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Classic Home Mortgage Providing Trustworthy Mortgage Guidance for Over 30 Years

Buying a home is one of the most significant investments that you will ever make. Like most good things, finding the perfect home comes with a lot of work. From your initial search online to your home tour and finally closing, there are many difficult decisions to make along the way. The bottom line is that the entire home buying process can be very stressful, especially when it comes to finding the right mortgage broker and loan for your new home. Since market conditions and mortgage programs change frequently, you have a lot riding on your broker's ability to provide quick and accurate financial advice. Whether you're a first-time homebuyer or own several residential properties, you need a mortgage broker in West Ashley, SC, who can educate you on mortgage rates and provide trustworthy guidance to help you make an informed decision.

My name is Dan Crance - West Ashley's most trusted mortgage loan officer with more than 30 years in the mortgage industry. I bring unparalleled insight and decades of experience into your home loan process. If you're looking for a new home loan, are interested in refinancing your current mortgage, or need information regarding FHA, VA, or other types of loans, Dan Crance is Your Mortgage Man.

Unlike some mortgage loan officers in West Ashley, my primary goal is to help you make the right mortgage choice for you and your family. Mortgage lenders have a horrible reputation for turning over clients quickly to expedite cash flow and make the most money possible. While some mortgage brokers come off as pushy and impatient, I encourage my clients to take as much time as they need to ask questions and review their mortgage agreements. I'm here to help answer those questions and provide you with easy-to-understand advice so that you can rest easy knowing you made the right choice. I could say that I strive to provide service that exceeds your expectations, but I'd rather show you. In the end, I want you to leave feeling confident in the loan you've selected, as well as in your choice of broker.

Service Areas
Mortgage Broker West Ashley, SC
 Refinance West Ashley, SC

Why Choose Dan Crance As Your Mortgage Lender in West Ashley, SC?

Clients choose my mortgage company because I truly care about helping them navigate the often-confusing landscape of the mortgage process. I am fiercely dedicated to my clients and make every effort to provide them with trustworthy advice and an open line of communication.

In my business, I work for two different customers. On one hand, I have the buyer: the person entrusting me with the responsibility of guiding them through one of the most important decisions ever. Serving homebuyers is not a task that I take lightly. I work with them daily to help them through the process and provide timely updates and news on their mortgage status. On the other hand, I have the realtor: the person who works with my client to find their dream home. Since their commission is in my hands, working with realtors is also a very important task. I update these agents on the status of their customers weekly. Only when I take care of both parties can I say my job as a mortgage loan officer is complete.

As a mortgage broker with more than 30 years of experience, I pledge to give you the highest level of customer service while providing you with the most competitive loan products available. That way, you can buy the home of your dreams without second-guessing your decision.

 Conventional Mortgage West Ashley, SC

Home Financing in West Ashley, SC

At Classic Home Mortgage, our team works diligently to close on time without stress or hassle. Whether you're a seasoned homeowner or are buying your new home in West Ashley, we understand how much stress is involved. Our goal is to help take that stress off of your plate by walking you through every step of the home loan process. Because every one of our clients is different, we examine each loan with fresh eyes and a personalized approach, to find you the options and programs you need.

With over 30 years as a mortgage professional in West Ashley, Dan Crance will help you choose the home loan, interest rate, term options, and payment plans that fit your unique situation.

 FHA Mortgages West Ashley, SC

When you work with Classic Home Mortgage, you can always count on our team to:

  • Put your needs first.
  • Work efficiently and quickly. Many of our home loans close in 30 days or less.
  • Offer you a variety of home loans to choose from, and help you make an informed decision.
  • Provide you with competitive rates that make sense for your budget and lifestyle.

While no two loan terms are the same, a few of the most common loan types include:

30-Year Loan - This loan is often considered the most secure option to choose. With a 30-year loan, you can lock in a low payment amount and rest easy knowing your rate won't change.

FHA Loan - If you're not able to make a large down payment, an FHA loan could be the right choice for you. With an FHA loan, many of our clients have successfully purchased a home with less than 4% down.

