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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Sullivan's Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - Sullivan's Island's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Sullivan's Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

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Mortgage Broker Sullivan's Island, SC
 Refinance Sullivan's Island, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Sullivan's Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage Sullivan's Island, SC

Home Financing in Sullivan's Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Sullivan's Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Sullivan's Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages Sullivan's Island, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Sullivan's Island, SC.

Refinancing in
Sullivan's Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Sullivan's Island, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages Sullivan's Island, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker Sullivan's Island, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Sullivan's Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Sullivan's Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company Sullivan's Island, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Sullivan's Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Sullivan's Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

New Sullivan’s Island restaurant will focus on fresh fish with a side of nostalgia

Restaurants tend to stick around for a long time on Sullivan’s Island.Dunleavy’s Pub turns 30 this year and Poe’s Tavern is on the brink of its 20-year anniversary. In recent years, newer Sullivan’s Island establishments like The Obstinate Daughter, The Co-Op, Home Team BBQ and Mex 1 Coastal Cantina have gained a following that spans the entire Charleston area.When a longtime eating and drinking establishment is forced to close on the island, it’s not required to pay homage to the previous owners, ...

Restaurants tend to stick around for a long time on Sullivan’s Island.

Dunleavy’s Pub turns 30 this year and Poe’s Tavern is on the brink of its 20-year anniversary. In recent years, newer Sullivan’s Island establishments like The Obstinate Daughter, The Co-Op, Home Team BBQ and Mex 1 Coastal Cantina have gained a following that spans the entire Charleston area.

When a longtime eating and drinking establishment is forced to close on the island, it’s not required to pay homage to the previous owners, but it’s not uncommon.

Take Home Team BBQ, which opened on Sullivan’s Island 13 years ago in the space once occupied by Bert’s Pharmacy and Bert’s Bar at 2209 Middle St.

Home Team still utilizes the bar Bert Wurthmann constructed when he converted half of his pharmacy into the beloved Bert’s Bar that served the island until 2007. Island residents who visit Home Team likely recognize Wurthmann in the black-and-white photographs hanging near its entrance today, honoring the building’s historical significance as a social hub for those who lived nearby.

Steps away at 2019 Middle St., the home of forthcoming restaurant Sullivan’s Fish Camp, owners Ben and Kate Towill also plan to connect guests to the building’s previous life while introducing a contemporary concept fit for the future.

When Sullivan’s Fish Camp opens in April, patrons will notice markers hinting at the 32 years of work Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott put into the space as owners of Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant, which closed on Sept. 6, 2020.

For those who frequented the landmark eatery, entering Sullivan’s Fish Camp will feel like stepping into a place that feels familiar and totally different all at once.

That’s the goal the Towills set forth when they took over the iconic building: To honor the last 30-plus years and help the new restaurant earn the same longevity its predecessor and many of its neighbors achieved.

“That was really important to us, this idea of carrying this on and them passing the torch and us to check in with them through that,” said Ben, adding that the couple has been by to express their full support of the new endeavor. “We just keep trying to think back to those places but then doing a very contemporary version of that.”

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic.

A local hand contributed to nearly every element of the restaurant, from the potted plants native to the island that separate the outdoor patio from the road to an old English pub-style sign hanging outside the restaurant made by Sullivan’s Island resident Mickey Williams.

Inside, vintage pieces Kate collected over the last two years cover the walls along with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu. Windows were added to the left side of the restaurant, where patrons will soon sit in booths that feature lamp shades adorned with nautical maps of Sullivan’s Island.

On the right side of the restaurant is the restored bar area, highlighted by the original wood paneling that covered Sullivan’s for three decades. Hanging above the bar are two billiard lamps reading “Sullivan’s Fish Camp” that were made by North Charleston’s Charlestowne Stained Glass Studio.

