journey that included a lower court decision in 2014 which was largely overturned by the state’s high court in 2017 and then further clarified with the decision this week.

Of the decision, the Rt. Rev. Ruth Woodliff-Stanley, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, said: “Their decisions will no doubt bring joy to many in our diocese, but for others, there will be grief in the possible finality of a loss they have been feeling for nearly 10 years.” She also added a hope for the future of the reconciled diocese: “We now walk into a bright future, one in which we will focus on the reconciling power of the Gospel to transform injustice, to heal the brokenhearted, and to build God’s beloved community.”

The South Carolina Supreme Court, using a variety of determining factors, decided that 14 parishes (of the 29 previously named) did create an “irrevocable trust in favor of the National Church and its diocese” (the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina – the “Associated Diocese”). These 14 parishes are as follows: Christ Church, Mt. Pleasant; Good Shepherd, Charleston; Holy Comforter, Sumter; Holy Cross, Stateburg; Holy Trinity, Charleston; St. Bartholomew’s, Hartsville; St. David’s, Cheraw; St. Luke’s, Hilton Head; St. Matthew’s, Fort Motte; St. James, Charleston; St. John’s, Johns Island; St. Jude’s, Walterboro; Trinity, Myrtle Beach; and Old St. Andrew’s, Charleston.

Conversely, the Court found that 15 of the 29 parishes “did not create a trust in favor of the National Church or its diocese, and thus those 15 Parishes retain title to their real estate.” These parishes are as follows: All Saints, Florence; Church of our Saviour, John’s Island; Church of the Cross, Bluffton; Christ-St. Paul’s, Yonges Island; Epiphany, Eutawville; Redeemer, Orangeburg; Resurrection, Surfside/Myrtle Beach; St. Helena’s, Beaufort; St. Paul’s, Bennettsville; St. Paul’s, Summerville; St. Philip’s, Charleston; St. Luke & St. Paul, Charleston; St. Michael’s, Charleston; Trinity, Edisto; and Trinity, Pinopolis.

The South Carolina Supreme Court has decided that all real and personal property, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, have been held “in trust for the benefit of the National Church [The Episcopal Church] and the Associated Diocese,” meaning the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. The ruling further concluded that “the real and personal property held in trust by the Trustees is now held for the benefit of the Associated Diocese.”

On all matters and questions relating to “names, styles, emblems, and service marks,” the Court deferred to the federal court. The U.S. District Court previously ruled in favor of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina (also recognized as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina) in September 2019. This decision has been appealed, but any future rulings were stayed pending the outcome of this state case.

In her pastoral letter to the diocese sent hours after receiving the opinion, Woodlff-Stanley discussed the next steps for the diocese. “We are still working to understand the immediate path forward and promise to be in communication with you as our legal team helps us determine what comes next,” said Woodliff-Stanley. “May we focus together on reconciliation and the way of love as we journey together on the road ahead, centered in Christ’s love for all of us.”

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina was one of the nine original dioceses that formed The Episcopal Church in 1785. The Episcopal Church, which encompasses 111 dioceses and regional areas in 17 nations of the world, remains the only denomination in the United States affiliated with the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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