VA Loan - This loan is reserved for military veterans and active-duty men and women. Those who qualify may be able to purchase a home with no down payment and no Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Choosing a home loan is an important step in the home buying process. At Classic Home Mortgage, we are here to make choosing a loan as easy as possible, so you can focus on the joys of being a homeowner. Contact our team of experts today and ask how you can get pre-qualified for your home loan in West Ashley, SC.

Refinancing in
West Ashley, SC

Because home mortgage rates in the U.S. have been so low over the last year, many current homeowners are opting to refinance their home loans. Simply put, refinancing is replacing your existing mortgage with a different mortgage under new terms. Homeowners who refinance their homes enjoy lower interest rates, lower monthly payments, and even turn their home's equity into cash. If you're interested in refinancing your home, it all begins with a call to your mortgage broker in West Ashley, SC - Dan Crance.

Here are just a few reasons why more homeowners in the U.S. are taking advantage of lower rates and refinancing their homes:
 Home Ready Mortgages West Ashley, SC
Shorter Term Loan

Shorter Term Loan

Refinancing from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage might seem counterproductive on the surface because your monthly payment usually goes up. However, interest rates on 15-year mortgages are lower. And when you shave off years of your previous mortgage, you will pay less interest over time. These savings can be very beneficial if you are not taking the mortgage interest deduction on your tax returns.

Do Away with FHA

Do Away with FHA

FHA loans are notorious for paying premiums for the life of the loan. Mortgage insurance premiums for FHA loans can cost borrowers as much as $1,050 a year for every $100k borrowed. The only way to get rid of mortgage insurance premiums is to refinance to a new loan that the Federal Housing Authority does not back.

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Switch to Fixed Rate or Adjustable-Rate Home Loan

Sometimes, borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages refinance so they can switch to a fixed rate, which lets them lock in an interest rate. Doing so is beneficial for some homeowners who like to know exactly how much their monthly payment is each month. Conversely, some homeowners with fixed rates prefer to refinance to an adjustable-rate mortgage. Homeowners often go this route if they plan on selling in a few years and don't mind risking a higher rate if their plans fall through.

 Mortgage Banker West Ashley, SC

Common Questions About Home Loans

Finding the right loan can be a difficult proposition, even if you have been through the process before. This is especially true since mortgage rates and market conditions change frequently. If you're like most of my clients, you probably have questions about interest rates, refinancing options, and a litany of other topics. To help alleviate some of your stress, here are just a few common questions with answers so that you can better educate yourself as we work our way to securing your loan.

Generally speaking, you should consider refinancing when mortgage rates are 2% lower than the current rate on your home loan. For some homeowners, refinancing makes sense when there is only a 1% difference. Reducing your mortgage rate is a great way to save money or apply your savings to a home upgrade. The money you save on your refinanced loan depends on your loan amount, budget, income, and charges from interest rates. It's crucial that you work with a trusted mortgage loan officer in West Ashley, SC, to help calculate your refinancing options.
This is one of our most frequently asked questions at Classic Home Mortgage. In simple terms, points let you make a tradeoff between the upfront costs of your loan and your monthly payment amount. Points are essentially costs that you have to pay to your mortgage lender to get financing under specific terms. A point is defined as a percentage on your loan amount. 1-point is equal to 1% of the loan. So, 1 point on a loan worth $100,000 is equivalent to $1,000. When you pay some of the interest on your home loan upfront, you use discount points to lower your interest rate.
If you plan to live in the property for a few years, it makes a lot of sense to pay points to lower your interest rate. Doing so will help lower your monthly loan payment, which you can use to save money. Paying points may also increase the amount of money that you can borrow. If you do not plan on living in the property for at least a few years, this strategy might not make financial sense because you might not be able to make up the amount of the discount points you paid up-front.
In short, yes, your mortgage lender will need to know your credit score. Credit scoring is a system that creditors use to decide whether they will give you credit. Your credit score helps creditors decide how creditworthy you are or how likely you will repay your loan. In most circumstances, creditors will use your FICO scores during the loan process. Your score will fall between high risk (350) and low risk (850). Your credit score plays a big role in the loan process, and as such, your score must be accurate before submitting a credit report when applying for a loan.
The answer to this question depends on how money you choose to put as a down payment on your home. On a conventional loan, if your down payment is less than 20% of the price of your home, your mortgage broker in West Ashley may require you to get Private Mortgage Insurance or PMI for short. This insurance protects your lender in the event you default on your mortgage. The best way to avoid paying for this insurance is to make a down payment of 20% or more of the purchase price of your home.
 Mortgage Company West Ashley, SC