“I couldn’t find the size and the look I wanted, so I found this local guy in North Charleston,” said Kate, who asked if he could recreate her vision for vintage hanging lights. “He was like, ‘I haven’t done anything like that since the ‘70s.’ And I was like, ‘Precisely, that’s what we need.’ ”

Behind the bar, Sullivan’s Fish Camp bar manager Jordan Moton will serve local beer, easy drinking wines and refreshing cocktails, such as a frozen paloma on tap.

Isle of Palms-born executive chef Davis Hood will lead the Sullivan’s Fish Camp kitchen with plans to offer a refined, local take on the casual fare you would expect to find at a beachfront restaurant — fried seafood baskets, oysters, crudos, a lobster roll, wedge salad with green goddess dressing, spicy fried chicken sandwich and key lime pie (a Sullivan’s Seafood staple).

Hood and his brother Nathan — who recently transitioned from Post House executive chef to culinary director of Basic Projects — used to visit the original Sullivan’s for birthday parties, so the restaurant is near and dear to their family’s heart.

“It’s sort of come full circle,” Ben said. “He knows this place and knows the area.”

Hood’s menu will be broken up into three parts: Raw bites, cooked starters, entrees and sweets. Large-format seafood towers named First Jetty and Second Jetty hint at Hood’s days of jumping off the jetties as a kid nearby on the Isle of Palms.

“He’s a super playful personality,” Suarez said. “I feel like that really comes through with how he’s written the menu.”

Ice cream scoops, sandwiches and other beach bites will be available at the front of the restaurant, where Sullivan’s Fish Camp-branded merchandise made by Stitch Design Co. — such as beach totes, hats and bottle openers — will be available for purchase.

The Towills hope to win over the many who likely still hit the beach wearing Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant garb.

Perhaps they’ll soon add Sullivan’s Fish Camp apparel to their collection.

Sullivan’s Island investigating illegal cutting of maritime forest

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or st...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.

An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or stricter fines.

“This is the epitome of selfishness,” says Town Councilman Scott Millimet reacting to the cutting.

Island residents were also upset with the cutting. “It’s clear these trees weren’t cut by accident, I mean they were purposefully cut to someone’s benefit,” says one resident.

A number of trees along Station 26, the width of a house were chopped and dropped in the town’s maritime forest. The island’s forest has become the center of a debate to save the town’s accredited land over the last several years.

“It damages everybody, it doesn’t just (damage) the two neighbors,” the resident said.

Dozens of trees have been marked and documented by town employees after being cut down. Councilman Millimet says residents couldn’t believe it when learning of the illegal cutting.

“General shock, frustration – bitterness,” says Councilman Millimet when referring to what he’s heard from residents.

Each tree cut down comes with a $1,040 fine but residents and leaders say that might not be enough to prevent future cutting.

“This just proves that there are those out there that until the punishment is enhanced, it’s going to continue,” says Councilman Millimet.

Councilman Millimet believes the fines should be raised and jail time considered for those responsible. “We can try to do some replanting,” says Councilman Millimet. “And then I think we also need to focus on enhancing the punishment.”

Advocates fighting for the future of the maritime forest agree with the measure. “While there are penalties, they are not severe enough to disincentive someone from potentially doing this again,” says Karen Byko, President of Sullivan’s Island 4 All.

With the damage already done along Station 26, leaders and residents hope they can stop additional chopping in the future.

“At the very least, I hope they replant these trees,” says the resident.

“There’s quite a bit of work to do but like I said we’ve got to get the ball rolling because the longer we wait, certain residents have shown that they will act in their own best interest and we’ve got to figure out how to prevent that,” says Councilman Millimet.

Town officials declined to provide a comment on the latest in the investigation.

Legal expert says Sullivan’s Island maritime forest agreement is unenforceable

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – A legal expert hired to review an agreement reached with the Town of Sullivan’s Island regarding the cutting of a maritime forest has deemed the agreement invalid, in his professional opinion.William Wilkins has “five decades of legal experience, including but not limited to 25 years as a United States District Judge for the District of South Carolina and a United States Circuit Judge for the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.”The settlement would allow the town to pe...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – A legal expert hired to review an agreement reached with the Town of Sullivan’s Island regarding the cutting of a maritime forest has deemed the agreement invalid, in his professional opinion.

