With 30 years in the industry

Mortgage Broker in Sullivan's Island, SC

Ask us Anything843-478-5612

Book an Appointment

Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in Sullivan's Island, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - Sullivan's Island's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in Sullivan's Island, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Mortgage Broker Sullivan's Island, SC
 Refinance Sullivan's Island, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in Sullivan's Island, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage Sullivan's Island, SC

Home Financing in Sullivan's Island, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in Sullivan's Island, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in Sullivan's Island, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages Sullivan's Island, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in Sullivan's Island, SC.

Refinancing in
Sullivan's Island, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in Sullivan's Island, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages Sullivan's Island, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker Sullivan's Island, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in Sullivan's Island, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in Sullivan's Island may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company Sullivan's Island, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in Sullivan's Island, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why Sullivan's Island loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

South Carolina Department Of Transportation Stops, Restarts Work On Isle Of Palms Connector Restriping Options

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The South Carolina Department of Transportation stopped working on a study that will provide options to restripe the Isle of Palms Connector in late October, apparently in response to a lawsuit filed by an organization founded by a former IOP mayor and a current Council member.

According to IOP City Administrator Desiree Fragoso, she was informed by the SCDOT the evening of Oct. 31 “that they may be pausing the study.” Four days later, on Nov. 4, Fragoso got the word that SCDOT was moving forward with plans to present its findings to the IOP Council, either on Nov. 15 or Dec. 6, Fragoso said.

“We paused our work in order to let the attorneys review the situation,” Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said in a Nov. 7 email. “Following their review, we resumed work a few days later. The pause had no significant impact. We are still on track to meet with IOP city officials prior to the end of the calendar year.” Mayor Phillip Pounds said the city did not negotiate with the state agency during the week the study was paused but instead “leveraged our relationships SCDOT and State Sen. (Chip) Campsen to get this thing back on track.” Pounds said SCDOT probably would present eight to 10 options for the Connector bridge at the city Council’s Dec. 6 meeting. The next step is “still to be determined.” Pounds noted that the Council, the Public Safety Committee – headed by Jan Anderson – and the general public might all play a role in paring the options down to a workable number. Without any input from the city of Isle of Palms, SCDOT re-striped the bridge in March 2021, adding two bike lanes and two pedestrian lanes and shrinking the center emergency lane from 10 feet to 4 feet. A year later, former Mayor Jimmy Carroll and sitting Council Member Blair Hahn formed The Palm Republic, a privately funded organization that has questioned the constitutionality of S.40, a law passed in 2021 which grants SCDOT the authority to determine where visitors to IOP, Sullivan’s Island, Edisto and Folly Beach can park on state roads and how much, if anything, these municipalities can charge them. The Palm Republic recently filed a petition and complaint with the South Carolina Supreme Court in an effort to force SCDOT to treat these four communities as it treats the state’s other municipalities. The lawsuit also claims that SCDOT violated the Constitution by restriping the bridge without input from the city. Hahn was not happy with what appeared to be SCDOT’s reaction to The Palm Republic’s lawsuit. “Every citizen has a right to challenge the constitutionality of any statute,” Hahn said. “If a government entity threatens to withhold government services because a citizen is challenging the constitutionality of a statute, that government entity should be held accountable because that’s illegal.” “SCDOT didn’t do a single engineering study or engineering report when they re-striped the bridge. They did nothing except follow the direction of those on high,” Hahn added. Fragoso, meanwhile, said the city would work with SCDOT to find ways to make the configuration of the Connector bridge more palatable to the Council and the community.

“We continue to work collaboratively with DOT in solving issues in our community that need addressing, and we’re eager to see the final report on the IOP Connector, evaluate the options presented and discuss the best path for that project,” Fragoso said.

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

An interview with Cadet Col. Brandon Johnson, this year’s Regimental Commander

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.Q&...

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.

Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.

Q&A with Brandon Johnson

What is one word that you would use to describe yourself?

Fearless.

How do you spend your free time?

I always get a workout and a run in. My schedule is busy, but exercise is a daily priority. On the weekends, I enjoy spending time with friends and family. You can always catch me on the boat or the beach. I live right next to Sullivan’s Island, so I frequently spend time there.

What is a quote you live by?

There are two. The first is just two words — “Never settle.” I first started using this short phrase my sophomore year and it has stuck with me ever since. I also live by the Bible verse Isaiah 6:8: “And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?’ Then I said, ‘Here am I! Send me.’” Stepping up to a challenge is something I take pride in, and I am always looking for one.

Why did you choose The Citadel?

In high school, I planned on attending the University of South Carolina. I vividly remember sitting down at the dinner table and deciding that I was going to attend The Citadel. I changed my mind because I was seeking a lifestyle that was uncommon for most people my age. I knew the structure and discipline would benefit me. Thankfully I made the right decision, and I have not looked back since.

Who inspires you the most and why?