Trust Dan Crance

Your Mortgage Lender in West Ashley, SC

Whether you're selling, buying, refinancing, or building the home of your dreams, you have a lot riding on your home loan specialist. When you need a mortgage broker who works tirelessly for you, answers your questions, provides guidance, and does so with a genuine smile, Dan Crance is your mortgage man. Contact Dan today at 843-478-5612 to get pre-approved and discover why West Ashley loves Classic Home Mortgage.

After hours by appointment only. CONTACT DAN

Latest News in West Ashley, SC

West Ashley brewery adds 2nd taproom; hard kombucha brewery opening downtown

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.Thos...

Two new taprooms are coming to Charleston in the next month.

One is a newcomer specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, while the other is a household name known for signature beers like the Sungazer hazy IPA.

Craft beer drinkers will find that beer and other refreshing sippers at Avondale brewery Charles Towne Fermentory, which will add a second taproom outfitted with a spacious beer garden, site owner Adam Goodwin told The Post and Courier.

Those who attended Charleston Beer Week might recognize the new taproom called The Garden by Charles Towne Fermentory. The 1331 Ashley River Road compound, that was previously occupied by Wine and Design, hosted Beer Week’s grand finale in November 2021.

“When I found this property it was kind of just perfect,” Goodwin said. “We ended up fully gutting the building. We added (a nearly) 1,000-square-foot covered deck out back and then did all the landscaping outside to make it a little more of an accommodating place to hang and enjoy beer.”

Goodwin has the capability to brew small test batches at the new location, but the majority of The Garden’s 8-14 beers will come from Charles Towne Fermentory’s 5,000-square-foot Avondale brewery at 809 Savannah Highway.

Because of South Carolina’s three-tier system, Goodwin must purchase his own beer from a distributor in order to sell at The Garden, which will also offer wine and cider for non-beer drinkers.

The Garden will host a grand opening party May 28, with Co-Hog and Foxes Fried popping up with food at the event. Moving forward, The Garden will be open from 2-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday.

As Charles Towne Fermentory expands, downtown Charleston’s brewery district is adding another brewery to a list that already includes destinations like Revelry Brewing Co., Munkle Brewing Co. and Edmund’s Oast Brewing Co.

Specializing in lagers and hard kombucha, Bevi Bene Brewing Co. is located in The Lumberyard development at 1859 Summerville Ave. in downtown Charleston. Guests can expect to find eight beers and a handful of hard kombuchas when the new brewery opens June 18.

Husband-and-wife entrepreneurs Marissa and Clay Carlisle are behind Bevi Bene, which means “drink well” in Italian. The 5,000-square-foot space features an outdoor patio and mural by Savannah artist JULU that is visible heading northbound on Interstate 26.

“We’re a lager focused brewery,” Marissa Carlisle said. “We will have sours and then we’ll be introducing hard kombucha to the Charleston community.”

Specifically, Bevi Bene will serve traditional lagers, kettle sours and hard kombucha. “Mostly sessionable stuff which means lower alcohol just because we want people to come stay awhile,” according to Clay Carlisle.

To make the hard kombucha, he brews regular kombucha that’s put in a closed fermenter with more sugar and brewer’s yeast. The yeast eats the sugar, converting it into ethanol (alcohol produced by fermentation). Bevi Bene is believed to be the first Charleston area brewery to offer hard kombucha.

The brewery will host a grand opening on June 25, with food trucks Chucktown Meatball Co. and Vibrant Alkaline Vegan Meals serving at the event.