William Wilkins has “five decades of legal experience, including but not limited to 25 years as a United States District Judge for the District of South Carolina and a United States Circuit Judge for the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.”

The settlement would allow the town to periodically thin portions of a maritime forest, which advocates say is necessary to maintain a view of the beach. Those in opposition worry about the biodiversity of the island.

Wilkins found that the settlement “is invalid because (A) its provisions constitute an improper restriction of the legislative/governmental powers of successor Town Councils, (B) its provisions constitute an improper delegation and/or divestment of the legislative/governmental powers of the Town, and (C) its provisions unfairly, unreasonably, or improperly restrict the proprietary functions of the town.”

He continued, saying “as a result, provisions of the settlement agreement are unenforceable in law or contract.”

Wilkins was careful to point out, however, that his opinion “is not, and should not be construed as, a guarantee of any legal outcome related to the issues presented; nor does it attempt to determine or comment on the wisdom of any non-legal political issues, such as policy decisions of the Town, or any past or present action by the Town.”

He also noted that it “should not be interpreted as a prohibition or restriction on the Town from taking such action as it determines to be ‘necessary for the health, safety, or general welfare of the Town’ and the public at-large to ‘further or effect’ the ‘Public Policies’ enumerated in the covenants set forth in the deed from the Lowcountry Open Land Trust.”

Wilkins went on to lay out what he sees as potential legal paths forward, which would result in “a judicial determination of the rights and obligations of the Town under the Settlement Agreement.”

Click here to read the opinion in full.

Sullivan’s Island residents remain divided over forest as legal expert publishes opinion

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) – Residents of Sullivan’s Island continue to remain divided days after a legal expert published an opinion stating the town’s settlement agreement cannot be enforced.William Wilkins, an attorney hired by Sullivan’s Island, published a 120-page opinion that states the town’s settlement agreement from last year regarding cutting the Maritime Forest is “invalid and unenforceable” under South Carolina law.“The way that the mediation settlement is s...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) – Residents of Sullivan’s Island continue to remain divided days after a legal expert published an opinion stating the town’s settlement agreement cannot be enforced.

William Wilkins, an attorney hired by Sullivan’s Island, published a 120-page opinion that states the town’s settlement agreement from last year regarding cutting the Maritime Forest is “invalid and unenforceable” under South Carolina law.

“The way that the mediation settlement is structured, cutting can begin immediately, and once cutting begins out in the Maritime Forest, we can’t undo it,” Sullivan’s Island for All President Karen Byko said.

The settlement agreement was first agreed upon in October 2020.

“That agreement basically allows the town to cut huge swaths of vegetation out of the Maritime Forest at the request of a few residents who want to cut down the forest in order to gain ocean views and breezes from their homes,” Byko said.

Laurie Volkmann lives across the street from the Maritime Forest and uses it to go on walks with her dog. She said the forest’s fate has polarized the town.

“The issue has been overblown a little bit to be ‘The people on the beach just want to have an oceanside view,’ and knowing the neighbors I’ve talked to, that’s not their primary concern,” Volkmann said.

Byko, meanwhile, said she wants the town to move forward immediately with a judicial review and undo the agreement to keep the forest intact.

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’Neill declined to have an on-camera interview on Thursday.

However, he released the following statement to Live 5:

“As Mayor, I read the opinion with considerable interest, and Mr. Wilkins’ analysis and conclusions seemed to be very clear and unequivocal. Town council has proceeded very methodically, and we will continue to do so.”

As for Volkmann, she said she believes in maintaining the forest to ward off pests and invasive species, but not cutting it all down.

“I would hope that as a community we could all read this and say, ‘We’re OK with some maintenance. We understand that we’re not just going to chop down all the trees, so that we have no Maritime Forest,’” Volkmann said.

The town’s administrator said over the phone that the town council will discuss the opinion over the coming days.

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