My father is a huge inspiration for me, his character and selflessness are something I truly admire. No matter what decision I make, he always supports me. I frequently call him to ask for advice and he always seems to have the right answer. Without my parents, I would be no where near where I am today. He has made countless sacrifices for me and my siblings. He always pushes me to be my best in any endeavor.

What made you want to become the Regimental Commander and what are your goals for the school year?

I love The Citadel and wanted to make a difference for my fellow cadets. I am fortunate to have great mentors who always push me to be my best here, and they are a big reason why I made it this far. At the beginning of the year, my main goals were to develop as many leaders as possible, give cadets the ability to lead and to create an environment that is both productive and enjoyable. I want everyone to take pride in their Citadel experience.

As a knob, did you ever see yourself becoming the Regimental Commander?

I was not dead set on becoming the Regimental Commander, however, I knew I could do it if I set my mind to it — I knew I had the potential. I learned early on that my effort was the only limiting factor to my success in life. I always wanted to be a commander at some level. At the end of the day, I wanted to be a leader.

You are the Regimental Commander the same year the Citadel celebrates 100 Years on the Ashley. How important and special is that to you?

It is very important to me. I have always had an astounding amount of respect for all of the classes that came before mine. The legacies they left behind are still carried throughout the Corp of Cadets. The Citadel truly is a special place and it is an honor to be carrying on the legacy of the campus. The cadets are what make the past 100 years so meaningful. Without the past, present and future cadets, The Citadel’s life-changing experience would disappear. I hope to see another 100 years of the road less traveled.

What is your plan after you graduate and what will you miss the most after you graduate?

I am going to begin my career right here in Charleston. Thankfully, I am fortunate to have professional experience in the maritime logistics industry through past internships. I have no doubt I will miss all the brothers and sisters I have gained along the way. I am beyond fortunate to be surrounded by peers who constantly push themselves. Being surrounded by the best 18-to-22-year-olds in the country is a humbling and rewarding experience.

What life lesson have you learned here that you will take with you after you graduate?

I have learned so much that it’s honestly hard to put it into words. I developed what I believe to be the most important and beneficial trait for any human — discipline. I’ve learned that means doing the things you need to do when you don’t want to do them and having a constant force pushing me to be my best every day. Discipline is earned through the challenges we face here.

Joshua Tolbert is a junior from North Charleston, South Carolina and a computer engineering major. On campus, he is the Regimental Public Affairs NCO and participates in the Gospel Choir, African American Association and The National Society of Black Engineers. After graduation, Tolbert plans to become a database administrator.

Related:

Mission Essential: Special Agent Brent Daniels, ’99

Mission Essential: Special Agent Yates Gupton, ’97

“I instantly knew that this was the place for me”: Meet Coast Guard veteran student Ricardo Quintero

Sullivan’s Island restaurant opens with fresh fish, ’1970s-inspired’ beachside aesthetic

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood an...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood and beach-themed cocktails Tuesday through Sunday.

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic. Her goal was to give the space a fresh look with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu.

A place that feels new and nostalgic all at once.

“That’s been the biggest compliment that we have received is (people saying) ‘Oh it feels like it’s been here forever,’ ” Kate Towill said.

Leading the kitchen as executive chef is Davis Hood, who grew up on Isle of Palms with his brother Nathan, culinary director of Basic Projects. Hood, who recalls walking by the Middle Street building on his way to Sullivan’s Island Elementary School, is focusing on sustainability at the new Sullivan’s Island restaurant.

Local purveyors like Abundant Seafood, Tarvin Seafood, Lowcountry Oyster Co., Vertical Roots and Peculiar Pig Farm dot the Sullivan’s Fish Camp menu.

“It’s not your average fish camp in my eyes,” Hood said. “The whole concept of snout to tail cooking, we’re trying to bring that vibe but with fish. Understanding that the ocean is such an important part of our lives and not trying to have any waste.”

If there is one dish that epitomizes this approach, it’s the Sullivan’s Island Gumbo that features Tarvin Seafood shrimp, clams, okra, lobster broth, dayboat fish and Anson Mills Charleston Gold Rice. The West African style gumbo’s gluten-free base is made using chicken bones, lobster shells, shrimp shells, fennel, celery, palm oil and Bradford Family Farm okra, which replaces a roux as the stew’s thickening agent.

Ben Towill said the gumbo, along with the pan-roasted fish of the day and tempura nori tuna with furikake aioli have been some of the restaurant’s top sellers in its first weeks of service.

“We feel like the menu’s been received really well,” Ben Towill said. “Guests and everyone have felt really comfortable which has been a big bonus.”

Fresh seafood isn’t the only element that gives Sullivan’s Fish Camp that desired beachside feel. Self-described “fruity” cocktails like the tequila-based Sumter’s Watch, rum-based Sullivan Swizzle and the frozen paloma will immediately put patrons on island time.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is open for dinner from 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and lunch is currently served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The restaurant plans to eventually serve lunch and dinner daily.

For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com or call 843-883-2100.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.