Once open, Bevi Bene will serve customers from 1-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, noon-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday and noon-9 p.m. Sunday.

'I couldn't stop telling him how amazing he is, how grateful I am': West Columbia woman reunited with sentimental ring

"It's one of the little things I have left of my son and I truly thought I was never going to get it back. I thought it was gone," Ashley Henry said.WEST COLUMBIA, S.C. — We've all suffered from that feeling of panic in realizing a piece of jewelry you love is missing. Sadly, most times that ring or necklace never comes back.But that was not the case for Ashley Henry.She and her family were spending the day at Lake Murray, a ...

"It's one of the little things I have left of my son and I truly thought I was never going to get it back. I thought it was gone," Ashley Henry said.

WEST COLUMBIA, S.C. — We've all suffered from that feeling of panic in realizing a piece of jewelry you love is missing. Sadly, most times that ring or necklace never comes back.

But that was not the case for Ashley Henry.

She and her family were spending the day at Lake Murray, a place meant for fun family and adventure, when it turned into a location of loss shortly after.

Henry took off her locket at a picnic table before getting into the water. It's a very sentimental piece of jewelry that reminds her of the son she lost nine months ago.

The ring attached to the locket even has his hair inside it, so it can't be replaced.

"My husband grabbed it and put it in my bag, so I paid no attention, I assumed I had clasped it even though I hadn't and so I knew exactly where it would've come off at," Henry said.

But Ashley didn't notice the ring was gone from the locket chain until days later. She checked that picnic table on Lake Murray but couldn't find it, so she posted to Facebook for help. The answer came only a few days later.

"I just like to do some good where I can, make people happy," said Zachary Allen, man who found the ring.

A North Carolina resident saw her post through a mutual friend and drove 3.5 hours to help.

"I know that I'm dealing with my own thing battling cancer and I can only imagine what she had to go through having a son with special needs and losing him," Allen said.

Henry was overwhelmed with emotion and gratitude.

"It just meant so much to me that he did that, just trying to, I mean who does that, who goes that far out of their way? I just felt so grateful," Henry said. "I felt so many emotions ... It was so hard to even put into words how I felt because of how extremely special this ring is to me to begin with."

Henry said she and her family would camp out at that picnic table often when they go to the lake.

"I think Aiden was protecting my ring, keeping it safe until this guy got here," Henry said.

As a thank you, Henry tells News 19 she wants to donate to St. Jude's Hospital for cancer research on Zachary's behalf.

She's also created a Go Fund Me for Zachary's medical expenses that you can find here.

New Summerville restaurant opens June 1; West Ashley sandwich shop now serving

The latest restaurant venture from chef Nico Romo is ready to welcome diners.Italian-concept Laura will open June 1 at 101 N. Main St. in downtown Summerville.The new Flowertown restaurant, inspired by the culture and cuisine of Romo’s grandmother — the eatery’s namesake — will be open nightly for dinner at first with Saturday lunch and Sunday brunch added later.Dinner hours will be 4-10 p.m. daily. All-day Saturday service will run noon-10 p.m. starting June 11. ...

The latest restaurant venture from chef Nico Romo is ready to welcome diners.

Italian-concept Laura will open June 1 at 101 N. Main St. in downtown Summerville.

The new Flowertown restaurant, inspired by the culture and cuisine of Romo’s grandmother — the eatery’s namesake — will be open nightly for dinner at first with Saturday lunch and Sunday brunch added later.

Dinner hours will be 4-10 p.m. daily. All-day Saturday service will run noon-10 p.m. starting June 11. Sunday brunch from 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. is set to start July 3.

Romo bought the property in 2019 for $500,000, according to Dorchester County land records, with plans to open earlier, but the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted those plans.

Nico Hospitality Group also operates Bistronomy on the Charleston peninsula and Nico|Oysters and Seafood in Mount Pleasant.

The 6,000-square-foot restaurant includes an indoor bar as well as an outdoor dining area with a bar.

Now serving

A second West Ashley location for a sandwich and ice cream shop is welcoming customers.

Ye Ole Fashioned Cafe & Ice Cream Parlor had a soft opening open May 23 in the outparcel space formerly occupied by Famous Toastery at 1319 Sam Rittenberg Blvd. in Ashley Landing Shopping Center. A grand opening is set for 11 a.m. June 10 with a ribbon-cutting and special offering of buy one scoop, get one free.

Rolando Ravelo said this will be his first location as a co-owner after working in two other Ye Ole Fashioned sites for a few years. Hours will be 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 9 a.m.-midnight Friday and Saturday.

The other West Ashley location is at 474 Savannah Highway.

Ye Ole Fashioned also operates two restaurants in Summerville and one each in Goose Creek, Mount Pleasant and North Charleston. Famous Toastery closed last year after opening in 2018.

Opening soon

A new restaurant plans to open soon on Charleston’s upper peninsula.

Heavy’s Barburger is slated to open in June in the former Tattooed Moose space at 1137 Morrison Drive.

It’s the product of John Haire and Brandon Stewart. The business is named for Haire’s grandfather, who was called “Heavy.”

“Heavy’s will be a neighborhood burger joint ... smashin’ burgers & shakin’ margaritas,” Haire said. “Our menu will also include creative sandwiches, fresh salads and a full bar. ”

It will be open 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily with later hours on weekends.

Tattooed Moose moved earlier this year to 4845 Chateau Ave., one block off East Montague Avenue in North Charleston.

Gassing up

A new gas station and convenience store is planned at the corner of a heavily traveled West Ashley intersection where a bank once operated.

Savannah-based Parker’s Kitchen plans to build a 3,800-square-foot shop with 12 fueling stations under a canopy at Sam Rittenberg Boulevard and Ashley River Road where Wells Fargo Bank closed more than a year ago, according to site plans.

The 1-acre parcel is across the street from a Circle K convenience store and gas station.

In the details

A new car detailing business is now open in West Ashley.

Palmetto Suns Detailing is at 1856 Belgrade Ave., off Wappoo Road. It’s open by appointment from 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

The company was founded by Heath Hudgins and Van Patterson. Patterson, with 15 years of car restoration experience, is the day-to-day operator.

The professional-grade shop specializes in car detailing, paint correction and ceramic coatings.

“We consider ourselves a true detailing business rather than a carwash masquerading as a detailing shop,” Hudgins said. “What we do can’t be done with the tools and materials in someone’s garage.”

Tri-county school districts offering free meals this summer

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With the end of the school year rapidly approaching, thousands of children across the state are at risk of going hungry.According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, more than 467,000 children in South Carolina ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With the end of the school year rapidly approaching, thousands of children across the state are at risk of going hungry.

According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, more than 467,000 children in South Carolina qualify for free or reduced-price meals. State law mandates that all public schools participate in the National School Lunch Program.

To ensure children do not need to worry about where their next meal will come from, Tri-county school districts are offering free meal programs all summer long.

Charleston County

Charleston County School District is working to fill the nutrition gap during summer break with its Seamless Summer Feeding Program (SSFP).

The district reports that roughly half (25,000) of enrolled students qualify for free or reduced-price school meals, which is why they offer complimentary breakfast and lunches at locations throughout Charleston County.

Breakfast and homemade hot lunches will be prepared at 10 CCSD school kitchens and cafeterias and distributed to sites in McClellanville, North Charleston, James Island, Johns Island, Hollywood, downtown Charleston, and West Ashley for pickup. Serving and eating utensils, plates, napkins, and condiments will be provided.

Meals are prepared to meet federal meal patterns and nutritional requirements and lunches may include hot entrees such as crispy chicken nuggets, hamburgers, and hotdogs. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and low-fat chocolate and white milk are included with every meal.

Any child or teen (18 years old or younger) are eligible for free meals without prior approval.

The program starts June 6 and runs through August 5. Pickup locations will be posted here on June 10.

Berkeley County

Berkeley County School District is also offering a free meal service for children 18 years old and younger.

Beginning June 6, BSCD nutrition workers will serve meals every Monday through Thursday at the following locations:

Breakfast service is from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and includes 1 oz meat or meat alternate, 1 serving of grain, 1/2 cup juice or fruit, and an 8 oz milk.

Lunch service is from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and includes 2 oz meat or meat alternate, 1/2 cup vegetable, 1/2 cup fruit, 1 serving grain, and an 8 oz milk.

Hot meals are available at no cost to students, but children must eat at the site.

The program runs through July 28. Click here to see the menus.

Dorchester County

Through the Seamless Summer Option Meals Program, Dorchester District Two will provide breakfast and lunch on a first-come, first-served basis to all children 18 years old and younger.

Meals are served Monday through Thursday at the following locations:

Breakfast is available from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and lunch is available from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Each meal contains whole grains, protein, fruit or vegetable, and milk. As with Berkeley County, meals must be eaten at the pickup site.

In addition, DD2 schools conducting summer programs will provide complimentary breakfast and lunch to all program enrolled students.

The free meal program runs from June 6 to July 14.

Editorial: Find better traffic solutions for West Ashley than I-526 extension

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of ...

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.

But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of that — the state capped its commitment at $420 million and already has spent more than $45 million toward that cap — the project’s status has gone from impractical to practically ridiculous. Or, as Councilman Henry Darby said Thursday, “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.”

Instead of getting kicked by the mule yet again, it’s time for Charleston County and state transportation officials to back away from the special status of this project, also known as the Mark Clark extension (even though it would be a 45 mph parkway, not an interstate), and instead redouble their efforts on other traffic solutions that can be completed more quickly, less expensively and with more widespread public favor.

This road is going nowhere fast, but that reality must not make officials too complacent to tackle the serious congestion problems that made extension advocates think it was a good idea in the first place. Even if a magical solution were to appear, the extension still would take more than a dozen years to build. S.C. Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall has recommended proceeding with about $150 million in engineering work to get the project ready for bid, but we urge her and Charleston County not to spend another cent.

Instead, they should use that money to launch a special planning effort to identify better options for easing congestion in West Ashley as well as on Johns and James islands. That would move us toward a solution faster than somehow hoping there will be a way forward for the Mark Clark extension when the state Transportation Department returns to the county in a few months with an even more refined cost estimate. Some council members suggest opponents have delayed 526 and driven up its costs. Even if that were true, and we would argue it’s not, they should think about this: Now that it costs more than $1 billion more, are those opponents going to give up now?

There are other solutions that aren’t as dramatic but also wouldn’t be nearly as costly or controversial, such as building the “pitchfork” roads on both sides of Maybank Highway from River Road to the Stono River bridge. The ongoing work to address Main Road, from Bees Ferry to Betsy Kerrison, also will help, and there are other projects in West Ashley that could help, too. We also believe our tax dollars would be better spent beginning a study on a bus rapid transit line through West Ashley similar to the one being developed along Rivers Avenue. In other words, we should seek many solutions, not a single, prohibitively expensive one.

Extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands in particular was never a good idea because of the environmental damage involved and the dubious impact it would have on traffic congestion, particularly when measured by the bang for the buck. More cost-effective solutions can address traffic without marring the edges of these two sea islands.

Look at it another way: From a traffic engineering standpoint, it might be easier to get around the Charleston region if Interstate 526 were extended from where it ends at U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant through the Old Village and across the Cooper River to where the James Island connector touches down on the peninsula. It would be like building our own ring road, like Interstate 285 around Atlanta.

Of course, nobody has suggested that — for a multitude of reasons that go far beyond cost.

For years, development on Johns Island has been allowed to spread rapidly while road improvements lagged far behind, a scenario that has played out in other parts of the Charleston metro area. Anyone who lives on Johns Island or travels there knows it’s a frustrating problem that also impacts West Ashley and James Island. But that’s another reason why state and local officials should step back from their grand 526 extension plan and refocus their thinking on more cost-effective, practical traffic solutions.

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